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Tag archive: Canadian Live Music Association (4)

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Canadian Live Music Association and Music Canada announce the launch of OntarioMusicCities.ca

June 22nd, 2021, Toronto: The Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA) and Music Canada have launched the new www.OntarioMusicCities.ca site, a resource for the broader music community to stimulate economic recovery across Ontario, with funding (administered by the CLMA) to build out and enhance Music Cities work. The support was announced by Lisa MacLeod, Minister of Heritage, Sport, Tourism and Culture Industries earlier this year.

“The last 18 months have deeply impacted our live music community, and the sector has seen a devastating 92% average decrease in revenue,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the CLMA. “We thank the Minister for recognizing the integral role live music plays in our quality of life, as well as its significant economic, social, and cultural benefits. While we still face a long road ahead, this critical Music Cities work will pave a way forward and help ensure a more vibrant future – for artists, communities, tourism, and the industry as a whole.”

As part of the initiative, a survey has been launched to help guide communities as they transform toward a thriving music community, and anyone involved in the music scene at a local level is encouraged to participate. The input gathered is the next step in the development of a province-wide music cities framework that aims to help the industry return stronger than ever. 

“I am thrilled that thanks to the Minister’s support of CLMA, Music Canada’s internationally recognized Music Cities framework will support the viability of more music communities across the province,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Live music is a crucial revenue stream for Canada’s professional musicians, which creates jobs and drives local tourism. Supporting the business of live music is essential so our industry can get back to doing what they do best: creating exponential economic, social and cultural impact for artists and the communities they call home.”

The provincial Music Cities framework is grounded in Music Canada’s world-renowned ‘Music Cities’ framework, a proven model that offers support to communities across the province so they can better leverage their own local live music assets. The framework includes tools and resources that can be implemented to guide the development of local policy and bylaws, and community supports that focus on artists, venues and festivals, the wider supply chain and tourism, so that communities can grow their music economies.

The framework will deliver municipally-focused support and resources to local economies by exploring and recommending initiatives for towns and cities across the province along several categories. These include:

  • Advancing policies that support music and musicians,
  • Expanding music offices and music Advisory Boards across the province,
  • Developing initiatives that engage a broader community,
  • Furthering programs that provide access to music spaces,
  • Developing audience retention strategies for when it is safe to return to venues, festivals and music spaces,
  • Nurturing and leveraging strategic relationships with the tourism, business and other key sectors to align and advance rebuild and recovery efforts.

The CLMA and Music Canada remain committed to core values of equity, diversity and inclusion and by working with a range of organizations within the music community, they will work together to meaningfully gain ground to create a more inclusive music industry. 

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About The Canadian Live Music Association
The Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA) is the voice of Canada’s live music industry. Established in response to an identified need in the live music industry, the CLMA represents venues, clubs, concert promoters, festivals, talent agencies, arenas, performing arts centres, industry associations and networks, as well as suppliers to the sector. Its mission is to entrench the economic, social and cultural value of live music – creating the conditions for concerts to thrive, from coast to coast to coast.

About Music Canada
Music Canada represents Canada’s major record labels: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. We advocate for a healthy and vibrant Canadian music ecosystem, which includes labels, performing artists, publishers, songwriters, managers, live venues and others.

 

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The Unison Fund, the Canadian Live Music Association and Music Canada Welcome Direct Funding from the Province of Ontario

March 12th, 2021, Ottawa: The Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA), and Music Canada welcome support received from Lisa MacLeod, Minister of Heritage, Sport, Tourism and Culture Industries with today’s announcement of funding for the Unison Fund, Canada’s music industry charity and the CLMA, in support of the broader music community. 

$2M to the Unison Fund
Funding to Unison will provide much-needed emergency assistance to artists, creators, and industry from local communities across Ontario. Artists and the broader live music ecology have been deeply impacted, and this vital support to Unison comes at a time when it is desperately needed. 

“We sincerely thank Minister MacLeod and the Government of Ontario for their support and acknowledgement of the Unison Fund and the crucial and very necessary role the organization plays in providing critical assistance to vulnerable members of our music community in times of crisis. In March 2020, Unison, began the largest relief effort in our history and while we are no stranger to helping people during difficult times, truly nothing has reached the scope of the last twelve months. The investment will go a long way toward directly supporting those in the Ontario music community with the greatest need, as the urgency for assistance remains high,”  said Amanda Power, Executive Director, Unison Fund.

“As a provider of both emergency support and 24/7 free mental health counselling for the entire music industry, Unison has had and will continue to have a crucial role in making sure no one in our community falls through the cracks,” said Miranda Mulholland, artist and chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council.

$500k to the CLMA for Province-Wide Music Cities Framework Development
The CLMA has been working tirelessly since the beginning of the crisis to save cultural infrastructure and protect jobs, seeking ways for the industry at large to not only recover from the devastating blow COVID has dealt, but to ultimately return, bigger and stronger than ever.  Many continue to face a staggering 92% average revenue loss within the industry, and 64% say they are at risk of permanent closure. Today’s announcement creates the opportunity for the association to take additional action for, and on behalf of, live music’s collective future: 

“It has been a year, and it isn’t over, something our Minister recognizes. Minister MacLeod also understands that supporting the business of live music is essential so our industry can get back to doing what they do best: creating exponential economic, social and cultural impact for artists, communities and tourism. We were just beginning to harness the true power of live music when COVID struck,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the CLMA. “With this support we will be able to take all that we have learned and continue to entrench the value our members bring to cities, towns and neighbourhoods across the province through the Music Cities lens.” 

Music Canada’s ‘Music Cities’ framework will provide a proven model to help support communities across the province better leverage their own local live music assets. Designed with world-renowned research that identifies key strategies large and small cities have used to grow their music economies, plans will be implemented to guide the development of local policy and bylaws, and community support that focuses on artists, venues and festivals, the wider supply chain and tourism. 

“A strong, healthy music industry can generate diverse benefits for a community including economic growth, job creation, increased spending, greater tax revenues, and cultural health. Our Music Cities framework has helped communities achieve this success,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Recent research conducted by Music Canada shows that Canadians view live music venues as economic and cultural lifelines within their communities, and they understand that the pandemic will have severe impacts on the long-term viability of the live music sector which affects Canadian culture in the long run. This announcement of support from the provincial government is timely, and necessary support.”

Aimed at bridging the gap to bring the live music sector out of the pandemic, CLMA and Music Canada will seek to explore and recommend initiatives for towns and cities across the province along several categories. These include:

  • Advancing policies that support music and musicians, 
  • Expanding music offices and music Advisory Boards across the province, 
  • Developing initiatives that engage a broader community, 
  • Furthering programs that provide access to music spaces, 
  • Developing audience retention strategies for when it is safe to return to venues, festivals and music spaces, 
  • Nurturing and leveraging strategic relationships with the tourism, business and other key sectors to align and advance rebuild and recovery efforts.

“As our experience in London has demonstrated, music can bring enormous value to the economic and social fabric of a community. The Ontario Government’s financial commitment to live music will create opportunities for artists, reinvigorate venues, delight audiences and will allow us all to revive live,” said Cory Crossman, Music Industry Development Officer, London Music Office.

Additionally, the CLMA and Music Canada will work with a range of organizations within the music community to ensure that our shared commitments to equity, diversity and inclusion remain at the forefront.

For more information on the announcement from Lisa MacLeod, Minister of Heritage, Sport, Tourism and Culture Industries please click here.

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About Unison Benevolent Fund
Unison Fund, Canada’s music industry charity, provides counselling and emergency relief services to the Canadian music community in times of hardship or difficulties. For over a decade, Unison has been committed to helping producers, engineers, singers/songwriters, musicians, production crews, and thousands more through our financial assistance and counselling and health solutions programs. For more information, please visit: www.unisonfund.ca. If you can, PLEASE make a donation by visiting www.unisonfund.ca or text the word ‘UNISON’ to 45678 and follow the prompts to donate $10, $20, or $25.  Every donation counts.  Every donation helps.  Let’s keep Canadian music and entertainment ALIVE.

About The Canadian Live Music Association
The Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA) is the voice of Canada’s live music industry. Established in response to an identified need in the live music industry, the CLMA represents venues, clubs, concert promoters, festivals, talent agencies, arenas, performing arts centres, industry associations and networks, as well as suppliers to the sector. Its mission is to entrench the economic, social and cultural value of live music – creating the conditions for concerts to thrive, from coast to coast to coast.

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Charlotte Thompson, Red Umbrella P.R.
Unison Fund
[email protected]

Erin Benjamin
Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA)
[email protected]
(613) 769-5559

Erica Meekes, Music Canada
[email protected] / (416) 462-1485

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Public Research Findings: Canadians understand the cultural and economic impacts of the pandemic on live music – and its need for continued support

February 8, 2021, Toronto: Music Canada has partnered with Abacus Data to check back in with Canadians on their understanding of COVID-19’s ongoing impact on Canada’s live music sector — and the effects that venue closures have on those working in the music sector and its lasting impact on communities, arts and culture. The public opinion research also explored how Canadians feel about venue closures and their views on the need for continued support for those working in the sector. The findings show that Canadians are concerned that without additional support, more live music spaces will be lost before the music community can recover, resulting in a longer threat to the industry and a negative impact on Canadian culture.

“This latest research confirms that Canadians view live music venues, like festivals, concert halls and pubs, as economic and cultural lifelines within their communities,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Canadians also understand that the pandemic will have severe impacts on the long-term viability of the live music sector which affects Canadian culture in the long run.”

“The research also confirmed what we have long believed to be true: music lovers can’t wait to get back to seeing live shows, once it’s safe to do so. But Canadians also believe that artists, live music venues, crews and others working in the industry will require continued support long after other sectors of the economy can reopen. Notably, most Canadians will be “disappointed” if more venues go out of business.”

According to the report, one in five Canadians has a favourite live music venue in their community where they attend events, and half believe it is likely the venue will close due to impacts of the pandemic. Canadians believe that further live music venue closures will mean thousands of jobs lost, fewer musicians and music will be created, and new and upcoming musicians will be lost without the opportunity of playing in live music venues. These impacts are felt across Canada, and even more strongly in Quebec.

“This research substantiates everything we’ve been hearing – Canadians are deeply saddened by the loss of live music venues,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the Canadian Live Music Association. “Venues are closing their doors in increasing numbers, for circumstances beyond their control and people are recognizing the extent of the loss, and what that loss means – economically, culturally, and socially. Direct financial support today from governments is urgently needed; it can keep more venues alive, helping us to preserve as much of our vital cultural infrastructure as possible until the industry can fully recover.”

“As an artist, it is devastating to see the severe and long-term impact the pandemic is having on the music community, after nearly a year of living with restrictions due to COVID-19,” said Miranda Mulholland, artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “Artists, and emerging artists especially, depend on live performances to develop their craft, generate a following, and gain income. The opportunity to do that, at every milestone in your career, is only possible with multiple venues from the smallest locations to the larger stages and concert halls.”

In a separate report expected to be released in the coming weeks, Music Canada is checking back in with Canadian artists and creators for a renewed perspective on how their profession has evolved at this stage of the pandemic. Data for these two studies will continue to be shared with government and industry partners in 2021. The findings are helping to shape Music Canada’s advocacy message, and give decision makers a complete and up-to-date picture of the recovery phase in the music industry. 

The Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA), the people behind live music in Canada are also working to bring awareness to the damage COVID-19 shutdowns have caused Canada’s live music industry and will make further information available here.

For more information on earlier study findings please visit Music Canada’s website here

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-government-support-music-canada/.

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
[email protected]
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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New Noise Bylaw illustrates City of Toronto’s commitment to supporting a vibrant music ecosystem through clear, objective standards

New bylaw procedures have been implemented by the City of Toronto to provide clearer standards regarding noise in the city. Bylaw amendments include a number of changes relating to amplified sound’ that have positive implications for the live music ecosystem, and provide clearer communication from the City to venue owners. These substantial amendments flow from an extensive research and consultation process led by the City of Toronto’s Municipal Licensing and Standards (MLS).

Music Canada applauds the City’s amendments to the bylaw, which signify a positive step forward, and demonstrate that the music community was a meaningful stakeholder in the deliberation process. As described in our groundbreaking report The Mastering of a Music City, it is critical for cities to implement measures that support the growth of a robust music economy. 

These amendments better recognize the crucial role the live music sector plays in making Toronto a vibrant and inclusive Music City. They also demonstrate the value the City sees in the live music industry, its impact on our local economy, and what it means for the improved quality of life for those living in Toronto and the surrounding area. In addition to the elimination of the old Noise Bylaw’s ‘general prohibition’ (which stated that “no one shall produce noise that disturbs anyone else, day or night”), the updated policies contain new musician-friendly standards including:

  • Quantitative decibel limits for amplified sound, giving venues a clear, objective standard against which to measure and manage their operations
  • An adjustment to point of measurement for decimal levels, which will now be measured from the point of reception (where the noise is heard) instead of the property line of the sound source (music venue, festival site, etc.). 

Policy-makers heard from a wide range of groups, including venue owners, festival operators, artists, residents’ associations, businesses, public health authorities, and other interested stakeholders. The Toronto Music Advisory Council (TMAC) – of which Music Canada was a core member – also played an important role in the process, providing critical input and recommendations regarding the reform of various noise-related regulations. 

“These changes signal the City’s growing recognition of our businesses and organizations – who add significantly to the heart beat of Toronto,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the Canadian Live Music Association. “Live music venues and events are significant economic and cultural assets. They animate neighbourhoods, enhance benefit to local businesses, create jobs and attract tourists. We expect the new noise bylaw to be clearer in terms of interpretation and application.”

These bylaw amendments were first approved by City Council in April, but the policy changes came into effect on October 1. To learn more about the City of Toronto’s new Noise Bylaw, visit https://www.toronto.ca/city-government/public-notices-bylaws/bylaw-enforcement/noise/.

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