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Posts by Corey Poole (105)

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Ontario study shows arts and culture attract top talent

Business for the Arts has released the results of a new study that details the extent to which arts and culture attract both skilled workers and the businesses that seek them. Culture for Competitiveness: How Vibrant Culture Attracts Top Talent was created with support from the Ontario Arts Council, with research conducted by Nanos Research.

The study shows that a vibrant arts and culture scene, including live music events, can be a major driver in attracting and retaining employees, and is based on a survey of 500 skilled workers, and 508 businesses in Ontario. While businesses recognize the magnetic nature of arts and culture to skilled workers, the study concludes that they can do more to support local arts communities. According to the study, only 25% of businesses in Ontario make financial contributions to arts and/or cultural organizations in their community.

“The study’s bottom line is that businesses need to make arts and culture more of a priority,” said Nichole Anderson, President & CEO of Business for the Arts. “Our culture for competitiveness study confirms that skilled workers seek out vibrant arts and culture hubs when making job decisions, but businesses who could benefit from the magnetic effect of culture are not investing in their arts and culture ecosystem.”

The study includes the following findings:

  • 60 per cent of businesses said that there are usually more qualified and attractive potential employees in communities with a thriving arts scene
  • 64 per cent of businesses said that a thriving arts and culture scene is something that would make it easier to attract top talent to their community
  • 49 per cent of skilled workers go to arts and cultural festivals two to four times per year
  • Just over half of skilled workers said that a healthy vibrant arts and culture community has influenced their choice regarding which city they would want to work in
  • Skilled workers in Toronto tend to value arts and culture more than those living elsewhere (85 per cent compared to 73 per cent)
  • 75 per cent of skilled workers agreed that government support for the arts makes a more livable community

Thriving Arts Scene Image

The results of this new study echo parts of Music Canada and IFPI’s Mastering of a Music City report. One finding in the report was that music branding undertaken by a city adds a “cool” factor, that can attract and retain investment and talent. In Berlin, the intermingling of music and tech businesses has demonstrated that a successful music economy can attract and retain talent in other industries as well.

The Mastering of a Music City looks to global cities where an understanding exists that arts, culture, and music specifically, help to attract talent and business. Fredrik Sandsten, Event Manager Music at the public tourism agency in Sweden says of Gothenburg, “We have a very industrial city with huge industrial companies. They want culture and music to flourish because they see the link to attracting young workers to their companies.”

Ontario is home to many communities with vibrant arts scenes, where music, in addition to attracting businesses and talent, contributes directly to the economy. Music Canada’s report Live Music Measures Up: An Economic Impact Analysis of Live Music in Ontario identified that live music companies generated $628 million from live music activities in 2013, and brought a total impact of 10,500 jobs to the province.

Music Canada welcomes the results of Business for the Arts’ new study, and encourages Canadian businesses to support their local arts communities, including local music scenes, so that those communities and businesses continue to flourish together.

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CMW announces 2017 dates and the first Austin-Toronto showcase

Canadian Music Week 2017 will take over Toronto from April 18 – 22. The four-night festival will host over 800 showcasing bands at more than 40 venues in the city’s downtown. 2017’s convention will be held at the Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, 123 Queen Street West.

CMW 2017

At CMW 2016, global city planners and the music industry met for The Mastering Of A Music City, a one-day international creative economy summit, which was inspired by Music Canada’s report of the same name. Austin was a focal point of the conference, and the report, because of its incredible music economy, where music tourism accounts for almost half of their US$1.6 billion economic output.

Neill Dixon (right), CEO Canadian Music Week and Don Pitts (left), Music & Entertainment Division Manager - ATX Music & Entertainment Division, City of Austin. Photo via CMW.

Neill Dixon (right), CEO Canadian Music Week and Don Pitts (left), Music & Entertainment Division Manager – ATX Music & Entertainment Division, City of Austin. Photo via CMW.

CMW 2017 will present the first Austin-Toronto showcase, featuring premier talent from both cities. The showcase is an outcome of the recent Austin-Toronto Alliance Summit, where industry leaders met in Toronto in June of 2016. The Music City Alliance between Toronto and Austin was formed in 2013 to promote mutual growth opportunities between governments and industry.

For more information on CMW 2017, head over to their website at www.cmw.net

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The Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport unveils Ontario’s Tourism Action Plan

Roots at Luminato

A crowd enjoying The Roots at Toronto’s Luminato Festival, via Ontario’s Tourism Action Plan

One of the final announcements made by Michael Coteau as Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport was the release of Ontario’s Tourism Action Plan. Since the release, Eleanor McMahon has been appointed Minister of Tourism Culture and Sport, and Michael Coteau is now Minister of Children and Youth Services. In the Plan, the province’s tourism industry is said to generate over $28.5 billion annually, which represents 4% of the GDP.

According to the press release, sector wide engagement across the diverse tourism industry produced an agreement amongst leaders – the need for immediate action. The Plan identifies five priority areas the Government will focus on: Indigenous-led tourism, Francophone tourism, the sharing economy, culture and sport linkages, and events and celebrations.

Music Canada has found that live music events and celebrations contribute significantly to Ontario’s economy. In our report, Live Music Measures Up: An Economic Impact Analysis of Live Music in Ontario, we determined that in 2013, the total impact of music tourism in Ontario was 9,530 jobs, $405.1 million in labour income, and $609.1 million in gross domestic product.

The Action Plan’s five priority areas are further broken down into twelve action items.  Several of them provide clear opportunities for the live music, and music tourism sectors:

  • An Investment Approach for Economic Growth recognizes that investment from the private sector is critical to increasing visitation and creating jobs.
  • A New Approach to Data Collection to Improve Data Quality and Availability could allow for data relating to music events, whether it’s live or recorded music, to be collected in its own independent category.
  • Working Together to Improve the Business Climate for Tourism – Reduce Regulatory Burdens. The Government has expressed a commitment to improving the regulatory environment for the tourism industry, and plans to hold discussions with industry partners to prioritize regulatory challenges faced by the sector. In Live Music Measures Up, Music Canada found that the legal and regulatory environment was the only factor live music companies in Ontario identified as having a net negative impact on their success.

We encourage our partners involved in live music and events to continue to engage in discussions, and provide feedback to the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport as more detailed plans are developed.

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Does Toronto need a night mayor? Music Canada’s Amy Terrill asks the question in Huffington Post article

Music Cities banner

Amsterdam was the first city to appoint a night mayor, and since then the concept has grown in popularity as cities attempt to foster vibrant nightlife economies, while balancing the needs of residents. Is this concept a good fit for Toronto? In a new Huffington Post Canada article, Music Canada’s Amy Terrill asks; Does Toronto Need A Night Mayor?  This piece follows Music Canada’s previous Huffington Post submission Making Music History Work For The Present.

For further information on the topic of Music Cities, you can download Music Canada and IFPI’s 2015 report The Mastering Of A Music City.

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Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly announces lineup for Canada Day celebrations in Ottawa

The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, has announced plans for a truly Canadian musical celebration on Canada Day in 2016. On July 1st, an eclectic collection of artists from across the country will perform on Parliament Hill for Canada’s 149th birthday.

The show will be hosted by music journalist Rebecca Makonnen and Toronto rapper Kardinal Offishall. The artists performing reflect Canada’s proud history of diversity, and the show promises to be a rocking fun time for Canadians and visitors of all ages.

The Canada Day Noon Show will take place from 12:00pm to 1:30pm. The show will be broadcast on many CBC platforms live, and will include performances by:

Our music is a major part of our national identity, so it’s very fitting to honour Canada’s birthday with some of our most interesting artists. Coleman Hell, from Thunder Bay, Ontario, was a 2016 JUNO Award nominee for “Breakthrough Artist of the Year.” His music is an infectious blend of electronic and folk-country. Winnipeg’s Indian City is an Indigenous pop band, and their Parliament Hill performance will feature guest vocals from JUNO Award-winning singer Jay Bodner of Eagle and Hawk. Béatrice Martin, better known by her stage name Cœur de Pirate, hails from Outremont, Québec. She sings in both French and English, and while she’s best known for her solo singer-songwriter work, she has also played keyboard and collaborated on multiple projects. Also performing are Canada’s pop-rock darlings Metric, who have won multiple JUNO and CASBY awards.

There will be a second Evening Show from 7:00pm to 10:45pm in Major’s Hill Park, which is located in the heart of downtown Ottawa, close to the National Gallery of Canada. This performance will feature Shawn Hook of British Columbia, Andie Duquette of Québec, and DJ Ilon of Ontario.

There are other events and activities taking place all over Ottawa and Gatineau throughout the day. A full guide of events is available on the Government of Canada’s Canada Day website.

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