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New Noise Bylaw illustrates City of Toronto’s commitment to supporting a vibrant music ecosystem through clear, objective standards

New bylaw procedures have been implemented by the City of Toronto to provide clearer standards regarding noise in the city. Bylaw amendments include a number of changes relating to amplified sound’ that have positive implications for the live music ecosystem, and provide clearer communication from the City to venue owners. These substantial amendments flow from an extensive research and consultation process led by the City of Toronto’s Municipal Licensing and Standards (MLS).

Music Canada applauds the City’s amendments to the bylaw, which signify a positive step forward, and demonstrate that the music community was a meaningful stakeholder in the deliberation process. As described in our groundbreaking report The Mastering of a Music City, it is critical for cities to implement measures that support the growth of a robust music economy. 

These amendments better recognize the crucial role the live music sector plays in making Toronto a vibrant and inclusive Music City. They also demonstrate the value the City sees in the live music industry, its impact on our local economy, and what it means for the improved quality of life for those living in Toronto and the surrounding area. In addition to the elimination of the old Noise Bylaw’s ‘general prohibition’ (which stated that “no one shall produce noise that disturbs anyone else, day or night”), the updated policies contain new musician-friendly standards including:

  • Quantitative decibel limits for amplified sound, giving venues a clear, objective standard against which to measure and manage their operations
  • An adjustment to point of measurement for decimal levels, which will now be measured from the point of reception (where the noise is heard) instead of the property line of the sound source (music venue, festival site, etc.). 

Policy-makers heard from a wide range of groups, including venue owners, festival operators, artists, residents’ associations, businesses, public health authorities, and other interested stakeholders. The Toronto Music Advisory Council (TMAC) – of which Music Canada was a core member – also played an important role in the process, providing critical input and recommendations regarding the reform of various noise-related regulations. 

“These changes signal the City’s growing recognition of our businesses and organizations – who add significantly to the heart beat of Toronto,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the Canadian Live Music Association. “Live music venues and events are significant economic and cultural assets. They animate neighbourhoods, enhance benefit to local businesses, create jobs and attract tourists. We expect the new noise bylaw to be clearer in terms of interpretation and application.”

These bylaw amendments were first approved by City Council in April, but the policy changes came into effect on October 1. To learn more about the City of Toronto’s new Noise Bylaw, visit https://www.toronto.ca/city-government/public-notices-bylaws/bylaw-enforcement/noise/.

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Release: Music Canada Announces New Executive Team Appointments

Restructuring, in concert with other recent initiatives, positions Music Canada to deliver on its new three-year strategic plan

Jackie Dean, newly-appointed Chief Operating Officer, Music Canada

Toronto, March 28, 2019:  Music Canada today announced the appointment of Jackie Dean to the newly created position of Chief Operating Officer and the promotion of two other senior team members to the organization’s executive team.

The appointments, in concert with recently announced changes to Music Canada’s Board of Directors and the creation of an Advisory Council, position the association to deliver on its new three-year strategic plan. Objectives set out in the plan include contributing to the enhancement of Canada’s music ecosystem; ensuring Music Canada is a great place to work for its talented and engaged team; and returning demonstrable value to its members while advancing their interests.

These actions are the product of a comprehensive governance review which, in addition to the new Advisory Council, has resulted in changes to Music Canada’s bylaws; the implementation of a diversity policy; and the addition of two new independent member positions to the Board of Directors, with the representation of women on the Board increased to 40 percent.

“The new appointments represent another important step in implementing the conclusions of our 2018 governance review,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO, Music Canada. “They demonstrate our commitment to promoting equity, diversity and inclusion, and to meeting our goals for accountability and transparency. The result is a streamlined organizational structure that positions us to achieve the objectives set by our Board.”

Henderson added, “The changes will also help Music Canada to achieve our goal of enhancing Canada’s music ecosystem in concert with our partners in the music community.”

In her new role, Dean, along with other members of the leadership team, will support Henderson in executing the organization’s strategic plan and driving its research, advocacy and community leadership activities.  

Dean joined Music Canada in June 2002 as Chief Financial Officer on a part-time basis, and will now be full-time in her new role. During this same period of time, she also served as COO of The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences/The JUNO Awards & MusiCounts, helping to build the four pillars of the organization’s mandate to Educate, Develop, Celebrate and Honour Canadian artists.

In addition to Dean’s appointment, Patrick Rogers has been promoted to Vice President, Corporate Affairs. Rogers joined Music Canada in May 2016 as Director, Regulatory Affairs, and in his new role, will lead Music Canada’s public policy and communications teams. Sarah Hashem has been appointed Vice President, Strategic Initiatives. Hashem joined Music Canada in June 2018 as Managing Director of the association’s Three Rs Music Program, and will now lead initiatives focusing on specific areas of the music community ecosystem including artist entrepreneur programs and Music City strategies.

“Music Canada has the right leadership, a strong team and an effective organizational structure to achieve the goals we have set for the next three years,” says Jennifer Sloan, Chair of Music Canada’s Board of Directors. “I am confident that their efforts will advance the interests of our members and the broader music community in Canada.”

Allan Reid, President and CEO, CARAS, The JUNO Awards and MusiCounts, remarked, “I thank Jackie for her tremendous contributions to our organization. CARAS, the JUNOS, MusiCounts and Canada’s music community have all benefited from Jackie’s leadership for more than 16 years. I look forward to working with her and strengthening our partnership with Music Canada as she begins a new leadership role in our industry.”

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For more information:
Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Amy Terrill addresses Auckland City of Music strategy launch

Aucklanders warmly welcomed Music Canada Executive Vice President, Amy Terrill, as the keynote speaker at their recent launch of the Auckland Music Strategy, Te Rautaki Puoro o Tāmaki Makaurau. Terrill provided an international perspective to the event, commenting on the growth of the Music Cities movement, Toronto’s experience, and providing some considerations for Auckland as it implements its three year strategy.

Read More: Auckland joins UNESCO creative cities network

The event, which took place at The Wintergarden, a venue within the historic Civic Theatre,  began with a Māori welcome speech and song, Miki whakatau & waiata, demonstrating the importance of music to the indigenous community,

“For Māori, music is a divine gift passed down by the gods.  It is embedded in traditional ceremony and preserves stories of the past.  These stories live on today, woven into our culture and city.”

Photo: Serene Stevenson

Other performers included Irene and Saia Folau.

Photo: Serene Stevenson

Auckland Council, one of the key partners in the initiative, was well represented with several elected councillors and key staff in the room and remarks by Mayor Phil Goff. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, unable to be there in person, expressed her support through a video message. PM Ardern recalled the first time she was “pitched” on the idea of Auckland as a UNESCO City of Music, and congratulated the industry and civic leaders who worked on the effort over the last two years.

Photo: Serene Stevenson

Photo: Serene Stevenson

The leading proponents of the initiative, Recorded Music NZ and APRA AMCOS, were represented in remarks by Anthony Healey.  The strategy cites Music Canada’s groundbreaking report, The Mastering of a Music City, and Healey noted the importance of this research in the steering committee’s efforts.

In her keynote remarks, Terrill congratulated Auckland on joining “the growing number of cities who are deliberately looking at ways to grow their music economy – many, like Auckland, recognizing a strong music community that has already been built organically.”

Photo: Serene Stevenson

She pointed to the value of the “network of cities, of music industry professionals, artists and academics – all who are sharing experience and wisdom to support these intentional efforts to grow the local music economy.”  

Throughout her remarks, Terrill provided concrete examples of strategies and tactics that have been deployed successfully in other parts of the world, some of which might be helpful for Auckland.  However, she was careful to point out that there is no “cookie cutter approach” and that the way the Auckland strategy is “rooted in what makes your city unique – the diversity of voices and sounds – your unique cultural identity, heritage and position in Australasia,” is very important.

“I see that the City of Auckland values the integration of arts and culture in everyday lives and is working to stimulate the participation of Aucklanders in the arts and employment in the creative sector.  I understand you aspire to be a city where “talent wants to live.” The development of this strategy and inclusion in the UNESCO Creative Cities network is a great first step,” Terrill said in closing. “Ngā mihi nui,” meaning I wish you well.

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The Three Rs Music Program needs your musical instrument donations for Ontario students

November 6, 2018, Toronto: Music Canada Cares is putting out a call to all greater Toronto and Hamilton area residents for donations of gently-used musical instruments for The Three Rs Music Program. The program is Rescuing musical instruments, Restoring them to fully functional condition at local repair shops across Ontario, and Reuniting them with students in Ontario’s publicly-funded schools.

“Please check your closets, storage lockers, and other dark places for any musical instruments you’re no longer using. Once donated, we’ll give these instruments a second life while increasing equitable access to music education in Ontario,” says Sarah Hashem, Managing Director of The Three Rs Music Program. “If you have an instrument collecting dust, please set it free and donate today!”

Instruments can be donated at the drop off points listed below before November 15:

Toronto

  • Music Canada, 85 Mowat Avenue, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm
  • Re:Sound Music Licensing, 1235 Bay Street Suite 900, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm
  • Toronto City Hall (Film & Entertainment Industries Office), 100 Queen Street West, Tues & Thurs 9:30am-5pm, Fri 12:30pm-5pm
  • Humber College, 3199 Lakeshore Blvd. West, Building A, Office 120E, Mon-Fri 10am to 4pm

Scarborough

  • Warner Music Canada, 155 Gordon Baker Road (call 416-456-9289 before drop off), Mon-Sun 10am-7pm

North York

  • Second Closet, 1500 Lodestar Road Unit 11, Mon-Sun 10am-7pm

East York

  • St John’s Music, 109 Vanderhoof Avenue, Mon-Sat 10am-6pm

Oakville

  • Oakville Naturopathic Wellness Centre, 2172 Wyecroft Rd, Mon-Thurs 8:30am-8:00pm, Fri 8:30am-2:30pm, Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

Hamilton

  • Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, 120 King St. W. Plaza Level, Mon-Fri 8:30am-4:30pm
  • Dr. Disc, 20 Wilson Street, Mon-Thurs & Sat 10am-6pm, Fri 10am-8pm, Sun 12pm-6pm

All instruments will be accepted except accordions, organs and pianos. To stay up-to-date as more drop off locations are announced visit the Music Canada Cares website.

Second Closet is the official storage and logistics partner for The Three Rs Music Program, and Second Closet customers can arrange pick up of musical instruments for donation when using the storage service at no extra cost.

At the end of the drive on November 15, Music Canada Cares will hold Let The Music Play, an instrument donation and celebration event in Toronto at 2nd Floor Events (461 King Street West). Garvia Bailey (broadcaster, arts journalist, and Three Rs Music Program Advisory Committee member) will host the event, which will also feature live performances, art installations, and DJ sets from Ian Campeau (DJ NDN, former member of A Tribe Called Red, and Three Rs Music Program Advisory Committee member) and Justin Peroff (Broken Social Scene). Tickets are $25 with all proceeds going to support the program, and are available through the event website.

If you have instruments to donate but are unable to access any of the drop off locations, please contact info@musiccanadacares.com.

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For more information:
Corey Poole, Music Canada Cares
cpoole@musiccanadacares.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Follow Music Canada Cares on Facebook and Twitter.

About Music Canada Cares
Music Canada Cares is non-profit organization focused on highlighting the extraordinary benefits of music to society. We are dedicated to advancing the quality and effectiveness of music education in the public-school system, engaging the public in support of music education, and celebrating the value of music and those who create it. Music Canada Cares is an affiliate of Music Canada.

About The Three Rs Music Program
The Three Rs Music Program—rescuing instruments, restoring them to a fully functional condition and reuniting them with students—is advancing the effectiveness of publicly funded music education programs across Ontario through musical instrument refurbishment, community appeals, and artist connections. Using a community-driven approach, we will be ensuring more students have access to the developmental, cognitive, and social benefits of music.

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The Three Rs Music Program Portal is now open

Schools across Ontario invited to apply for support for musical instrument programs

Publicly funded schools across Ontario are now invited to submit expressions of interest to The Three Rs Music Program for musical instrument repair grants of up to $2,500, and requests for refurbished instruments. The Three Rs Music Program Portal provides a one-stop location to facilitate requests and applications.

Administered by Music Canada’s new national affiliated non-profit, Music Canada Cares, The Three Rs Music Program aims to provide equitable access to quality music education by increasing the inventory of musical instruments in Ontario’s publicly funded schools, increasing public engagement in support of music education, and connecting students’ learning experience to various aspects of Canada’s dynamic music industry.

Qualified applicants to The Three Rs Music Program must:

  • Be part of the English or French public or Catholic school systems in Ontario
  • Currently employ a music teacher
  • Have a demonstrated need for instrument repair
  • Have the school Principal’s approval to submit an application

Through the portal, schools can identify what type of refurbished instruments are most needed for their program and enter up to 20 instruments in their possession requiring repair. They can also enter local repair shop information where the repairs are to be done in their community.

“We’re pleased to announce that our portal is accessible, bilingual and user-friendly,” says Sarah Hashem, Managing Director of The Three Rs Music Program. “We want to make a big impact for music education in the province in a short period of time, so we’re encouraging schools and educators across the province to seize this opportunity and apply early.”

Requests through the portal can be submitted until November 18, 2018. In addition to repair grants, The Three Rs Music Program conducts community instrument drives to collect gently-used instruments from Ontario communities. After a successful inaugural drive in Lindsay, the program is now accepting donations in the Greater Toronto Area.

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For more information:

Corey Poole, Music Canada Cares
cpoole@musiccanadacares.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Follow Music Canada Cares on Facebook and Twitter.

About Music Canada Cares

Music Canada Cares is non-profit organization focused on highlighting the extraordinary benefits of music to society. We are dedicated to advancing the quality and effectiveness of music education in the public-school system, engaging the public in support of music education, and celebrating the value of music and those who create it. Music Canada Cares is an affiliate of Music Canada.

About The 3 Rs Music Program

The Three Rs Music Program—rescuing instruments, restoring them to a fully functional condition and reuniting them with students—is advancing the effectiveness of publicly funded music education programs across Ontario through musical instrument refurbishment, community appeals, and artist connections. Using a community-driven approach, we will be ensuring more students have access to the developmental, cognitive, and social benefits of music.

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster. For more on Music Canada, please visit www.musiccanada.com

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Win a Vinyl or CD prize pack in our ‘Gold In Canada’ Back to School Contest!

Music Canada wants you to return to class with some fresh new vinyl in your collection from some of Canada’s favourite Gold-certified artists!

One lucky winner will receive our Grand Vinyl Bundle Prize, courtesy of Universal Music Canada, Sony Music Canada, and Warner Music Canada, which includes vinyl copies of:

  • Harry Styles Harry Styles
  • G Eazy The Beautiful & Damned
  • Arkells Morning Report
  • Lorde Melodrama
  • Khalid American Teen
  • Scott Helman Hotel D’Ville (featuring Gold single “PDA”)

Not too shabby, right?

If you’re not chosen as the Grand Prize winner, don’t fret! By entering the contest, you are also eligible to receive a CD prize pack of certified artists like Camila Cabello, Charlotte Cardin, P!nk, and more.

Each release included in the contest contains a track that has been certified #GoldinCanada by Music Canada. Every Thursday, Music Canada updates the Gold In Canada playlists on Spotify, Apple Music, and Google Play with 50 of the latest tracks earning the coveted Gold certification.

HOW TO WIN

    1. Follow Gold/Platinum Canada on Instagram and/or Twitter,
    2. Like the contest post,
    3. Tell us your favourite song certified #GoldinCanada this summer (hint: follow our playlist for the latest tracks, or visit the Gold/Platinum Canada database),
    4. Tag a friend that you listened to it with!

Don’t forget to ‘Like’ Gold/Platinum Canada on Facebook for more updates on the latest certified releases.

Click here to view the Official Contest Rules.

Contest closes at 11:59 PM EST on September 18, 2018.

 

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Rescuing, Restoring, and Reuniting Instruments in Gravenhurst, Ontario

On Sunday, August 5th, Music Canada introduced the Three Rs Music Program at the second annual Sawdust City Music Festival in Gravenhurst, Ontario. The new program, which is rescuing gently used instruments, restoring them to fully-functional condition, and then reuniting them with students in publicly funded schools across Ontario, will be fully operational this Fall.

Instruments were collected from artists and concert-goers at Music Canada’s booth in the festival’s Vendor Village at Gull Lake Rotary Park. Among the collected instruments were acoustic and electric guitars, as well as ukulele, fiddle, flute, and snare drum.

The instruments will be restored by Currie’s Music, a local vintage music and repair shop. Once the instruments are fully-functional, they will be made available to publicly funded schools in the Gravenhurst area.

Music Canada would like to thank all the festival attendees who generously donated their instruments. Additional opportunities for instrument donation will be announced soon.

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Breakthrough collaboration between Bell Media, Music Canada and Re:Sound creates international gold standard with music creators at its heart

 

Toronto, Dec 6, 2017: Advancements in cross-platform reporting have ushered in a new era of cooperation between Canada’s music and media industries. Developed by Bell Media, Music Canada and Re:Sound, the new process aligns terrestrial broadcast data with digital, ensuring all music industry stakeholders are served with efficiency, transparency, and accountability, while setting a new industry standard for data reporting. With this game-changing initiative by Bell Media, the automation of the existing music content distribution tool allows the industry to streamline sound recording data within the Canadian music ecosystem.

The new system is part of an ongoing project to develop administrative efficiencies by Music Canada and Re:Sound. Through consolidating multiple data sets, maximizing the use of ISRC (International Standard Recording Codes), and other improvements, the project has so far resulted in faster payouts and 28% more revenue for major labels and members of CIMA (the Canadian Independent Music Association).

Beginning with a successful pilot program of the new system by Toronto’s 104.5 CHUM FM in early 2017, Bell Media radio stations are now tracking complete sound recording data including ISRC automatically on new tracks from major record labels and independent label partners. With the elimination of manual processes, the new reporting system has resulted in cleaner data, which significantly benefits all rights holders in the Canadian music industry including artists, background musicians, songwriters, and music publishers, through organizations (SOCAN, CMRRA, SODRAC, etc.) relying on broadcast data to get royalties to rights holders.

“I commend Bell Media, and specifically Randy Lennox, for showing remarkable leadership on this project,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “Thanks to this collaboration, achievements in data efficiency from projects completed by the major record companies and Re:Sound will now yield even greater results, generating savings throughout the royalty chain, while resulting in more dollars in the pockets of creators.”

“As someone with love for Canada’s music industry, I am thrilled by the results of this project,” said Randy Lennox, President, Bell Media. “When Music Canada’s Graham Henderson approached us to help resolve what has been a longstanding issue within Canada’s music industry, it was an easy decision to lend Bell Media’s resources and expertise. The automation of the tracking process establishes international best practices that benefit creators while making the entire system considerably more efficient.”

“At Re:Sound, we only exist for the artists and sound recording owners we represent,” says Ian MacKay, President of Re:Sound. “Ensuring that the absolute best quality data flows through the entire music ecosystem is a huge step forward for rights holders, and will help us (and other organizations) to ensure that we pay the right people as quickly and efficiently as possible. We couldn’t have done this without the strong leadership of Bell Media and Music Canada.”

 

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For more information:

Siobhan Özege, Re:Sound
sozege@resound.ca
+1 (416) 968-8870 ext 369

Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Renee Dupuis-Macht, Bell Media
Renee.dupuismacht@bellmedia.ca
+1 (416) 384-3154

 

About Re:Sound
Re:Sound is the Canadian not-for-profit music licensing company dedicated to obtaining fair compensation for artists and record companies for their performance rights.  Re:Sound advocates for music creators, educates music users, licenses businesses and distributes public performance and broadcast royalties to creators – all to help build a thriving and sustainable music industry in Canada. For more on Re:Sound Music Licensing, please visit www.resound.ca

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster. For more on Music Canada, please visit www.musiccanada.com

 

About Bell Media
Bell Media is Canada’s leading content creation company with premier assets in television, radio, out-of-home advertising, and digital media. Bell Media owns 30 local television stations led by CTV, Canada’s highest-rated television network; 30 specialty channels, including TSN and RDS, and four pay TV services, including The Movie Network and Super Écran. Bell Media is also Canada’s largest radio broadcaster, with 215 music channels including 105 licensed radio stations in 54 markets across the country, all part of the iHeartRadio brand and streaming service. Bell Media owns Astral Out of Home with a network of more than 30,000 advertising faces in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Québec, and Nova Scotia. Bell Media also operates more than 200 websites; delivers TV Everywhere with its CraveTV and GO video streaming services; operates multi-channel network Much Digital Studios; produces live theatrical shows via its partnership with Iconic Entertainment Studios; and owns Dome Productions Inc., a multi-platform production company. Bell Media is part of BCE Inc. (TSX, NYSE: BCE), Canada’s largest communications company. For more on Bell Media, please visit www.bellmedia.ca.

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Music Canada calls on the Government of Canada to take steps to address the Value Gap in new, first-of-its-kind report

At its annual general meeting, Playback 2017, Music Canada today released The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach, the first comprehensive collection of information about the Value Gap, and the solutions available to Canadian policy makers.

The Value Gap is defined as the significant disparity between the value of creative content that is accessed and enjoyed by consumers, and the revenues that are returned to the people and businesses who create it.

“The Value Gap challenges the livelihood and sustainability of an entire global social class, and threatens the future of Canadian culture,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “Our creative industries and the Government of Canada need to come together to acknowledge that the problem facing our creators is real, that the landscape has dramatically changed, and that we need to adapt our rules and regulations before full-time creativity becomes a thing of the past.”

At the heart of the Value Gap for music is misapplied and outdated “safe harbour” provisions in copyright law, which result in creators having to forego copyright royalty payments to which they should be entitled, and amount to a system of subsidies to other industries.

Creators and governments around the world are taking notice, and taking action. The European Commission has pinpointed the Value Gap as the cause of a marketplace that isn’t functioning properly, and acknowledged that a legislative fix is needed. Hundreds of thousands of U.S. music creators have agreed that the safe harbour provisions in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act need to be changed.

In Canada, thousands of musicians, authors, poets, visual artists, playwrights and other members of the creative class, have urged The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, to put creators at the heart of future policy in a campaign called Focus On Creators.

The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach provides important insights into how policy makers can reverse the Value Gap. For instance, the Canadian Copyright Act contains provisions that allow and, in some cases, even encourage the commercialization of creators’ work without the need for proper remuneration, undercutting one of its overarching principles: to ensure that creators receive a just reward for the use of their works.

To address these inequities, the federal government should take the following actions:

  1. Focus on the Effects of Safe Harbour Laws and Exceptions

The Canadian government should, like its international counterparts, review and address safe harbour laws and exceptions, and their subsequent misapplication by some technology companies, as well as the cross-subsidies that have been added to the Copyright Act.

  1. Canada’s Creative Industries are Asking for Meaningful Reforms

During the mandated five-year review of the Copyright Act slated to begin in late 2017, the government should review the Act for instances that allow others to commercialize creative works without properly remunerating artists, and end these cross-subsidies.

  1. Remove the $1.25 Million Radio Royalty Exemption

Since 1997, commercial radio stations have only been required to pay $100 in performance royalties on their first $1.25 million advertising revenue. This exemption should be eliminated. It amounts to a subsidy being paid by artists to large vertically-integrated media companies.

  1. Amend the Definition of Sound Recording

In the Copyright Act, recorded music is actually not considered a ‘sound recording’ (and thus not entitled to royalties) when it is included in a TV or film soundtrack. The definition should be changed to allow performers and creators of recorded music to collect royalties when music is part of a TV/film soundtrack.

The full report can be downloaded at this link.

 

 

Music Canada demande au gouvernement du Canada de prendre des mesures pour remédier à l’écart de valeur dans un nouveau rapport pas comme les autres

Dans le cadre de son assemblée générale annuelle intitulée Playback 2017, Music Canada a annoncé aujourd’hui le lancement de L’Écart de valeur : ses origines, ses impacts et une démarche faite au Canada, le premier recueil de renseignements exhaustifs sur l’écart de valeur et les solutions qui sont à la portée des décideurs politiques canadiens pour y remédier.

L’écart de valeur se définit comme l’importante disparité qui existe entre la valeur du contenu créatif que les consommateurs consultent et apprécient, et les revenus qui sont réacheminés vers les personnes et les entreprises qui l’ont créé.

« L’écart de valeur menace le gagne-pain et la durabilité de toute une classe sociale à travers le monde et met en péril l’avenir de la culture canadienne », soutient Graham Henderson, président et chef de la direction de Music Canada. « Nos industries créatives et le gouvernement du Canada doivent s’unir pour reconnaître que le problème auquel sont confrontés nos créateurs est bien réel, que le paysage a profondément évolué et que nous devons adapter nos règles et règlements avant que la créativité à temps plein ne devienne chose du passé. »

L’écart de valeur tient essentiellement à l’application erronée de dispositions dépassées de la législation sur le droit d’auteur en matière d’exemptions de responsabilité (les safe harbours de la loi américaine) qui forcent les créateurs à sacrifier des redevances auxquelles ils devraient avoir droit, ce qui revient à un système de subventions accordées à d’autres industries.

Les créateurs et les gouvernements du monde entier réagissent et passent à l’action. La Commission européenne a identifié l’écart de valeur comme étant la cause du dysfonctionnement du marché, et elle a reconnu qu’une correction législative s’impose. Des centaines de milliers de créateurs de musique américains s’entendent pour réclamer la modification des exemptions de responsabilité de la loi américaine sur le droit d’auteur, le Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Au Canada, des milliers de musiciens, auteurs, poètes, artistes visuels, dramaturges et autres membres de la classe créative ont instamment prié l’honorable Mélanie Joly, ministre du Patrimoine canadien, de mettre les créateurs au cœur de la future politique culturelle dans le cadre d’une campagne nommée Pleins feux sur les créateurs.

L’Écart de valeur : ses origines, ses impacts et une démarche faite au Canada apporte un éclairage important sur les mesures que les décideurs politiques peuvent  prendre pour inverser l’écart de valeur. La Loi sur le droit d’auteur du Canada, par exemple, contient des dispositions qui permettent, et même encouragent dans certains cas, la commercialisation des œuvres des créateurs sans l’obligation de leur accorder une rémunération équitable, ce qui va à l’encontre d’un de ses principes fondamentaux : assurer que les créateurs reçoivent une juste récompense pour l’utilisation de leurs œuvres.

Le gouvernement fédéral devrait prendre les mesures suivantes pour remédier à ces inégalités :

  1. Se concentrer sur les effets des lois et des exceptions en matière d’exemption de responsabilité

À l’instar de ses homologues internationaux, le gouvernement du Canada devrait examiner et réviser les lois et exceptions en matière d’exonération de responsabilité, leur application erronée par certaines entreprises spécialisées dans la technologue et les pratiques d’interfinancement qui ont été ajoutées à la Loi sur le droit d’auteur.

  1. Les industries créatives canadiennes réclament des réformes authentiques

Lors de l’examen quinquennal de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur qui doit débuter à la fin de 2017, le gouvernement devrait étudier l’ensemble des dispositions permettant à des tiers de commercialiser des œuvres créatives sans rémunérer équitablement les artistes, et ce, en plus de mettre fin à l’interfinancement.

  1. Éliminer l’exemption de redevances de 1,25 million $ de la radio commerciale

Depuis 1997, les stations de radio commerciales ne versent qu’une redevance nominale de 100 $ sur la partie de leurs recettes publicitaires annuelles qui ne dépasse pas 1,25 million $. Cette exemption devrait être éliminée. Elle revient à une subvention faite par les artistes à de vastes entreprises médiatiques verticalement intégrées.

  1. Modifier la définition d’« enregistrement sonore »

Dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, la musique enregistrée n’est pas reconnue comme étant un « enregistrement sonore » (et n’ouvre donc pas droit à rémunération) lorsqu’elle fait partie de la bande sonore d’une œuvre télévisuelle ou cinématographique. La définition devrait être modifiée pour permettre aux artistes-interprètes et aux créateurs de musique enregistrée de toucher des redevances lorsque leur musique fait partie de la bande sonore d’une œuvre télévisuelle ou cinématographique.

On peut télécharger le rapport intégral à ce lien.

 

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Celebrate Canada Day 2017 with free live music across the country

Photo Credit: City of Calgary

As Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary of confederation, free and family-friendly celebrations featuring exciting musical performances are taking place all over the country.  From Deadmau5 in Halifax to Bruce Cockburn in Yellowknife, there is something for everyone this Canada Day weekend.

Toronto’s Queen’s Park Canada Day celebrations have been a tradition since 1967, and this year will feature artists like Ginger Ale and the Monowhales on top of fun activities, workshops, and meet and greets.  Exciting performances from the Barenaked Ladies, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and many more will be featured at Nathan Phillips SquareMel Lastman Square, Humber Bay Park West, and the Scarborough Civic Centre will also host amazing performances by local, national and international artists.

Canadian music legend Gordon Lightfoot will be joined by rising Canadian superstar Alessia Cara and many more for performances at Parliament Hill in Ottawa.  Meanwhile, Canadian acts like Ruth B will be playing at Major’s Hill Park and The Lost Fingers will be featured at the Canadian Museum of History.

To be followed by a fireworks celebration, the Old Port of Montreal will feature fun activities for families and musical acts like Charles Papasoff.  At another historic site, The Forks in Winnipeg, there will be fun and free programming taking place on five stages. Musical acts include the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and headlining duo Whitehorse.  Meanwhile, Sam Roberts Band will be one of many musical acts featured at Canada Place in Vancouver.

On Riverfront Avenue, in Calgary, Tegan and Sara are returning to their hometown to join a lineup including a Multicultural Orchestra and Inuit throat singers.  Alberta Legislature in Edmonton will feature artists at both a Diversity stage, showcasing the richness of Alberta’s cultural landscape, and a Discovered Stage, featuring performances from exciting musicians including another Edmonton native, Alyssa Reid.

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