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Posts by Quentin Burgess (181)

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Music Canada appears before Heritage Committee as part of Study on Challenges and Issues Faced by the Arts, Culture, Heritage and Sport Sectors During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Today, Patrick Rogers, interim co-CEO of Music Canada, appeared before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage as part of its comprehensive study on the challenges and issues faced by the Arts, Culture, Heritage and Sport sectors during the COVID-19 pandemic

In his remarks, Rogers spoke of the work that Music Canada has been doing since March – when the Canadian music industry was forced to cancel the JUNOs the same week as North American sports were shut down — and as Canadians stopped gathering in large numbers. At that time, Music Canada’s members directed us to focus our efforts and resources on helping the most vulnerable individuals in our industry: artists, crews and everyone working in the live music space. 

“To help ensure that Governments at all levels had accurate information to understand the Pandemic’s impacts and to develop effective relief measures, we partnered with Abacus Data to conduct national polling about how the pandemic was affecting artists and our fans,” said Rogers. 

That research included a national study that surveyed over 700 professional musicians, so we could better understand the impacts through their lens. 

“Here are some important numbers,” said Rogers. “The report found that professional musicians perform, on average, nearly 100 times a year, typically traveling across Canada and the world. 

Revenue generated from live performances in turn helps support an average of 11 other people, such as band members, technicians, and other industry jobs. And a staggering 85% of musicians agreed that without live performances, they will have difficulty earning enough to pay their bills. 

But the most important number is zero. Zero live shows. Zero festivals. Zero “gigs” as artists, fans and the industry understood them for generations.  With this in mind, we have spent the pandemic amplifying the voices of artists in settings like this and assisting colleagues and organizations like Erin Benjamin of the Canadian Live Music Association as they work to highlight the difficulties being faced by venues and the artists who play in them.”

Music Canada also commissioned a separate national survey of Canadians, with a first round released in May and an update in August. Those results were similarly startling. They underscored that the virus will keep Canadians, including identified music lovers, home long after they are allowed to attend events.

Rogers also spoke of the need for copyright reform. Last year, Music Canada and our industry colleagues came to the Heritage Committee to discuss the need for copyright reform. 

“Virtually the entire Canadian music industry asked that a few simple amendments be made to the Copyright Act to help ensure that artists are paid when their music is played,” said Rogers. “The report from this committee Shifting Paradigms provides a great roadmap to upholding that principle. I hope that this Committee and the Government will return to that work soon, because with the Pandemic eliminating opportunities to tour for artists – the fallacy that artists don’t need copyright protection has been exposed for the myth that it is,” said Rogers.

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Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing release new research report, Supporting Artist Entrepreneurs in the Evolving Music Economy

To help enable sustainable careers for artist entrepreneurs, Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing have released a new research report, titled Supporting Artist Entrepreneurs in the Evolving Music Economy.

The report summarizes the findings of a national research study of more than 300 artist entrepreneurs, conducted by Music Canada and CONNECT. The study shows that a lack of business and entrepreneurial training, as well as gaps in understanding of music sector structures, are key barriers to success for artists. 

“Too often overlooked in economic development conversations, artists are a remarkable segment of Canadian entrepreneurs who contribute to both the economic and cultural fabric of our society, and help create jobs for themselves and others in the Canadian music economy,” says Sarah Hashem, Music Canada’s Vice President, Strategic Initiatives. “According to the COVID-19 Artist Impact Survey we conducted with CONNECT earlier this year, each artist creates an average of 3.7 jobs. However, a gap exists in entrepreneurial support and training available to artists.”

The report identifies artists’ key business needs within an evolving music economy, outlines industry-wide strategies to promote artists’ business success, and makes recommendations that can be applied by government and artist-serving organizations to better support artists in sustaining their livelihoods through music. 

“Artist entrepreneurs represent more than 90% of CONNECT’s members, and the great majority of the creative middle class,” says Catherine Jones, Executive Director of CONNECT Music Licensing. “Like entrepreneurs in other fields, artists are creative, they are risk-takers, and they are job-creators. By supporting them with training and resources, we can help empower more artists to achieve their goals and earn a sustainable career.”

Music Canada and CONNECT have begun addressing some of the gaps with initiatives such as the Industry Insider Video Series. We hope the report can inspire artists serving organizations and government agencies to incorporate entrepreneurship and business  resources in their artist support offerings.

Download Report

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CEO Search

Are you infatuated with music and cultural arts?  Can you skillfully walk the tightrope between arts and commerce?  Music Canada is searching for a dynamic leader to shape the future of music in this country!

Reporting to the Board of Directors, the Chief Executive Officer will effectively lead the overall organization to achieve its mission of providing resources, support, and advocacy to Music Canada’s member organizations and their partners, the artists.

As the public figure and brand ambassador of Music Canada, we are looking for a dynamic CEO with a strong leadership presence that instills a sense of immediate trust. The music industry is undergoing incredible transformation requiring forward-thinking and strategically focused leadership.  With a combined passion for culture and a business leadership approach, the CEO will effectively lead the economic growth of this complex and vibrant industry.  Promoting and protecting the value of music and its production in Canada by strengthening legislative relationships in order to influence policy change will be at the forefront of priorities. Working in partnership with local and international affiliates and the Music Canada team, the CEO will create an ambitious vision that will lead the music business into a bright and successful future.

* Music Canada values diversity and is committed to inclusion in all areas, every day.

To learn more about this role, please contact our Search Partner, Sandra Wrycraft: sandra@findinc.ca

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Government announces details of Canada Recovery Benefit to support Employed and Self-Employed Individuals Impacted by COVID-19

The Government of Canada has announced details of the Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB), which provides income support to employed and self-employed individuals who are directly affected by COVID-19 and are not entitled to Employment Insurance (EI). The program is administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). 

Applications are now open at https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/benefits/recovery-benefit.html. Applicants may apply for a retroactive period dating back to September 27, 2020.

Eligible applicants can receive $1,000 ($900 after taxes withheld) for a 2-week period. If your situation continues past 2 weeks, you will need to apply again. Applicants may apply up to a total of 13 eligibility periods (26 weeks) between September 27, 2020 and September 25, 2021.

Who is eligible? 

Full eligibility criteria is available on the Government of Canada website.

To be eligible for the CRB, applicants must meet all the following conditions for the 2-week period they are applying for:

  • During the period you’re applying for:
    • you were not working for reasons related to COVID-19

Or

    • you had a 50% reduction in your average weekly income compared to the previous year due to COVID-19
  • You did not apply for or receive any of the following:
    • Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit (CRSB)
    • Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit (CRCB)
    • short-term disability benefits
    • workers’ compensation benefits
    • Employment Insurance (EI) benefits
    • Québec Parental Insurance Plan (QPIP) benefits
  • You reside in Canada
  • You were present in Canada
  • You are at least 15 years old
  • You have a valid Social Insurance Number (SIN)
  • You earned at least $5,000 (before deductions) in 2019, 2020, or in the 12 months before the date you apply from any of the following sources:
    • employment income
    • self-employment income
    • maternity and parental benefits from EI or similar QPIP benefits
  • You have not quit your job or reduced your hours voluntarily on or after September 27, 2020
  • You were seeking work during the period, either as an employee or in self-employment
  • You have not turned down reasonable work during the 2-week period you’re applying for

What are the eligibility periods?

Each Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB) eligibility period is a specific 2-week period. The first period is September 27, 2020 to September 25, 2021.

The CRB does not renew automatically. You must apply for each period between September 27, 2020 and September 25, 2021 separately. You can apply for a maximum of 13 periods out of the total 26 periods available. The 13 periods do not have to be taken consecutively.

You may start applying on the Monday after the 2-week period has ended. If your situation continues, you must re-apply for another 2-week period. You may apply for benefits retroactively for any period up to 60 days after that period has ended.


How do I apply? 

Details about when and how to apply will be made available on October 12, 2020. The easiest way to apply will be online through CRA My Account. Applicants can prepare to apply by completing this questionnaire on the government website


I am receiving some income from royalties for my work; does this mean I am ineligible for the CRB?

You may earn employment or self-employment income while you receive the CRB. If you earn more than $38,000 in the calendar year, you will have to reimburse $0.50 of the CRB for every dollar of net income you earned above $38,000 on your income tax return. If your net income is $38,000 or less, you will not have to reimburse the CRB. 


Where can I find more information on the CRB?

For more information on the CRB, including how and when to apply, eligibility period dates, and tax information, visit the government website at https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/benefits/recovery-benefit.html. For questions, contact the CRA through your CRA My Account, or by phone at the numbers listed at https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/benefits/recovery-benefit/crb-contact.html

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Jackie Dean, Music Canada’s COO/Interim co-CEO, named Chair of the CCMA Board of Directors

Today, at the Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) Annual General Meeting, the CCMA announced their 2020-21 Board of Directors. 

Music Canada would like to congratulate our COO/Interim co-CEO Jackie Dean on being named Chair of the CCMA Board. Your vision and leadership will be a great asset to Canada’s country music community. 

“I am honoured to step into a new role as Chair of the Canadian Country Music Association Board of Directors,” said Jackie Dean. “This is a challenging year for so many in the country music community, as all aspects of the music ecosystem are impacted by the effects of the pandemic. The CCMA Board, staff, and members have shown their ingenuity and resilience in pivoting seamlessly to a virtual Country Music Week that celebrates our great artists. I look forward to working with the CCMA team and fellow Board members to continue to build upon the CCMA’s foundation of educating, elevating and celebrating Canadian talent.”

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Town Hall Invitation: Share your recovery measures ideas with Minister of Canadian Heritage, Steven Guilbeault

Dear members and music industry stakeholders, 

Canadian Heritage, in collaboration with ADISQ, CIMA and Music Canada, would like to invite you to a virtual town hall on September 9, 2020, from 3 to 4 p.m. EST. This event is an opportunity for you to share your ideas with the Minister of Canadian Heritage, the Honourable Steven Guilbeault, on recovery measures that would ensure the music sector’s economic recovery in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stuart Johnston, CIMA President and Solange Drouin, ADISQ Public Affairs Vice-President and General Director, will be moderating the meeting in both official languages. Participants are encouraged to speak in the language of their choice as simultaneous interpretation and closed captioning will be available during the town hall.

REGISTRATION 

Ahead of this town hall, participants are invited to submit their ideas and suggestions regarding the recovery measures that should be taken by the government.

Click here to register and submit your suggestions.

Panelists will be invited in advance to speak to their specific recommendations during the town hall.

You can register any time before the event.  If you would like to be considered to present your ideas during the town hall, please submit your comments by 5.p.m. September 1st through the registration link above.

Individuals and organizations are invited to propose recovery measures that meet some or all of the pillars of the framework developed by Canadian Heritage:

  • Foster the sustainability of the arts and culture ecosystem by ensuring more stable sources of income for organizations and better remuneration for artists, creators and cultural workers;
  • Increase demand for Canadian art, productions and cultural products;
  • Increase the number of people from under-represented and equity-seeking groups who can earn a living through the creation and production of art and culture, including in leadership and leadership positions;
  • Reduce the ecological footprint of arts, culture, and heritage.

For any questions, please contact Erica Meekes at emeekes@musiccanada.com.

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Public Research Findings: Threat to live music extended as more Canadians to avoid public events for longer

August 10, 2020, Toronto: Music Canada commissioned Abacus Data to conduct public opinion research to determine how the music industry is being impacted by Canadians’ changing feelings around music, during the pandemic. The second round of the national public opinion survey found that an increasing number of Canadians are concerned about COVID-19, and a growing number of them plan to avoid public events even after restrictions are lifted, resulting in a longer threat to live music.

“The ongoing triple threat facing the live music industry, and all mass gathering industries, requires government action,” said Patrick Rogers, Interim co-Chief Executive Officer. “This threat includes the medical concerns that Canadians have about the virus, that government restrictions on large gatherings will remain well into recovery, and that even after government restrictions are lifted, confidence in returning to live events will continue to be low.”

“Live music was one of the first sectors impacted by the pandemic, and it will continue to feel the impacts long after restrictions are lifted,” continued Rogers. “Artists, venues and support staff will require further support long after other elements of the economy have reopened.”

Concern among Canadians about the pandemic remains elevated, with more believing that “the worst is yet to come” than did in April. The research shows that even as economies begin to slowly re-open, more Canadians expect to stay away from live music events long after physical distancing restrictions are lifted. Even those who regularly attended live music events before the pandemic, 55% said that they will wait at least 6 months or longer to attend a music festival after physical restrictions end – and for large concert venues, it was 60%. Perceptions of risk for attending these types of events are rising over time – instead of declining. The findings ultimately point to the prolonged threat faced by the live music industry.

“This research confirms that Canadians continue to worry about the health impacts of COVID-19. While both artists and fans dearly miss the live music experience, it is clear that ongoing concerns about the virus will continue to significantly impact live events well into 2021,” said Jackie Dean, Music Canada’s Interim co-Chief Executive Officer. “The results show that certain safety measures will help attract some live music lovers back to live events – but many will remain hesitant.” 

Many Canadians want to get back to enjoying live music when it’s safe to do so. As the pandemic continues, the research found that self-identified “live music lovers” now miss live music even more than they did in April. 90% of respondents in this group now say “I really miss going to concerts” – and 89% of this group agree that digital content will never replace the feeling of seeing live music (an increase of 5% from polling conducted at the end of April). 

This research builds upon Abacus Data’s findings from earlier in the pandemic. In May, Abacus’ national public opinion survey identified the triple threat the music industry faces in its recovery from the impacts of COVID-19. 

Music Canada also commissioned Abacus Data to conduct national research that explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through the experience of Canada’s artists. That research found that professional musicians are feeling increasing pressure as a result of the pandemic, due to a reduction in income and their ability to produce music that threatens their ability to survive.

“The pandemic has had a devastating impact on artists’ ability to perform, to create, and to earn a living from their music,” said Miranda Mulholland, artist and Chair of the Music Canada Advisory Council. “While the findings are bleak, this series of research is providing valuable insights for artists, industry, and government as we look for safe ways to return to work. It is clear that artists and those who work closely with them in the live performance space will need further support as the economy begins to reopen.”

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-threat-pandemic-music-canada/.

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Press pause: COVID-19 strategies for artists – On-Demand Webinar

The music industry is confronting particularly harsh and long-term challenges in the wake of the global pandemic. Cancelled and postponed concerts and tours have led to a dramatic drop in revenue. That being said, the demand for streamed music and performances could not be stronger, with people looking for comfort and content as they isolate at home.

To provide insight into the many legal issues that surround this widespread industry upheaval, Gowling WLG’s Entertainment and Sports Law Group – in partnership with CONNECT Music Licensing and Music Canada – recently presented a live Q&A webinar.  Featuring Susan Abramovitch, head of Gowling WLG’s Entertainment and Sports Law Group, Catherine Jones, executive director of CONNECT Music Licensing, and moderated by Miranda Mulholland, JUNO-nominated artist and advocate, the panel discussed timely and important topics for artists, including:

  • Protecting copyright in your works
  • Music licensing
  • Royalty collection

Video from the webinar is now available, and is embedded below. 

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Canadian musicians, please take the time to fill out this survey

Music Canada has partnered with Abacus Data to get artists’ perspectives on returning to work during the COVID-19 recovery phase. We believe that it is important for governments and the industry as a whole to understand how artists feel about returning to venues and festivals while COVID-19 remains a health concern.

Data from this study will be added to consumer data that Music Canada is gathering to give all decision makers a complete picture of the recovery phase.

English

Français

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Music Monday @ Home shines a spotlight on the importance of equitable access to music education

Today marks Music Monday, an annual event in which thousands of Canadians come together in song and in support of music education. Hosted by the Coalition for Music Education, Music Monday unites musicians in communities from coast to coast to make a powerful statement about the importance of equitable access to quality music education for all students. This year, the celebration will move online with Music Monday @ Home, allowing all Canadians to participate safely while practicing social distancing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Each year on Music Monday, students, educators, and music makers from across the country participate in the collective singing of the Music Monday Anthem, an original song written by a Canadian artist. This year’s anthem is “Hymn to Freedom,” the iconic civil rights anthem by Oscar Peterson and Hariette Hamilton, in a new bilingual translation. Resources to perform the anthem, including sheet music, lyrics, and translations are available on the Coalition website.

“Music Monday celebrates the power of music, and the importance of music education. Equitable access to music education is important to Music Canada, which is why we have partnered with the Coalition for Music Education, the Canadian Music Educators Association, MusiCounts / CARAS, People For Education, and the Canadian Network Arts and Learning on a national study to assess the state of music education in every province and territory,” said Sarah Hashem, Vice President, Strategic Initiatives at Music Canada. “This research will help all stakeholders to better understand the state of K-12 Music Education from region to region, and to provide information to support its future growth and development.”

Music Monday @ Home begins at 9am EST, with a series of regional broadcasts, including live performances, messages from prominent Canadians, interactive activities for children of all ages, and more. To join in the celebration and add your voice, tune into the Coalition’s YouTube channel and Facebook page.

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