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Music Canada Applauds Government of Canada for Moving Forward on Copyright Board Reform

Oct. 30, 2018, Toronto: Music Canada is pleased to see the Government of Canada has taken concrete action to support Canadian creators and the labels that invest in them through reforms to the Copyright Board of Canada. The changes, which were tabled yesterday in the Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 2, will make the Board’s processes faster, more efficient, and more predictable.

“Music Canada thanks the Hon. Navdeep Bains for his vision on these changes, and for his leadership throughout the Copyright Board reform process,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “A modernized Copyright Board will mean a more predictable and transparent process for all participants, which will support royalty rate-setting that better reflects the true value of music in a functioning marketplace. By ensuring a more efficient regulatory environment, these changes will help put more money in creators’ pockets and strengthen Canada’s economic competitiveness.”

Copyright Board reform has long been a priority for the music sector, as the rates set by the Board directly impact the value of music and the amount that artists and labels receive for their music and investments. Music Canada has been a leading advocate for reform, having participated in the Senate hearings on the Copyright Board, the government consultation on reforming the Board, and the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s Review of the Canadian Music Industry, each time appearing as a key stakeholder in favour of full and meaningful reforms.

By implementing these changes, the Government is following through on their commitment made in the 2018 federal budget, which proposed a new Intellectual Property Strategy that enables economic growth. A reformed Copyright Board will create a more competitive and predictable business environment that supports investment in the creative industries, fostering innovation in the cultural sector.

Music Canada looks forward to seeing the final details on the implementation of these changes and working with the government to implement this innovative agenda for the Copyright Board of Canada.

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For more information:
Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359


About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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ADISQ Gala celebrates 40 years in Montreal

Music Canada would like to congratulate all of the nominees at the 40th ADISQ Gala, which took place Sunday night at Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier in Montreal’s Place des Arts. 11 Félix trophies were handed out at the Gala, which was hosted by comedian Louis-José Houde, while 20 more were awarded on Wednesday, October 24 at the ADISQ Industry Gala.

The evening featured performances by 2Frères, Andréanne A. Malette, Isabelle Boulay, Ludovick Bourgeois, Roxane Bruneau, Galaxie, Lydia Képinski, Pierre Lapointe, Hubert Lenoir, Loud and Tire le coyote. To celebrate the 40th edition of the Gala, Mario Pelchat, Martine St. Clair, Guylaine Tanguay and Maxime Landry performed a medley of the top songs from the previous 39 years. As well, multi-Platinum rock band Harmonium were honoured with a star-studded musical tribute by by Marie-Pierre Arthur, Philippe Brach, Catherine Major, Patrice Michaud, Ariane Moffatt and Yann Perreau, accompanied by the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

Hubert Lenoir, the 24-year-old breakthrough artist from Quebec City, took home a leading three awards from Sunday’s Gala. Lenoir was also nominated for the country’s top album at the 2018 Polaris Music Prize for his Félix-winning debut album Darlène.

Congratulations to ADISQ on 40 dynamic years of supporting, promoting, and celebrating Quebec’s music industry. The full list of winners from Sunday’s Gala can be viewed below.

Album of the Year – Adult Contemporary 
La science du coeur – Pierre Lapointe

Album of the Year – Hip-Hop 
Une année record – Loud

Album of the Year – Pop 
Darlène – Hubert Lenoir

New Artist of the Year
Hubert Lenoir

Concert of the Year – Singer-songwriter 
Le silence des troupeaux – Philippe Brach

Concert of the Year – Performer 
Demain matin, Montréal m’attend – Artistes variés

Composer of the Year
Philippe Brach/Philippe Brach, La Controverse pour Le silence des troupeaux, Philippe Brach

Group or duo of the Year
2Frères

Female Artist of the Year
Klô Pelgag

Male Artist of the Year
Patrice Michaud

Song of the Year 
Fille de personne II – Hubert Lenoir

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Playback 2018: Loreena McKennitt receives the Music Canada Artist Advocate Award

At Playback 2018, Music Canada’s annual industry dialogue and celebration, renowned Canadian musician and record label owner Loreena McKennitt was honoured with the Artist Advocate Award in recognition of her long-time advocacy for musicians’ rights.

The Artist Advocate Award was introduced at Playback 2017. Now in its second year, the award recognizes musicians and songwriters for their outstanding advocacy efforts to improve the livelihoods of music creators.

Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson presented McKennitt with the award, remarking:

“Loreena, as everyone in this room knows, is an internationally successful artist entrepreneur.  She founded her record label Quinlan Road in 1985, and since then, her music has received critical acclaim worldwide with sales of 14 million records globally.

Throughout her illustrious career, and from the day she chose to retain her master rights, and do it her own way, she has been a passionate, devoted advocate for musicians’ rights.

Her testimonies and submissions to parliamentary hearings have, over the years, demonstrated her deep business and political acumen, and has influenced real change making her a force to be reckoned with.

She is also a dedicated human rights advocate, a generous philanthropist, she established the Cook-Rees Memorial Fund in 1998.

I had the privilege of working for Loreena for almost 10 years and we have remained friends ever since. So in recognition of her unwavering public support for the rights of music creators, we are proud to present Loreena McKennitt with our 2018 Music Canada Artist Advocate Award.”

 

McKennitt graciously accepted the award, remarking on her career path and the impact that music has had on people across the globe. In her acceptance speech, she stated:

“Well, thank you very much Graham for this, as well as Music Canada. It is unexpected but also, I feel there are others who are equally, if not more, deserving.

It is true that my career path began in earnest around 1990 and it was at that time that I found Graham and he helped mastermind what became to some, a famous Warner deal. And he was an educator for me and an advocate as well as someone who really showed me a lot of the path forward.

I grew up in Southern Manitoba in a German Mennonite community and music was central to our lives. Not so much in a professional sense, but in terms of a living, breathing medium that means so much to us as a species. The fact that I set out to be a veterinarian and ended up in the music industry certainly speaks to the fact that you can set out on a journey and not know where you will end up.

But it is my sincere hope that through gatherings, such as today, and the minds of people who are really leaning against the wheel, that we can change for the better. All those who enjoy music are enriched by it, healed by it, entertained by it. And to protect that realm of music in their lives, we have as an industry, it’s not all about us, it’s all about other people and people we sometimes call the consumer. But when I meet them I hear people who have been genuinely changed through the medium of music.

So, I thank you all once again for being here this afternoon and thank you very much for this recognition. I will continue to be whatever support I can until I hang up my shoes. Thank you.”

Video of the award presentation and McKennitt’s acceptance speech is embedded below.

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Playback 2018: Josh Colle recognized with Music Canada President’s Award

On Tuesday, October 16th, Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson presented Josh Colle, lifelong music fan and outgoing Toronto City Councillor, with the Music Canada President’s Award. The announcement was made at Playback 2018, Music Canada’s annual industry dialogue and celebration, which took place at The Great Hall.

The Music Canada President’s Award is presented to an individual outside of the music community who exhibits a deep passion for music and the people who make it, and who has had a considerable impact on the music industry.

Colle has exemplified those qualities in his role as City Councillor for Ward 15. Since being elected in 2010, Colle has been known as “the music guy” on Council – first unofficially, as a frequent concertgoer, and then officially, in his role as Co-Chair of the Toronto Music Advisory Council (TMAC).

Colle “has been the most stalwart champion of our industry at City Hall,” said Henderson, noting that Colle formed the first task force for music at City Hall, which later evolved into TMAC.

“In his ward, Josh has tirelessly advocated for increased arts and music programming, connected youth with music grant opportunities and industry mentors, and spearheaded efforts to celebrate Toronto’s reggae music history with the creation of Reggae Lane,” continued Henderson. “It is my absolute honour to present the 2018 Music Canada President’s Award to Josh Colle.”

“As a lifelong fan and supporter or Toronto’s amazing music scene I am honoured to be recognized by Music Canada,” said Colle. “We have made so much progress, have so much to be proud of, and I look forward to continuing to support music in Toronto.”

Through his passion for music, Colle has helped change the way that City Hall views Toronto’s music scene. Where it was once an afterthought in terms of planning and policies, today departments like Municipal Licensing, City Planning, Public Library, Emergency Services, Toronto Parks and more have consulted the industry and consider its needs as they conduct their work.

Colle was an early champion of the City of Toronto Music Office, the Toronto Music Strategy, the Toronto/Austin Music City Alliance, and provided crucial leadership on the protection of live music venues. Recognizing that rapid gentrification and development in Toronto could threaten the city’s live music venues, Colle presented a motion to help protect Toronto’s existing venues, and foster an environment to help new venues become established.

One of Colle’s proudest achievements as Councillor was the establishment of Reggae Lane, which recognizes the rich music heritage of Eglinton Avenue West. After helping rename the roadway near Eglinton Avenue and Oakwoods Avenue, Colle commissioned the largest reggae-themed mural anywhere in Canada to pay tribute to the musical icons that made the area the second-largest hub for reggae music after Kingston, Jamaica. The 1,200 square foot mural, painted by local artist Adrian Hayles, depicts artists Pluggy Satchmo, Bernie Pitters, Leroy Sibbles, Lord Tanamo, Jay Douglas, and more.

Watch the video below as Councillor Colle accepts the award, presented by Music Canada’s President and CEO, Graham Henderson.

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Schools across Ontario invited to apply for support for musical instrument programs

 

October 24, 2018, Toronto: Publicly funded schools across Ontario are now invited to submit expressions of interest to The Three Rs Music Program for musical instrument repair grants of up to $2,500, and requests for refurbished instruments. The Three Rs Music Program Portal provides a one-stop location to facilitate requests and applications.

Administered by Music Canada’s new national affiliated non-profit, Music Canada Cares, The Three Rs Music Program aims to provide equitable access to quality music education by increasing the inventory of musical instruments in Ontario’s publicly funded schools, increasing public engagement in support of music education, and connecting students’ learning experience to various aspects of Canada’s dynamic music industry.

Qualified applicants to The Three Rs Music Program must:

● Be part of the English or French public or Catholic school systems in Ontario
● Currently employ a music teacher
● Have a demonstrated need for instrument repair
● Have the school Principal’s approval to submit an application

Through the portal, schools can identify what type of refurbished instruments are most needed for their program and enter up to 20 instruments in their possession requiring repair. They can also enter local repair shop information where the repairs are to be done in their community.

“We’re pleased to announce that our portal is accessible, bilingual and user-friendly,” says Sarah Hashem, Managing Director of The Three Rs Music Program. “We want to make a big impact for music education in the province in a short period of time, so we’re encouraging schools and educators across the province to seize this opportunity and apply early.”

Requests through the portal can be submitted until November 18, 2018. In addition to repair grants, The Three Rs Music Program conducts community instrument drives to collect gently-used instruments from Ontario communities. After a successful inaugural drive in Lindsay, the program is now accepting donations in the Greater Toronto Area.

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For more information:
Corey Poole, Music Canada Cares
cpoole@musiccanadacares.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Follow Music Canada Cares on Facebook and Twitter.

About Music Canada Cares
Music Canada Cares is non-profit organization focused on highlighting the extraordinary benefits of music to society. We are dedicated to advancing the quality and effectiveness of music education in the public-school system, engaging the public in support of music education, and celebrating the value of music and those who create it. Music Canada Cares is an affiliate of Music Canada.

About The 3 Rs Music Program
The Three Rs Music Program—rescuing instruments, restoring them to a fully functional condition and reuniting them with students—is advancing the effectiveness of publicly funded music education programs across Ontario through musical instrument refurbishment, community appeals, and artist connections. Using a community-driven approach, we will be ensuring more students have access to the developmental, cognitive, and social benefits of music.

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster. For more on Music Canada, please visit www.musiccanada.com

 

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Les écoles publiques ontariennes invitées à s’inscrire à des programmes d’aide centrés sur les instruments de musique

 

Toronto, 24 octobre 2018 : Les écoles financées par des fonds publics de l’Ontario sont invitées à présenter au Programme musical des trois R une déclaration d’intérêt concernant la possibilité de lui soumettre soit une demande de bourse de réparation d’instruments de musique d’une valeur de jusqu’à 2 500 $, soit une demande de don d’instruments remis à neuf. Le portail du Programme musical des trois R est le guichet unique où les écoles peuvent faire leurs demandes et s’inscrire.

Administré par Musique Canada vous aime, un nouvel organisme sans but lucratif national affilié à Music Canada, le Programme musical des trois R vise à fournir un accès équitable à l’éducation musicale en Ontario en enrichissant l’inventaire d’instruments de musique des écoles financées par des fonds publics de la province, en amenant le public à s’impliquer davantage dans le soutien de l’éducation musicale et en établissant un trait d’union entre l’expérience d’apprentissage des élèves et différents aspects de l’industrie musicale dynamique du Canada.

Pour être admissible au Programme musical des trois R, l’école doit :

  • faire partie du système scolaire francophone, anglophone, publique ou catholique de l’Ontario;
  • avoir un professeur ou une professeure de musique à son emploi actuellement;
  • avoir manifestement besoin de faire réparer des instruments de musique;
  • être autorisée par son directeur ou sa directrice à présenter une demande.

En se rendant sur le portail, l’école peut déterminer le type d’instruments remis à neuf dont elle a le plus besoin pour son programme de musique et inscrire jusqu’à 20 instruments en sa possession qui ont besoin de réparation. L’école peut également fournir les coordonnées d’un atelier de réparation local si les réparations doivent se faire sur place.

« Nous sommes heureux d’annoncer que notre site est accessible, bilingue et convivial », a déclaré Sarah Hashem, directrice générale du Programme musical des trois R. « Nous tenons à avoir un profond impact sur l’éducation musicale dans la province à brève échéance, et nous encourageons donc les écoles et les éducateurs et éducatrices de partout en Ontario à profiter de cette chance et à s’inscrire sans tarder. »

Les écoles ont jusqu’au 18 novembre 2018 pour s’inscrire sur le portail du Programme musical des trois R. En plus d’accorder des bourses de réparation d’instruments, le PM3R organise régulièrement des collectes d’instruments usagés à travers la province. La première collecte, qui a eu lieu à Lindsay, a remporté un vif succès, et l’équipe accepte actuellement des dons d’instruments dans le Grand Toronto.

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Pour de plus amples renseignements :
Corey Poole, Musique Canada vous aime
cpoole@musiccanadacares.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Suivez Musique Canada vous aime sur Facebook et Twitter.

À propos de Musique Canada vous aime
Musique Canada vous aime est un organisme sans but lucratif voué à la promotion des bienfaits exceptionnels de la musique pour la société. Nous avons à cœur d’améliorer la qualité et l’efficacité de l’éducation musicale dans le système scolaire public, d’encourager le public à soutenir l’éducation musicale et de célébrer la valeur de la musique et de ceux et celles qui la créent. Musique Canada vous aime est une filiale de Music Canada.

À propos du Programme musical des trois R
Le Programme musical des trois R – récupérer les instruments, les restaurer pour les remettre en bon état de fonctionnement et les réaffecter à des élèves – ajoute à l’efficacité des programmes d’éducation des écoles financées par des fonds publics de l’Ontario grâce à la remise en état d’instruments de musique, au lancement d’appels de fonds dans la collectivité et à la complicité des artistes. Dans une démarche centrée sur la collectivité, nous verrons à ce qu’un plus grand nombre d’élèves aient accès aux bienfaits développementaux, cognitifs et sociaux de la musique.

À propos de Music Canada
Music Canada est une association professionnelle à but non lucratif qui représente les grandes maisons de disques au Canada, notamment Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada et Warner Music Canada. Music Canada collabore également avec de nombreux chefs de file de l’industrie musicale indépendante – étiquettes et distributeurs de disques, studios d’enregistrement, lieux de spectacles, promoteurs de concerts, gérants et artistes – pour assurer la promotion et le développement du secteur de la musique. Pour en savoir plus sur Music Canada, veuillez vous rendre sur www.musiccanada.com

 

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Playback 2018: Fireside Chat with Cary Sherman, CEO and Chairman of the RIAA

On Tuesday, October 16, Music Canada hosted Playback 2018, our annual industry dialogue and celebration. The event began with an annual review from Music Canada Executive Vice President Amy Terrill, followed by a keynote address from professor and author Debora Spar, and a subsequent panel discussion on how to help music creators living in the Value Gap.

The final program of the afternoon was a ‘fireside’ chat with Cary Sherman, the Chairman and CEO of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

Moderated by brilliant artist advocate and musician Miranda Mulholland, the conversation centered on Sherman’s long career as an industry titan and passionate supporter of the rights of music creators.

The discussion began with a deep-dive into the recently passed Music Modernization Act (MMA) in the US, and an outline of Sherman’s role in the evolution of this historic legislation. The MMA contains several important new components, but some of the key achievements include:

  • The creation of a cohesive ‘blanket’ mechanical license: involves the establishment of a blanket license for streaming services to companies, managed by a new collecting society that will receive these payments and distribute them to the creators.
  • Pre-1972 Recordings: royalty protections are now ensured for pre-1972 performances.
  • New ability for producers (and other ‘adjunct’ creators like sound engineers and mixers) to be paid directly from their share of the artist’s royalties.

In addition to outlining the key policy components of the MMA, Sherman also touched on how rewarding it was to see the strong support and recognition of the value of this legislation that existed on both sides of the aisle. As he described, the consensus that formed between different aspects of the industry became a powerful force that ultimately helped present a united coalition.

To watch more of the conversation, check out the video below.

Following the conversation, Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson presented Sherman with a framed Leonard Cohen poster, commemorating Cohen’s 2017 Polaris Prize Short List nomination. Sherman is a Leonard Cohen fan and shared a recollection of a special performance of his song ‘Hallelujah’ by k.d. lang at Cohen’s Songwriters Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

 

A full Playback 2018 photo gallery can be viewed on Music Canada’s Facebook page.

 

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Playback 2018 panel: What can be done to help music creators who are living in the Value Gap?

On Tuesday, October 16, Music Canada hosted Playback 2018, our annual industry dialogue and celebration. Following an annual review from Music Canada Executive Vice President Amy Terrill, and a keynote from professor and author Debora Spar, Playback 2018 featured a panel discussion focused on what can be done to help music creators who are living in the Value Gap. The panel was moderated by Nam Kiwanuka, host and producer for TVO’s The Agenda and former Much Music VJ.

Joining Nam on the panel was:

  • Dr. George Barker – Visiting Fellow London School of Economics, and Honorary Associate Professor Australian National University, who has produced three studies on the Value Gap in Canada
  • Loreena McKennitt – Renowned Canadian musician, record label owner and long-time advocate for musicians’ rights
  • Maia Davies – Toronto/Montreal based songwriter, producer and performing artist, former founding member of Ladies of the Canyon, currently releasing solo recordings as MAÏA
  • Ian MacKay – President, Re:Sound Licensing Company, dedicated to obtaining fair compensation for artists and record companies for their performance rights

Dr. George Barker began the discussion outlining several key figures leading to the loss of revenues for the recording industry, while Ian MacKay spoke to the $1.25M commercial radio royalty exemption and the impact it has on Re:Sound’s performer and record label members. Loreena McKennitt and Maia Davies then provided insight into the struggles artists and label owners are facing as a result of the Value Gap, where, as Davies points out, even songwriting peers with writing credits for Drake’s albums can’t afford their rent.

Reflecting on how remuneration models for artists and labels have changed since she began her career before the advent of the internet, McKennitt said “I would say I’m luckier than most. Because I established it (her label) when I did, and reached success when I did and now I’m a kind of legacy artist and was able to sustain my career in the twilight of my career.” McKennitt continued, “But it’s very clear – I could never reach the height of my success were I to start up now.”

You can watch the full panel discussion below.

Select photos from the panel are posted below and a full Playback 2018 photo gallery can be viewed on Music Canada’s Facebook page.

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Playback 2018: Executive Vice President Amy Terrill recaps Music Canada’s accomplishments from the last 12 months

On October 16, 2018, at The Great Hall in Toronto, Music Canada hosted Playback 2018, our annual industry dialogue and celebration.

Close to 100 members of the Canadian music industry were in attendance, including representatives from record labels, awards programs, royalty collectives and funding institutions, as well as artists, journalists, politicians and other government representatives.

Universal Music Canada President Jeffrey Remedios opened the event with a reflection on the state of the industry before Music Canada Executive Vice President Amy Terrill recapped Music Canada’s major accomplishments and new initiatives from the last 12 months.

Those accomplishments include our work to close the Value Gap in Canada, the launch of Music Canada Cares and its first program, The Three Rs Music Program, exciting partnerships with other industry groups, and our latest research report, Keys to a Music City: Examining the Merits of Music Offices, Boards, and Night Mayors.

You can watch Terrill’s full presentation below.

Near the end of the presentation, Terrill gave the audience a sneak peek of a just-released video taking you behind the scenes of the production process of our Gold and Platinum award plaques.

Following the annual review, Terrill invited Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson to the stage for a special announcement. Henderson shared preliminary results of Music Canada’s year-long, comprehensive governance review that Terrill had announced a year earlier at Playback 2017. To learn more about the changes resulting from the review, read our release.

Stay tuned for more video content from Playback 2018 in the coming days, including a keynote presentation from professor and author Debora Spar, and a ‘fireside chat’ between Recording Industry Association of America Chairman and CEO Cary Sherman and musician, label owner and festival founder, Miranda Mulholland.

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Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage releases new report examining cultural hubs and cultural districts

Earlier this month, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage released a report entitled A Vision For Cultural Hubs And Districts In Canada. This report was the outcome of a Committee study on cultural districts and hubs in Canada, with a particular focus on determining the role they play in city building, their economic impacts, their effects on arts and culture, and how the federal government can better foster and support the development of these spaces.

The Committee held eight meetings earlier this year, with Music Canada’s Executive Vice President Amy Terrill appearing as a witness during this process.

The report provides a summary of the federal government’s current initiatives regarding cultural hubs and districts, and outlines various policy perspectives on key related topics including: the social and economic impact of cultural hubs and districts, the various collaborative approaches to developing cultural hubs and districts, barriers to securing funding, and the important role of infrastructure considerations. The report also contains 18 Committee recommendations to the Government of Canada.

One of the key issues discussed in the report is how exactly a cultural hub and cultural district can be defined. Witnesses throughout the eight Committee meetings provided a number of different interpretations of what constitutes a hub or district, offering definitions that ranged from fairly encompassing to more rigidly defined. Music Canada has submitted our own recommendation regarding how cultural hubs and cultural districts should be categorized, in addition to recommending that the Department of Canadian Heritage’s definition for cultural hubs be expanded. It was encouraging to see that the official Committee recommendation reflected this assertion, with the specific language calling on the Department to “broaden the definition of a cultural hub to, among others, consider new technological art forms.”

Another important topic highlighted in the report outlined the various collaborative approaches that can be taken to developing cultural hubs and cultural districts. Alongside the role of the government, partnerships have been found to be the key to the successful creation of projects relating to cultural hubs or districts. Indeed, as EVP Amy Terrill highlighted in her testimony before the Committee, collaboration between the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors is a critical component of cultivating a flourishing network of cultural spaces and sustaining a vibrant cultural sector.

Other key issues that were outlined in the report include:

  • The social impact of cultural hubs and cultural districts, such as their role in empowering local communities and contribution to fostering inclusion
  • The economic impact of cultural districts and hubs, with a particular focus on their role as economic drivers and tourism generators
  • The distinct roles of federal, provincial, and municipal governments in encouraging the development of cultural hubs and districts
  • The barriers to securing operational funding for cultural spaces
  • The potential of introducing tax measures and incentives to support the development of cultural hubs and districts, and other types of social public spaces
  • The challenges posed by a lack of affordable spaces in urban centres and the impact of rising real estate prices on public spaces

Read the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s full report on the House of Commons website.

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Behind The Scenes: The Making of a Canadian Gold Record Plaque

Since the launch of our Gold/Platinum program in 1975, record labels across Canada have celebrated the success of their artists’ hit single or album with the presentation of an official Gold, Platinum, or Diamond certification plaque. These highly coveted plaques, which are also presented to the teams behind the certified release, are created by Music Canada’s exclusive manufacturers Frameworth Sports Marketing (Toronto, ON) and PIXSL Inc. (Montreal, QC).

Sandra Falcone has been designing Music Canada’s Gold/Platinum plaques at Frameworth for nearly a decade. In this new video, Sandra takes us behind the scenes of Frameworth Sports Marketing’s manufacturing facility in Toronto and shows the unique process of how those Gold or Platinum vinyl record plaques are created before making it to the hands of your favourite artists.

Watch and share the video on Gold/Platinum Canada’s Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts, or view on YouTube below.

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