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Posts by Siobhan Özege (22)

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Music Canada Proud to Support 45th Annual JUNO Awards

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Music Canada is proud to return as the sponsor of the Album of the Year Award at the 45th Annual JUNO Awards.

“Music Canada is proud to work alongside record labels who invest in great Canadian talent by helping them create an album, develop as artists, and build a passionate fan base. This kind of support gives Canadian artists what it takes to not only break into the international market – but as we saw in 2015 – rule it,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada.

“A strong music industry positions us well on the global stage, builds our brand, and draws the world to our borders through music tourism. A vibrant music sector contributes economically, socially and culturally to local communities and the country at large. There is an incredible depth and diversity for music in Canada – it’s one of our greatest exports.”

This year’s nominees for Album of the Year are:

  • Drake – If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late
  • Jean Leloup – A Paradis City
  • Justin Bieber – Purpose
  • Shawn Mendes – Handwritten
  • The Weeknd – Beauty Behind the Madness

The Album of the Year Award will be presented at The 2016 JUNO Awards Broadcast on CTV at The Scotiabank Saddledome in Calgary on Sunday, April 3.

 

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Quoted: BC Music Fund Announcement

Last month, at an event at the historic Warehouse Studios in Vancouver, Premier Christy Clark announced a $15 million grant towards the creation of a BC Music Fund, which will be administered by Creative BC. The event also included remarks from Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson, Jon Garson, President and CEO of the BC Chamber of Commerce, Diamond-certified artist Michael Bublé, and Scott Johnson, Chair of Music BC. A selection of quotes and video from the event are available below:

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“Music, as it turns out, doesn’t just drive our culture, but our economy. We now understand that thriving music scenes attract and retain young talented workers and the businesses that employ them. Music, in effect, can be the glue that holds our communities together.” – Graham Henderson, President & CEO, Music Canada

 

“No matter who you are, no matter how young, how old, no matter how esoteric your art may be, we want you to have a chance to succeed in British Columbia. And we want you to know that our province supports and is passionate about what you are doing in the way that you are changing the place that we live.” - Premier Christy Clark

“No matter who you are, no matter how young, how old, no matter how esoteric your art may be, we want you to have a chance to succeed in British Columbia. And we want you to know that our province supports and is passionate about what you are doing in the way that you are changing the place that we live.” – Premier Christy Clark

 

“Thanks to you Premier, people who want to pursue a music career here will be able to do so and not have to leave home, which is pretty incredible. I mean, for a long time, people have had to go to Ontario if they want to be able to afford to make the record…Truly, it’s never been tougher to develop a career as an artist. The 15 million dollars that Premier Clark has committed to this industry, is going to help that BC does everything it takes to make a thriving and strong music scene.” - Micheal Bublé

“Thanks to you Premier, people who want to pursue a music career here will be able to do so and not have to leave home, which is pretty incredible. I mean, for a long time, people have had to go to Ontario if they want to be able to afford to make the record…Truly, it’s never been tougher to develop a career as an artist. The 15 million dollars that Premier Clark has committed to this industry, is going to help that BC does everything it takes to make a thriving and strong music scene.” – Micheal Bublé

 

“All children need the opportunity to express themselves through music as part of their education, and know that this is a viable career path for them.” - Jon Garson, President & CEO, BC Chamber of Commerce

“All children need the opportunity to express themselves through music as part of their education, and know that this is a viable career path for them.” – Jon Garson, President & CEO, BC Chamber of Commerce

 

“I’ve often thought, this is the Nashville of the North…it’s time we stand up and represent ourselves as such.” - Scott Johnson, President, Music BC

“I’ve often thought, this is the Nashville of the North…it’s time we stand up and represent ourselves as such.” – Scott Johnson, President, Music BC

 

Mother Mother performs.

Mother Mother performs.

 

 

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Re:Sound to take Tariff 8 ruling to Federal Court of Appeal

Paying artists a fraction of what their music is worth is not okay.

On Wednesday, February 24 our colleagues from Re:Sound will take the Copyright Board’s Tariff 8 ruling to the Federal Court of Appeal as they continue to fight against low streaming royalty rates. The court is judicially reviewing the Copyright Board’s decision from May 2014 that gave artists the incredibly low rate of 0.000102 per play on some digital streaming services.

Tariff 8 is disastrous for two important reasons:

  • The Copyright Board threw out commercially negotiated rates – where the marketplace of ‘willing seller and willing buyer’ decided what was
  • The Copyright Board set a rate approximately 10% of what was freely negotiated in the marketplace and a rate that is less than 10% of comparable US rates.

What does this mean in practical terms?

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Said another way, it means that real people can’t make a living.  The musicians and artists who work every day to make music in Canada are going to be even more impoverished and not paid fairly for the use of their work. According to a study by CIMA, the average income of a Canadian musician is only $7,228 per year from music-related activities.

The reality in the market is that sales of CDs and even downloads are declining, while music streaming is on the rise. That’s why it is so important that artists are fairly compensated for their work in the context of web-based services.

Streaming services demonstrate innovation in the music industry. The music industry is going into new spaces and doing things differently in light of a rapidly changing marketplace. But innovation only goes so far. The Board is at the heart of the problem for music creators.  It continues to set rates based on antiquated ideas that have no place in the current music landscape.

It took them six years to set Tariff 8 and they continue to move at a glacial pace on issues of critical importance to Canada’s economy.  Urgent action is needed to change the Copyright Board.

Tariff 8 sets the standard for streaming rates going forward.  So, while some may argue that services such as CBC Music, Stingray, and Slacker aren’t an artist’s only source of income or that this is only for some streaming services, the rates are appallingly low.

Artists deserve to be fairly compensated for their music. The Tariff 8 decision sends a message that music is not properly valued as a profession here, and this message is completely inconsistent with Canadian values.

The people whom we elect to solve these problems know all about the issues at the Copyright Board.  In 2014, right after the Tariff 8 decision was released, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage released a report on the Canadian Music Industry.  In fact, their #1 recommendation in their study was figure out how to make changes to it.

Minister Dion, at the time was so frustrated with the issues at the Copyright Board that he said that there is an urgent need for action and that, “the government and the Board would be perfectly able to fix things in the coming months if they only started now.”

We agree, Minister Dion.  We are supporting Re:Sound this week as they fight the Copyright Board’s Tariff 8 decision which has disastrous implications for the future of music in Canada.

We remain committed to this important issue, and to working with government on fixing the problems at the Copyright Board so this doesn’t happen again.

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Premier Clark announces new $15M BC Music Fund

Today we thank Premier Clark and the Government of British Columbia on their announcement to dedicate a $15 million grant to support the creation of a BC Music Fund as part of a comprehensive strategy to protect and promote the province’s music industry.

“This is an historic day for the province,” says Graham Henderson, President & CEO of Music Canada. “The creation of a BC Music Fund as part of a fulsome strategy to strengthen the province’s music industry, will enhance BC’s competitiveness as a location for the production and presentation of music. The BC Music Fund will help music businesses produce, distribute, promote, and stage the province’s emerging and well-known artists. It will allow the province to retain its deep inventory of talented music professionals, and create new opportunities for jobs and investment, contributing to a more diversified economy.”

Premier Christy Clark announced the $15 million grant as part of the launch of Music Canada’s report, BC’s Music Sector: From Adversity to Opportunity, at Vancouver’s Warehouse Studios. The event also included remarks by Michael Bublé, Jon Garson, President & CEO of the BC Chamber of Commerce and Scott Johnson, Chair of Music BC.

“B.C. is one of Canada’s leading centres for music with talented musicians in every corner of the province,” says Premier Clark. “Our record labels, recording studios, concert venues and music festivals draw people from all over the province, the country and the world. Music develops culture, promotes talent and diversifies our strong and growing economy.”

BC’s Music Sector: From Adversity to Opportunity was prepared by Music Canada after interviews and consultations with more than 100 individuals in BC’s music sector, the broader business community, municipal and provincial governments, provincial agencies, and community leaders.

The report highlights British Columbia’s wealth of music talent and the factors that have put these assets at risk. The report encourages decisive action on the part of the provincial government, municipalities, and music stakeholders to put BC’s music sector firmly back on the map and secure the benefits it can generate.

“The landscape and culture in BC has always been a huge catalyst in my creative process,” says Ryan Guldemond of Mother Mother who performed at the event. “It’s where we came together as a band, and where we’ve cultivated our creative community. There is an incredible wealth of talent here, and until now, the resources and infrastructure haven’t been able to properly support and elevate the art that is constantly being created. It’s incredibly heartening to see the powers that be sit up and take notice of the cultural and economic benefit the BC music industry provides for our province. Dedicating more resources to this sector will have a lasting positive impact on our cultural landscape.”

BC’s Music Sector: From Adversity to Opportunity is available at http://musiccanada.com/resources/research/bcs-music-sector-from-adversity-to-opportunity.

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First-ever study of live music in Ontario is released

Live - Newsletter Banner - 800x457 for Mailchimp - RGBToday, Music Canada releases the first comprehensive study of the live music industry in Ontario. Live Music Measures Up: An Economic Impact Analysis of Live Music in Ontario provides critical data and information that will help guide decision-making within the sector, in government and other allied stakeholders.

“This report provides a comprehensive picture of the benefits live music brings to Ontario. In fact, it only enhances our understanding of data collected in our 2012 economic impact study, and cements what we know about Ontario as a powerhouse for the music industry. It shows that a vibrant music scene drives value in many important ways, including job creation, tourism development, brand building and artistic growth. With the new data from this study, we now have the necessary benchmarks to measure and support its growth. Live Music Measures Up allows us to look at live music through a new lens, and to better understand how critical it is to the entire music ecosystem.” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada.

Erin Benjamin, Executive Director of Music Canada Live, participated in today’s launch. “Measuring Live Music represents an historic, timely and monumental opportunity; one which will enable us to entrench the true value of the live music economy in the minds of our stakeholders, government and audiences alike. It’s inspiring to see the sector organize, work together and build on the momentum we can all feel – here in the Province and around the world – the kind that will help guarantee live music takes its rightful place as one of Ontario’s greatest natural resources,” says Benjamin.

Prior to this study, there existed no comprehensive data set on Ontario’s live music industry. Music Canada engaged Nordicity to complete the profile, which they did after conducting interviews and surveys of artist managers, promoters, agents, music venues, and festivals in the province. The study was completed in partnership with Ontario’s Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, and with the financial support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation through the Ontario Music Fund.

In 2012, Music Canada studied the economic impact of the sound recording industry in Canada utilizing 2010 Statistics Canada data. The new data collected for Live Music Measures Up provides a more fulsome and detailed look at the live music sector in Ontario. A more comprehensive data set is necessary to understanding where the live music sector is, has been, and will be in the future. This report will provide necessary benchmarks to understand and support the sector’s future growth.

The economic profile is organized into four key areas: revenue, audience, economic impact, and future outlook. The key takeaways are as follows:

  • Revenue: Live music companies in Ontario generated $628 million in revenue from live music activities in 2013 as well as profits of $144 million. Artist management revenue from Canadian artists totalled $34 million in 2013, 54 percent of all artist management revenue, and Canadian artists generated $75 million in ticket sales.
  • Audience: In 2013, 558 festivals across Ontario sold a total of 15.7 million tickets, representing 7 million unique visitors. Ontario’s 616 venues have a combined capacity of 3.6 million. The 775 promoters operating in the province in 2013 promoted 81,600 shows, which sold a combined total of 5.4 million tickets.
  • Economic Impact: The total economic impact of live music in Ontario’s economy is $1.2 billion. Live music companies in Ontario were responsible for $484 million in total expenditure in 2013 and contributed $432.4 million in taxes to all levels of government combined. The economic impact of live music companies includes 10,500 full-time equivalent jobs, and tourism activity accounts for an additional 9,520.
  • Future Outlook: Survey respondents reported that access to tax credits and other forms of government funding, along with the availability of local Canadian talent, were the factors that most positively impacted their company growth. And 83 percent of live music companies in the province expect revenue growth within the next two years.

“Live music is a powerful force, and we thank Music Canada for their leadership in helping to quantify the extraordinary work of the sector,” adds Benjamin.

Download the full report here.

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First-ever study of live music in Ontario to be released on Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Ontario’s live music industry is thriving, and for the first time, we have measured and recorded data that captures just how large of an impact it’s having in the province.

As some of our long-time readers may remember, in 2014 Music Canada – with the support of the Government of Ontario’s Ontario Music Fund – asked Nordicity to develop a profile and conduct an economic impact analysis of the live music industry in Ontario. Through this survey, we have been able to create a profile that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing this community, while also providing it with a critical tool that will assist individual and cooperative efforts to grow the industry.

On December 8th, 2015, we will release a study that is the first of its kind in the province. Live Music Measures Up: An Economic Impact Analysis of Live Music In Ontario is a comprehensive look at Ontario’s live music sector. We asked the music community to stand up and be counted. Through a partnership with Nordicity, they have conducted research and interviews with artist managers, promoters, agents, music venues, and festivals from across the province to explore and better understand the revenue, audience, and economic impact of the sector.

The economic profile is organized into four key areas: revenue, audience, economic impact, and future outlook.

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Stay tuned via Twitter by following #MeasuringLiveMusic, or visit www.musiccanada.com for the report’s release on December 8.

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Music City Focus comes to Melbourne

The first ever Melbourne Music Symposium, which takes place later this week, will feature a presentation by Music Canada’s Amy Terrill on The Mastering of a Music City report.

Terrill is one of three keynote speakers during a sold-out full-day symposium that will gather key elected officials, staff and music community leaders, as well as some of the preeminent thinkers on music strategy from around Australia.  The day will include four workshops designed to produce tangible outcomes for Melbourne as it continues to set a gold standard when it comes to engaging the local music community in the development of comprehensive music strategies.

The day will begin with an address by The Right Honourable Lord Mayor Robert Doyle and end with closing comments by Councillor Rohan Leppert, Chair of Arts and Culture Portfolio.

In addition to the symposium, Terrill will participate in the Face the Music conference which immediately follows in Melbourne, as well as meetings in Sydney.

For more information on Melbourne’s Music Symposium, read here.

For more information about Sydney’s Face the Music, read here.

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The first economic impact analysis of live music in Ontario to be released in November

The live music industry in Ontario is thriving, and continues to position itself as a growing industry relative to the wider music industry. It has wide reaching economic benefits, and is a major source of income for artists at all stages of their careers. At a time of increased investment and international success, the industry is seeking to take the next steps to develop its capacity, increase growth, and effectively harness its strengths. It is in this spirit, that we’re excited to announce the forthcoming economic profile of live music companies operating in Ontario.

As some of our long-time readers may remember, in 2014, Music Canada – with the support of the Government of Ontario’s Ontario Music Fund – asked Nordicity to develop a profile and conduct an economic impact analysis of the live music industry in Ontario. This study is the first of its kind in the province. Through this survey, we have been able to create a profile that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing this community, while also providing it with a critical tool that will assist individual and cooperative efforts to grow the industry.

We asked the music community to stand up and be counted. Nordicity conducted research and interviews with artist managers, promoters, agents, music venues, and festivals from across the province to explore and better understand the revenue, audience, and economic impact of the sector. It is with this research that the study hopes to identify new lines of business, new jurisdictions, factors to facilitate growth, and potential or existing barriers to growth.

“We can’t wait to share – for the first time – data that attests to the growing success of Ontario’s live music industry. Live music contributes to the livelihoods of so many Ontarians – from promoters, to artist managers, to hotels and restaurants. Venues and festivals of all sizes and in all contexts, in communities large and small, provide critical opportunities for artists to develop and benefit from live performance.  And in turn, the depth of our live music offering fuels tourism in Ontario  Our soon-to-be-released report will put numbers behind these statements while also identifying opportunities for further growth,” said Music Canada’s VP Public Affairs Amy Terrill.

Stay tuned for a release of the full report in November.

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Toronto Mayor John Tory speaks at 2015 Music Canada Annual General Meeting

Yesterday we had the pleasure of not only coming together with our peers in the industry for the Music Canada AGM, but to host a number of wonderful speakers on the subject of Music Cities. Since the release of our report The Mastering of a Music City in June 2015, we have passionately pursued this subject around the world, learning from our colleagues in more than 40 cities. Yesterday it was especially special to talk about what Toronto is doing at home, with our own “music-friendly mayor” and champion of the music city: Mayor John Tory.

John Tory - Graham Henderson

In last year’s municipal election, Mayor Tory had a music platform that included tourism, enhanced live performances and festivals, and a standalone music office. Now, nine-months into his term, many of those things have become a reality in a short period of time. In a candid conversation with Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson, Mayor Tory spoke about the strides we’ve made so far, what’s next, and what inspires him in his vision of a music city.

We asked whether he remained optimistic about continuing to see this music platform develop – he looked to his trip to Austin, saying: “I stand here more committed because I’ve now seen another place where they made this a success – and we aren’t going to be Austin. We’re different. But I’m encouraged…and I think we’ve got to put our energy…with perhaps getting some more help behind making some of this stuff happen.”

Looking at Austin, he realized that “when the city is fully committed to all aspects of music, and the performance of music, and to the attraction of musicians to the city…they got great things done…It had gigantic economic benefits for the city that went way beyond the jobs created by the music industry and spoke to the whole question of the attraction of global companies, technology companies and so on.”

This is a vision he has for Toronto: seeing the same kind of support rallied around music in the same way as we have done for film for the past 30 years.

According to the Mayor, “we have all of the ingredients here” to build this. He elaborated, saying that the music industry is further ahead of where film was 30 years ago, but that we haven’t yet fully pulled together the industry and the infrastructure. He committed support from the government, saying they could provide support “by way of helping to make opportunities available, helping to showcase, helping to facilitate things, helping to modernize regulations, and secondly, helping by sort of getting out of the way.” In recognizing the ongoing struggle against bureaucratic red tape, he said “if you’re really committed to being a music city, you have to put your money where your mouth is.”

His determination was clear – “I’m very determined at the end of 4 years…when my term happens to be up, that we can look back and say: we actually got something done here, moving us towards what we are in film, and what we can be for sure in music…It starts with yes, the regulatory framework that is better defined and better accommodating of music, but it also starts with an administration that…says we’re going to find a way to say yes as opposed to automatically saying no. And I think that’s going to be big and…start to come next year with the plans people have to do bigger things. They’re going to be a little bolder because we’ve got to be bolder, we have to find places to do bigger and more things…it’s all part of building a great city.”

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Jeffrey Remedios Named President and CEO of Universal Music Canada, Randy Lennox Departs for Bell Media

The Canadian music industry has seen a major development today with the change in leadership at Universal Music Canada.

Randy Lennox has been appointed the President of Entertainment & Broadcasting at Bell Media. Having most recently served as the President and CEO of Universal Music Canada, Randy will bring more than 25 years of music industry experience to this newly-created position at Bell Media, where he will oversee all English and French radio and local television broadcasting and their associated digital assets.  Randy leaves behind a deep legacy in the Canadian music industry, having influenced the careers of hundreds of artists and countless music professionals.

Jeffrey Remedios will begin his position as Universal Music Canada’s President and CEO effective September 21. Jeffrey co-founded Arts & Crafts in 2003, and has created an impressive global operation with offices in Toronto, L.A, and Mexico City. He also serves as the Chairman of FACTOR, and volunteers on many boards of directors. Prior to Arts & Crafts, Jeffrey worked at Virgin Music Canada (later EMI Music Canada), working in both Media & Artist Relations and Digital Marketing, and later rising to Director of National Promotion. Jeffrey is a passionate supporter of Toronto’s local music scene.

“I have had the pleasure of working with Randy for many years: first at Universal Music, and most recently as one of our members at Music Canada. He is an experienced and passionate industry leader, whose years of experience and innovative thinking will him make a powerful addition to Bell Media’s senior leadership team. We are excited about his new path, and thrilled to begin working with his successor, Jeffrey Remedios. Jeffrey is a real powerhouse. From co-founding Arts & Crafts to creating the Field Trip festival, his dedication to artists and the music-business is without peer. It’s an exciting time for our industry,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada.

For the full release from CNW, click here.

For the full release from Bell Media, click here.

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