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The JUNO Awards returning to Toronto in 2021 for its 50th Anniversary

The The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS) has announced that the 2021 JUNO Awards will be held in Toronto. This commemorates the 50th anniversary of the event, and will take place on March 28th at the Scotiabank Arena.

It has been a decade since Toronto last hosted the JUNOS – which first began in 1970, and was held at the historic venue St. Lawrence Hall. The award ceremony continued to take place in the city for another exciting 20 years, and will now return to Toronto for its golden anniversary in 2021. During this time, the JUNOS hit the road, with each host city seeing an average of over $10 million in economic impact.

“50 years ago Walt Grealis and Stan Klees created the JUNO Awards right here in Toronto and it’s an honour to bring Canada’s biggest night in music back home to where it all started,” said Allan Reid, President & CEO of CARAS / The JUNO Awards and MusiCounts, in a release. “This country continues to produce some of the most vibrant artists in the world and we invite you to join us in what will be the greatest national celebration of Canadian music ever.

The return of the JUNOS is supported by the Province of Ontario and the City of Toronto. Both the Ontario Minister of Tourism, Culture Lisa MacLeod and Toronto Mayor John Tory released statements highlighting the city’s excitement over this announcement. In a video posted on his Twitter account, Mayor Tory added how Toronto’s music industry “has thrived as we foster a succesful environment for new and emerging artists, many of whom I hope to see at the JUNOS in a few short years.” 

JUNO Week 2021 will kick off on March 22 with the finale event, The JUNO Awards Broadcast, streaming on CBC Music from the Scotiabank Arena. The 2020 JUNOS are also just around the corner, airing live from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on Sunday, March 15, 2020.

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IFPI releases ‘Music Listening 2019’ report, providing a comprehensive look at rising music engagement in Canada and around the globe

Today, IFPI, the organization representing recorded music worldwide, released Music Listening 2019, a comprehensive overview of music consumption trends from around the world. The report examines the ways in which music consumers aged 16 – 64 engage with recorded music across 21 countries. 

The report illustrates the growth of music listening around the world. Globally, music listening is up, with respondents typically spending 18 hours per week listening to music, up from 17.8 hours in 2018. This equates to approximately 2.6 hours per day, the equivalent of listening to 52 three-minute songs per day. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

This global surge in music listening is driven by fans’ love of music – more than 54% of respondents say they “love” or are “fanatical” about music. Canadians are among the world leaders in terms of passion for music – 59% of Canadians say they are music lovers or music fanatics, which is above the global average and the fourth-highest in the world. 

“This year’s report tells an exciting story of how fans are increasingly engaging with music,” said Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI. “At a time when multiple forms of media vie for fans’ attention, they are not only choosing to spend more of their time listening to – and engaging with – music but they are doing so in increasingly diverse ways.” 

The report presents a profile of music lovers, who listen to more music per week, and to listen on a greater variety of services and platforms. 

Consumers’ embrace of music streaming services is growing across all demographics, with the highest rate of growth for the use of streaming services coming from the 35 – 64 age group. 54% of that demographic reported using a music streaming service in the past month, an increase of 8% from 2018. 

Overall, 89% of respondents listen to music using an on-demand streaming service. The biggest reasons consumers enjoy these services include access to large catalogues of music, and the convenience of listening. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

The report also shows that copyright infringement remains a threat to the music ecosystem. 27% of respondents used copyright infringement as a way to listen to or obtain music in the past month. The most prevalent form of music piracy is illegal stream ripping services, which were used to access music by 23% of respondents. 

“The report also highlights that the availability of music through unlicensed methods, or copyright infringement, remains a real threat to the music ecosystem,” continued Moore. “Practices such as stream ripping are still prevalent and return nothing to those who create and invest in music. We continue to coordinate world-wide action to address this.”

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The report also illustrates the scale of music listening via video services. Globally, 47% of on-demand streaming consumption is via video streaming, ahead of paid audio streaming (37%) and free audio streaming (15%). 77% of respondents said they used YouTube for music in the past month. 

This trend is concerning, as user-upload services like YouTube pay significantly lower royalty rates compared with other music streaming services.  This has a significant impact on artists’ and other rights holders’ incomes: plays on Spotify or Apple Music put dramatically more money in their pockets than the same number of plays on YouTube. The average annual revenue to rights holders per user is estimated by IFPI at under US$1 on YouTube, while on Spotify the comparative figure is US$20. 

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The biggest cause of this discrepancy in royalty rates are provisions in Canada’s Copyright Act known as “safe harbours” that ad-supported user-upload services like YouTube claim as shelter from liability of responsibility for illegal activity. As examined in our recent report, Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, the prevalence of services such as YouTube depresses not only consumer demand for paid subscription services (that better compensate artists and other rights holders by orders of magnitude) but also royalties paid by those services. These effects are the result of substitution possibilities, such as when a service like YouTube, which profits enormously through the subsidy enabled by overly broad safe harbours, provides a free alternative to paid services.

This is why Music Canada supports the recommendations of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s ground-breaking Shifting Paradigms report, which recommends to the government a series of actions that would help artists and the creative industries. The report tackles numerous weaknesses in Canada’s Copyright Act, identifying elements which have failed to keep pace with technology and the digital marketplace for music. Among its key recommendations which will bolster a functioning marketplace for creative works, the report recommends addressing Canada’s broad safe harbour laws, eliminating or narrowing exemptions from the Act that prevent creators from being fairly compensated, combating modern forms of piracy (like stream ripping) and strengthening the enforcement of Canada’s copyright laws.

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Lizzo surprised with Multi-Platinum plaques in Toronto

Photo Credit: Warner Music Canada

On Thursday night, Lizzo returned to Toronto for a sold out show at Budweiser Stage. This was the second Toronto concert of 2019 for the American ‘Bop Star,’ who played the 1,500 capacity Danforth Music Hall in May following the release of her major label debut album, Cuz I Love You. Originally scheduled to perform at night club Rebel, Thursday’s show was later moved due to overwhelming demand to the 15,000 capacity Budweiser Stage, ten times the size of crowd she played to just months earlier.

Ahead of the massive show, Lizzo was surprised by Warner Music Canada with a Gold award plaque for Cuz I Love You, along with a Triple Platinum award plaque for one of the summer’s biggest hits “Truth Hurts.” Cuz I Love You also features the Gold-certified hit “Juice,” which Lizzo closed out Thursday’s show with.

Watch the brand new lyric video for “Truth Hurts” below.

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Haviah Mighty wins 2019 Polaris Music Prize

Community Development Program participants applaud her performance and album

On September 16, Haviah Mighty won the 2019 Polaris Music Prize for her album, 13th Floor. The Prize recognizes the best Canadian album of the year based on artistic merit without regard to genre, sales history or label affiliation, as determined by the Polaris Grand Jury. 

“For me the 13th Floor is something that we remove from our reality because it is something that we don’t understand and therefore we dismiss it,” said Mighty in a Polaris release. “This is very parallel to so many of the experiences that I speak on, on this album. I’m in a room with so many different people from so many different walks of life who have acknowledged that this is something they feel is important. These people don’t necessarily share the narratives that I do or the walks of life that I have, and yet, here we are, finally on what I believe is the 13th Floor. This is the moment of resurgence where the dismissal that has existed is now being removed, and the discussion is being had. I’m so grateful that the people around me push me to be brave enough to speak my truth and to have it be acknowledged in this way.”

The Prize was awarded at the Polaris Prize Gala, held at the historic Carlu in Toronto, which featured performances by nine of the 10 Polaris Short List nominees. The Gala featured performances by Marie Davidson, Elisapie, FET.NAT, Dominique Fils-Aimé, Les Louanges, Haviah Mighty, PUP, Shad and Snotty Nose Rez Kids. Short-lister Jessie Reyez was also in attendance. 

Among the audience attendees were 40 engaged music creators, entrepreneurs and change makers, who took part in the Polaris Community Development Program (CDP), presented by Music Canada. Launched in 2018, the program partners with Canadian not-for-profit music organizations each year to improve equity and representation in the Canadian music industry to support and develop the music community. 

Participating organizations in the 2019 Community Development Program included: 

POLARIS MUSIC PRIZE GALA 2019
Carlu, Toronto. September 16, 2019
Photo by Dustin Rabin

  • Honey Jam
  • The Indigenous Music Alliance
  • The Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance
  • Lula World
  • Manifesto
  • Native Women in the Arts
  • The Remix Project
  • SoundCheck Youth
  • U for Change
  • Urban Arts

Two of the participating organizations had alumni represented on the Polaris Prize Short List.

Jessie Reyez joined The Remix Project program in 2014, and was a graduate of Round 11.0 of the program. 

“I always feel honoured every time I talk about the Remix Project because it’s done so much for me,” said Reyez in 2018, shortly after being nominated for four JUNO Awards. “The program and that formula works — if you go in there and you do what you’re supposed to do and you don’t waste the opportunity.”

Haviah Mighty participated in the Honey Jam showcase in 2011, 2012, and 2015. 

“For those who think they can wing a performance, I learned from Elaine that there is so much more that goes into being a strong performer,” said Mighty in a recent Toronto Star article. “(Professional musicians) understand exactly what they want to look like onstage. Nothing is a whim. My live performance is what garnered the interest of my team, my booking agent, my management.”

Prior to the Gala, participants took part in a brief information session, creating an opportunity for participants to connect with Music Canada and Polaris staff, media, and other community members in a welcoming environment. 

A selection of social media reaction from participants is included below:

Honoured to be included with all of the Polaris Community Partners including Lula World, The Remix Project, SoundCheck…

Posted by Honey Jam Canada on Wednesday, September 18, 2019

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2jl0h4heYC/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2he9vNnG0h/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2hTo1HHxZ2/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

 

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Music Canada welcomes Erica Meekes as Director of PR and Events

New appointment positions Music Canada to amplify its groundbreaking music sector research and advocacy among media, industry stakeholders, and other key audiences domestically and internationally

Toronto, September 16, 2019: Music Canada, who represents the world’s leading music companies, is pleased to welcome Erica Meekes as Director, Public Relations and Events. 

Music Canada’s members – Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada, and Warner Music Canada – are at the heart of Canada’s music scene, combining creativity, entrepreneurship and cutting edge digital innovation to support Canadian artists and bring great music to fans across the country and the world. Music Canada helps our members to create conditions for a strong and dynamic music economy in Canada. Collaborating with Canadian artists and our allies across the music industry, we advocate on their behalf with policy makers and elected officials at all levels of government; offering positive, innovative and achievable solutions grounded in our research.

“Music Canada consistently raises the bar with our robust policy solutions backed by world-class research,” said Graham Henderson, President & CEO of Music Canada. “With her extensive experience in public relations and event management, Erica will amplify our advocacy both here and around the world.” 

In this newly created role, Meekes will report to Patrick Rogers, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, and will work in collaboration with Quentin Burgess, Director of Communications, who will continue his strong work in the development of communications strategies and research. 

“I am excited to join the skilled and passionate team at Music Canada and to bring our message to key audiences,” says Erica Meekes. “Music Canada’s members are driven by a passion for music and their dedication to the artists who create it. I look forward to using my passion for storytelling to share Music Canada’s research and advocacy initiatives in ways that resonate with fans, industry stakeholders, and policymakers.” 

 

For more information:
Quentin Burgess, Music Canada
qburgess@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 981-8410

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada Inc., Universal Music Canada Inc., and Warner Music Canada Co. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Polaris Music Prize and Music Canada announce the return of the Polaris Community Development Program

September 10, 2019, Toronto: Polaris Music Prize and Music Canada have announced the return of the Polaris Community Development Program. Launched in 2018, the program partners with Canadian not-for-profit music organizations each year to support and develop the music community by eliminating barriers to access for engaged music creators, entrepreneurs and change makers.

The 2019 participants are made up of not-for-profit organizations that help improve equity and representation within the music community through their programming. 

Each participating organization will receive tickets to the Polaris Music Prize Gala to distribute to individuals who directly impact or participate in the organization’s music programming, courtesy of Music Canada. The program also includes opportunities for participants to take a behind-the-scenes look at the Gala production and connect with Polaris staff, media, and other community members pre-event. 

“Through our partnership with Music Canada, the Community Development Program helps ensure that the community organizations that help develop artists can attend the Gala, and build further connections within the industry,” says Steve Jordan, Founder and Executive Director of the Polaris Music Prize. “Several Polaris nominated artists have taken part in these organizations, so making sure they are represented at the Gala is important to us.”

“Music Canada is proud to support the Polaris Community Development Program, which helps build connections between artist entrepreneurs and other change makers in the creative sphere,” says Sarah Hashem, Music Canada’s Vice President, Strategic Initiatives. “Inviting community not-for-profit organizations to attend and meet industry peers in a welcoming environment is part of our commitment to improving equitable practices within the music sector.”

Participating organizations in the 2019 Community Development Program include: 

  • Honey Jam
  • The Indigenous Music Alliance
  • The Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance
  • Lula World
  • Manifesto
  • Native Women in the Arts
  • The Remix Project
  • SoundCheck Youth
  • U for Change
  • Urban Arts

The 2019 Polaris Music Prize Gala takes place on Monday, September 16th at The Carlu in Toronto. Canadian non-profits interested in participating in the 2020 Community Development Program are encouraged to contact Claire Dagenais at claire.dagenais@polarismusicprize.ca.

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For more information:

Quentin Burgess, Music Canada
qburgess@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 981-8410

 

 

About Polaris Music Prize
Polaris Music Prize Inc. is a not-for-profit organization that annually honours and rewards artists who produce Canadian music albums of distinction. A select panel of music critics then judge and award the Prize without regard to musical genre or commercial popularity. For more on the Polaris Music Prize, please visit www.polarismusicprize.ca.

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster. For more on Music Canada, please visit www.musiccanada.com.

 

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Le Prix de musique Polaris et Music Canada annoncent le retour du Programme de développement de la communauté

10 septembre 2019, Toronto : Le Prix de musique Polaris et Music Canada annoncent le retour du Programme de développement de la communauté Polaris. Lancé en 2018, ce programme s’associe chaque année avec des organismes musicaux canadiens sans but lucratif pour appuyer et favoriser le développement de la communauté musicale en éliminant les obstacles auxquels font face les créateurs de musique engagés, les entrepreneurs et les artisans du changement.

Les participants de 2019 sont tous des organismes sans but lucratif qui contribuent à l’amélioration de l’équité et de la représentation au sein de la communauté musicale par le biais de la programmation.

Chaque organisation participante recevra des billets offerts par Music Canada pour le Gala du Prix de musique Polaris qu’elle distribuera à des personnes qui ont un impact direct ou participent activement à la programmation musicale de leur organisation. Le programme comporte également la possibilité, pour les participants, de découvrir les coulisses de la production du Gala et de rencontrer le personnel du Prix de musique Polaris ainsi que des représentants des médias et d’autres membres de la communauté avant l’événement.

« Grâce à notre partenariat avec Music Canada, le Programme de développement de la communauté aide à faire en sorte que les organisations communautaires qui participent au développement d’artistes puissent assister au Gala et établir de nouveaux liens à l’intérieur de l’industrie », souligne Steve Jordan, fondateur et directeur exécutif du Prix de musique Polaris. « Plusieurs finalistes du Prix Polaris ont participé aux travaux de ces organisations, donc il est important pour nous de nous assurer qu’ils soient représentés au Gala. »

« Music Canada est fière d’appuyer le Programme de développement de la communauté Polaris, qui aide à établir des liens entre les artistes-entrepreneurs et d’autres artisans du changement dans la sphère créative », ajoute Sarah Hashem, vice-présidente, initiatives stratégiques, à Music Canada. « Le fait d’inviter les organisations sans but lucratif de la communauté à assister au Gala et à rencontrer leurs pairs de l’industrie dans un environnement accueillant s’inscrit dans notre engagement envers l’amélioration des pratiques équitables au sein du secteur de la musique. » 

Les organisations qui participeront au Programme de développement de la communauté 2019 sont notamment :

  • Honey Jam
  • The Indigenous Music Alliance
  • The Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance
  • Lula World
  • Manifesto
  • Native Women in the Arts
  • The Remix Project
  • SoundCheck Youth
  • U for Change
  • Urban Arts

 

Le Gala du Prix de musique Polaris se déroulera le lundi 16 septembre 2019 au Carlu, à Toronto. Les organisations canadiennes sans but lucratif intéressées à participer au Programme de développement de la communauté 2020 sont invitées à communiquer avec Claire Dagenais au claire.dagenais@polarismusicprize.ca.

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Pour de plus amples renseignements :

Quentin Burgess, Music Canada
qburgess@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 981-8410

 

Au sujet du Prix de musique Polaris
Le Prix de musique Polaris est une organisation à but non lucratif qui honore et récompense annuellement les artistes ayant créé des albums de musique canadiens de renom. Un groupe sélectionné de critiques musicaux jugent et décernent le Prix sans considération pour le genre musical ou la popularité commerciale. Pour plus d’information sur le Prix de Musique Polaris, veuillez vous rendre sur www.prixdemusiquepolaris.ca.

Au sujet de Music Canada

Music Canada est une organisation sans but lucratif qui représente les grandes maisons de disques au Canada : Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada et Warner Music Canada. Music Canada collabore également à la promotion et au développement de la musique canadienne indépendante en collaboration avec certains des principaux acteurs de l’industrie de la musique au Canada : étiquettes, distributeurs, studios d’enregistrement, lieux de spectacles, promoteurs de concerts, gérants et artistes. Pour plus d’information sur Music Canada, veuillez vous rendre sur www.musiccanada.com.

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Mabel receives first Canadian plaque ahead of Toronto show

Prior to her sold out show at Toronto’s Velvet Underground last Saturday, UK pop sensation Mabel was surprised with a Double Platinum plaque for the summer hit “Don’t Call Me Up” by Universal Music Canada. Mabel shared the exciting new with her fans in through her Twitter account, and promised “more to come” following the track’s North American success.

Watch the music video for “Don’t Call Me Up” from Mabel’s debut album High Expectations below.

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The Sheepdogs receive Platinum plaques at Blue Jays’ Summer Sound Festival

On Friday, August 9, Saskatchewan-bred rockers The Sheepdogs were in Toronto to throw out the first pitch at Rogers Centre ahead of the Blue Jays game against the New York Yankees. The band also performed a free outdoor show ahead of the game as part of the Jays’ Summer Sound Festival, which also featured James Barker Band the following day.

During the game, Warner Music Canada surprised the band with their second Canadian Platinum certification plaque for their 2012 self-titled album, joining JUNO Rock Album of the Year winner Learn & Burn. The album’s lead single “Feeling Good” also received a Platinum Single Award certification in 2019.

Watch the music video for “Feeling Good” below (oh, and the Jays did win that game 8-2).

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Felix Cartal surprised with first Platinum plaque

Canadian electronic artist was surprised last week by Cadence Music Group with his first ever Platinum plaque for the hit single “Get What You Give.” It is his second award plaque presentation of 2019, following a Gold award surprise at Bud Light Dreams Festival for his Lights collaboration “Love Me.”

“Get What You Give” was nominated for the 2018 JUNO Dance Recording of the Year, and samples the 1998 New Radicals hit “You Get What You Give.” Watch the music video below.

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The political power of music headlines the 2019 Global Forum at Canadian Music Week

Across genres, continents, and generations, artists have harnessed the unique power of music to rally imaginations and propel ideas into action. This year’s Global Forum explored that theme and examined the role that music plays in political movements.  The Soundtrack to Democracy: Music’s Political and Social Power brought the Canadian Music Week attendees both historical and contemporary examples of the power of music.

The event was kicked off by Miranda Mulholland explaining her own advocacy journey that has included her becoming one the world’s strongest advocates for creator’s rights. Mulholland, a musician, label owner and festival founder, discussed the moment she realized that she needed to add speaking up to her long list of duties. “Creators of music, literature, and visual arts have always been at the forefront of every revolution in which people fought to make our lives better. Music has provided the soundtrack for human rights movements around the world…When speaking to governments and policy makers, I tell them: We, musicians, have been there for you. Now we need your help.” 

Watch Mulholland’s full remarks below:

 

Mulholland then introduced The Soundtrack to Democracy’s keynote speaker: musician, author and political activist Dave Randall. His book Sound System: the political power of music looks at examples from Beethoven to Beyoncé to the UK grime scene, and charts his journey to understand what makes music so powerful.  Randall’s book can be purchased from Pluto Press.  

Armed with a guitar and an extensive knowledge of the historical significance of music, Randall’s keynote was a musical journey through time. 

Watch Randall’s full keynote below:

Following Randall’s keynote he joined two leading musicians from Canada who have used art to drive change – Lorraine Segato of The Parachute Club and ShoShona Kish of Digging Roots – for a panel discussion. Titled Rise Up: Using creativity to make change (a reference to The Parachute Club’s anthem for equality and shared power), the panel explored effective strategies artists have used to create and inspire change on issues close to their hearts.

Watch the full panel discussion moderated by Miranda Mulholland below:

Guests were then treated to a performance by members of the fast-rising rap group The Sorority, who in between songs encouraged those in town for Canadian Music Week to get out to see live music, support local musicians, and attend at least one show that put them out of their comfort zone. The Sorority are a powerful representation of solidarity and nonconformity, and their performance was the perfect punctuation to the event’s theme. 

To conclude the event, Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson introduced the audience to a painting from 1830,  “Liberty Leading the People,” by Eugène Delacroix to illustrate the effect to which art can be political speech. Henderson noted that in its time the painting “was considered so seditious and so dangerous that for about 50 years after it had been painted it was suppressed by the political superstructure and only appeared much later.” He connected the painting to the work of Ursula K Le Guin, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and journalist Paul Foot, tracing the ways that poets, artists and more recently musicians, can change the world.

Watch Henderson’s closing remarks below:

Recognizing the power of art to convey thoughts and emotions, Music Canada commissioned illustrator and graphic artist Rodrigo Bravo to chronicle the 2019 Global Forum in a series of images. The images, available for viewing below, capture some of the points made by each speaker in both text and design, and together form a recap of one of the most successful Global Forums to date. 

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