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Win a Vinyl or CD prize pack in our ‘Gold In Canada’ Back to School Contest!

Music Canada wants you to return to class with some fresh new vinyl in your collection from some of Canada’s favourite Gold-certified artists!

One lucky winner will receive our Grand Vinyl Bundle Prize, courtesy of Universal Music Canada, Sony Music Canada, and Warner Music Canada, which includes vinyl copies of:

  • Harry Styles Harry Styles
  • G Eazy The Beautiful & Damned
  • Arkells Morning Report
  • Lorde Melodrama
  • Khalid American Teen
  • Scott Helman Hotel D’Ville (featuring Gold single “PDA”)

Not too shabby, right?

If you’re not chosen as the Grand Prize winner, don’t fret! By entering the contest, you are also eligible to receive a CD prize pack of certified artists like Camila Cabello, Charlotte Cardin, P!nk, and more.

Each release included in the contest contains a track that has been certified #GoldinCanada by Music Canada. Every Thursday, Music Canada updates the Gold In Canada playlists on Spotify, Apple Music, and Google Play with 50 of the latest tracks earning the coveted Gold certification.

HOW TO WIN

    1. Follow Gold/Platinum Canada on Instagram and/or Twitter,
    2. Like the contest post,
    3. Tell us your favourite song certified #GoldinCanada this summer (hint: follow our playlist for the latest tracks, or visit the Gold/Platinum Canada database),
    4. Tag a friend that you listened to it with!

Don’t forget to ‘Like’ Gold/Platinum Canada on Facebook for more updates on the latest certified releases.

Click here to view the Official Contest Rules.

Contest closes at 11:59 PM EST on September 18, 2018.

 

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5 Seconds Of Summer receive Gold plaques at 2018 iHeartRadio MMVAs

Photo Credit: Universal Music Canada

5 Seconds Of Summer had a busy week in Toronto! Following their appearance at the 2018 iHeartRadio MMVAs, the Australian band played a highly anticipated sold-out show at Toronto’s RBC Echo Beach. During their visit, Universal Music Canada presented the group with a Gold plaque for their 2018 album Youngblood. The plaque also commemorates the Platinum certification for the album’s title track, and Gold certification for single “Want You Back.”

Watch 5SOS’ performance of their Platinum hit “Youngblood” at the 2018 iHeartRadio MMVAs below.

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Marshmello & Anne-Marie receive 3x Platinum plaques at 2018 iHeartRadio MMVAs

American DJ/producer Marshmello and British singer-songwriter Anne-Marie joined forces in 2018 to collaborate on their hit single “Friends.” During a visit to Toronto Sunday for the 2018 iHeartRadio MMVAs, the artists were presented with Triple Platinum plaques for “Friends” by Warner Music Canada. Following the broadcast, Anne-Marie shared the exciting news with her fans through her social media channels.

Anne-Marie will extend her stay in Canada for a performance Wednesday night in Montreal, before returning to Toronto for two shows Thursday and Friday at Rogers Centre opening for Ed Sheeran. Watch Anne-Marie and Marshmello’s performance of “Friends” below, which kicks off with a verse of the singer’s Gold-certified hit “2002.” Both singles, along with the Gold-certified hit “Alarm,” can be found on her Platinum-certified debut studio album Speak Your Mind.

 

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Loud Luxury receive 4x Platinum plaque for breakthrough hit

Photo Credit: Loud Luxury (Twitter)

Toronto-based DJ duo Loud Luxury scored one of the hottest tracks of the summer with their breakthrough single “Body” featuring Brando (centre). Originally certified Gold in March, “Body” was officially certified 4x Platinum ahead of their massive hometown performance at Toronto’s VELD Festival, where they were surprised with a plaque from Sony Music Canada.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BmJn5Hqh9lF/?hl=en&taken-by=loudluxury

Watch the music video for “Body” below.

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WorkInCulture launches MakingItWork research project and survey

WorkInCulture, an Ontario-based not-for-profit organization, has launched a new major research initiative called MakingItWork, which aims to understand the opportunities and challenges of working in Ontario’s creative sector. Working alongside consulting firm Nordicity, the MakingItWork research will examine everything from incomes and livelihoods to skills needs and barriers to sustainability.

As part of this research, WorkInCulture developed a short survey aimed at individuals and employers within Ontario’s arts, culture, heritage and library sectors. This includes:

  • Individual artists;
  • Cultural workers (whether you are self-employed or working for an organization);
  • Not-for-profit organizations serving the creative community, including arts service organizations, membership-based organizations, trade associations, etc;
  • The cultural industries, including record labels and music publishers, book and magazine publishers, film & television production companies, game studios, etc;
  • Heritage institutions, including museums, natural heritage sites, as well as their employees and professionals in the field (archaeologists, for example); and,
  • Ontario’s public library system and their employees.

The survey is available in English and French, and should take less than 20 minutes to complete. Survey participants will have the opportunity to enter into a draw to win a pair of tickets to the Creative Works Conference in Toronto on May 10, 2019.

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Dan + Shay receive Platinum plaques in Toronto

Photo Credit: Warner Music Canada

Country stars Dan + Shay have had an incredible 2018 lead by the success of their single “Tequila,” which was officially certified Canadian Platinum on June 1, 2018. Ahead of their opening slot for Rascal Flatts at Toronto’s Budweiser Stage last week, Warner Music Canada presented with duo with plaques commemorating the Platinum certification.

“Tequila” is their second Platinum certification in Canada, having received one in 2017 for their hit “From The Ground Up.” They also have two more Gold certifications in Canada for “19 You + Me” and “Nothin’ Like You.”

Watch the music video for “Tequila” below.

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Music Policy Forum Summit announces 2018 program themes

The 2018 Music Policy Forum Summit will be held in Washington, DC, at Georgetown University October 26-27. The forum will bring together several hundred musicians, researchers, policymakers, industry and nonprofit leaders, and other stakeholders for a wide-ranging exploration of some of the most promising and exciting thought leadership in the music and policy space.

The two-day summit will will shine a spotlight on some of the most compelling, inspiring and, sometimes, frustrating developments in public policy, research, technology, and culture. Programming will be centered on four primary themes that reflect the issues that are the most pressing to the industry:

  1. The Future is… Access
  2. The Future is…Data
  3. The Future is…Collaborative
  4. The Future is….Incremental

Music Canada Executive Vice President and Music Policy Forum co-founder Amy Terrill will be speaking at the conference, elaborating on the research from Music Canada’s 2018 Keys to a Music City report and moderating the panel Bridging the Gap: Effective Models of Local Governments in Partnership with Local Music Communities.

Terrill will be joined at the summit by fellow co-founders Michael Bracy,  Ashlye Keaton, Anna Celenza and Gene Meneray in curating the agenda and presenters at the event. Other presenters include musicians Dessa and Erin McKeown, researchers Kwende Kefentse, Nancy Baym and Michael Seman, organizer Kevin Erickson, tech entrepreneur Jacoby Dubose, Music Canada Live Executive Director Erin Benjamin and New Orleans Jazz Museum Director Greg Lambousy.

Tickets are available now. Additional speakers and a final program schedule will be released in the coming weeks.

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VIDEO: 2018 Global Forum panel discussion with Lido Pimienta, Vanessa Reed, Greyson Gritt & TONA, moderated by Samantha Slattery

Titled Inclusivity & Accountability: Bringing Measurable Change for the Music Industry, the 2018 Global Forum at Canadian Music Week brought together, artists, academics and advocates working to make the music industry more reflective of, and accountable to, the wider community.

The event began with a keynote by Dr. Stacy L. Smith, Founder and Director of the the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, the leading think tank in the world studying issues of diversity and inequality in entertainment through research, advocacy and sponsored projects. Following extensive work in the film and television industries, including pioneering the popular “inclusion rider,” the group is now bringing their renowned work to the music industry. At the Global Forum, Dr. Smith discussed the striking findings of their preliminary music industry study Inclusion in the Recording Studio? Based on the extensive data they have gathered, the group plans to roll out practical solutions “so that the needle will move quickly, so that everyone who has the talent has the ability to participate not only equitably, but in safe work environments, so that they might thrive.”

Following Dr. Smith’s keynote, a diverse panel of artists and advocates discussed initiatives currently underway, and other possible solutions, to improve inclusion across various parts of the music industry. The panel featured Lido Pimienta, Polaris Prize-winning musician, curator and visual artist; JUNO-winning rapper, producer and youth advocate TONA; chief executive of PRS Foundation and the Keychange initiativeVanessa Reed, and; JUNO-winning Quantum Tangle member, producer and solo-artist Greyson Gritt. The discussion was moderated by Samantha Slattery, Chairperson and Founder of Women in Music Canada.

Watch the full panel discussion below.

Quoted

Sometimes, even with the artist community, it feels like there’s a constant tug of war between power and then opportunity. What ends up happening is that the people who are trying to capitalize and obtain the power – I’m going to refer to it as a meritocracy – because the people who are actually in control of things in this industry, especially in Canada, are the ones that are making the decisions. In our communities that we come from, there’s already a lack of opportunity. There’s already an imbalance of education as well, and even job opportunities. When people come in it feels like they’re kind of parachuting in to our communities and not integrating with us the way they need to. And it feels like a photo opportunity. You know, what are you really trying to accomplish as far as integrating artists? Is it more about filling a quota in the stats sheet? Or is it really about pushing the needle with your job description and what you’re doing? – TONA

 

Your point about respect is something that audiences have obviously been talking about a lot now. At least in the UK, we’ve been hearing a lot more from audiences than artists about some of the struggles they have. So, obviously sexual assault of women at festivals, and accessibility for anyone who’s got any kind of disability. There’s some interesting not-for-profit grassroots movements which have really been helping with that. There’s an organization called Attitude is Everything, which has got lots of venues and festivals to sign up to different kinds of charters ensuring that people of all backgrounds can access these brilliant festivals and stages. And then there’s an initiative called Girls Against, which has been working with festivals to start tackling the issue around sexual assaults. But I mean there’s still a long way to go, but it’s interesting that those first steps often come from the grassroots, not-for-profit, voluntary sector, and then it starts to be normalized, and eventually it will become something that hopefully will be part of everyone’s practice. But I think audiences and artists talking about the challenges together could be interesting.  – Vanessa Reed

 

Instead of men having their own conversations and starting their own initiatives and being like ‘yeah we need this too and we’re going to work with women’ it’s often this polarized response, ‘well you want that, but what about us? You shouldn’t have that unless we have it.’ And it ends up being this thing of ‘choose your side’ instead of everyone working together and recognizing you need this and I need this. And so I think about two-spirit people and transgender people, and we need that too, but I don’t want it to be in response to ‘what about me’ and to take resources away from that. I definitely believe women need more representation, always, and I would love to see more things of like 100%. It’s been 100% men for how long? Just to be equitable, you’d almost think it’d need to be 500 years of Indigenous and racialized folks, and women for about another 500 years first, and then we can talk about having half and half, right? – Greyson Gritt

 

Another approach that was just brought to my attention recently as well, and I believe it’s Harris Institute, has consciously hired back female students as professors, and originally it was about four or five years ago he said, there was about 5% female students – so we’re not even getting them into the pipe, it’s not that we’re losing them – and since adjusting his professor dynamic, it has gone up to 20% female students now in a very short period of time, so to your point, I think when people see people that they can relate to doing things that would maybe traditionally be white men doing them, I think it’s really important to be able to showcase everybody being able to do all those things. Just seeing it seems to make a huge impact on people actually following through. – Samantha Slattery

 

The best music right now is being produced by women. It just happens to be the case. The stuff that excites me, I listen to it once and I look at the credits and I look at who’s behind it and it just happens to be a woman. So I wouldn’t even call it that I get out of my way. It just happens. Brilliant women who are in music and in the music industry and in sound and sound engineering are there, and available and ready. And if I’m going to pay anyone, that’s the people that I’m going to pay because it’s just natural to me. It’s not even a question to me. – Lido Pimienta

 

A selection of tweets from event guests is below and photos from the 2018 Global Forum can be viewed on Music Canada’s facebook page.

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Rescuing, Restoring, and Reuniting Instruments in Gravenhurst, Ontario

On Sunday, August 5th, Music Canada introduced the Three Rs Music Program at the second annual Sawdust City Music Festival in Gravenhurst, Ontario. The new program, which is rescuing gently used instruments, restoring them to fully-functional condition, and then reuniting them with students in publicly funded schools across Ontario, will be fully operational this Fall.

Instruments were collected from artists and concert-goers at Music Canada’s booth in the festival’s Vendor Village at Gull Lake Rotary Park. Among the collected instruments were acoustic and electric guitars, as well as ukulele, fiddle, flute, and snare drum.

The instruments will be restored by Currie’s Music, a local vintage music and repair shop. Once the instruments are fully-functional, they will be made available to publicly funded schools in the Gravenhurst area.

Music Canada would like to thank all the festival attendees who generously donated their instruments. Additional opportunities for instrument donation will be announced soon.

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Toronto’s musical history recognized in Heritage Toronto Awards’ 2018 Historical Writing: Book nominees

Heritage Toronto has announced 18 nominees for its 2018 Historical Writing prize, recognizing English language non-fiction books or e-books. The Heritage Toronto Awards “showcase extraordinary contributions to the conservation and promotion of Toronto’s heritage, honouring individuals, groups and organizations for their efforts.”

Three of this year’s nominees for the Historical Writing: Book category pay homage to Toronto’s legendary musicians and music history:

Peter Goddard: The Great Gould

The Great Gould, with the support of the Glenn Gould Estate, draws on interviews with Glenn Gould to present a freshly revealing portrait of the musician’s unsettled life, his radical decision to stop playing concerts, his career as a radio innovator, and his deep response to the Canadian environment. “

Goddard is an accomplished Canadian music journalist and historian who won the 1973 JUNO Award for Music Journalist of the Year. He has also written books on Ronnie Hawkins, Triumph, David Bowie, and many more musicians, as well as his 1989 book Shakin’ All Over: The Rock ‘n’ Roll Years in Canada.

 

 

David McPherson: The Legendary Horseshoe Tavern

“From country and rockabilly to rock ‘n’ roll, punk, and more, the live music venue has evolved with the times and trends—always keeping pace with the music.  This book celebrates the legacy of the Horseshoe Tavern, and its importance to Toronto music culture today.”

David McPherson is an author specializing in music and golf. His most recent book, The Legendary Horseshoe Tavern explores the 70-year legacy of the storied Queen Street West venue. In an interview with NOW Magazine, McPherson said “When it comes to live music in North America, there are few places that can match the storied building at 370 Queen West. The Horseshoe is a beacon for music lovers, a pilgrimage place for those who love and understand its significance as part of Toronto’s rich musical landscape.”

 

Nicholas Jennings: Lightfoot

Lightfoot chronicles the life and career of Gordon Lightfoot, unquestionably one of Canada’s greatest songwriters. No matter how much his fame grew abroad, Lightfoot has always come home to Toronto.”

Nicholas Jennings is a renowned music journalist and historian who has written on music for Maclean’s, Billboard, the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail, among many others. His books on Canadian music include Before the Gold Rush: Flashbacks to the Dawn of the Canadian Sound (Penguin) and Fifty Years of Music: The Story of EMI Music Canada (Macmillan). He is passionate about the preservation of Toronto’s music history and in addition to his writing, he also leads walking tours on the musical history of Yorkville and the Yonge Street strip, and he was instrumental in the preservation of the historic “Sam the Record Man” sign which now hangs above Yonge Dundas Square.

 

In Music Canada’s globe-spanning research, music history was found to be an important element of building a Music City, and many Music Cities, including Liverpool, New Orleans and Nashville are steeped in music history. As Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson notes in The Mastering of a Music City, “A great Music City knows its music history – you need to know your own story.”

Congratulations to these outstanding Heritage Toronto Awards Historical Writing: Book nominees, and thank you for your work to preserve Toronto’s rich musical history. Congratulations are also due to all other nominees for the 2018 Historical Writing: Book Award – Bruce Newton, John Lorinc, Jane Farrow, Stephanie Chambers, Maureen Fitzgerald, Ed Jackson, Tim McCaskell, Rebecka Sheffield, Rahim Thawer, Tatum Taylor, Tim Morawetz, Scott Kennedy, Shawn Micallef, Robert C. Vipond, Roberto Perin, Phillip Gordon Mackintosh, Karolyn Smardz Frost, Lance Hornby, Adam Bunch, Timothy J. Stewart, Pedro Mendes, Terry Beauchamp, Trevor Cole and Gare Joyce.

The Heritage Toronto Awards ceremony takes place on Monday, October 29 at the Carlu (444 Yonge Street). Tickets can be purchased on the Heritage Toronto website.

 

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