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Tag archive: IFPI (30)

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IFPI releases ‘Music Listening 2019’ report, providing a comprehensive look at rising music engagement in Canada and around the globe

Today, IFPI, the organization representing recorded music worldwide, released Music Listening 2019, a comprehensive overview of music consumption trends from around the world. The report examines the ways in which music consumers aged 16 – 64 engage with recorded music across 21 countries. 

The report illustrates the growth of music listening around the world. Globally, music listening is up, with respondents typically spending 18 hours per week listening to music, up from 17.8 hours in 2018. This equates to approximately 2.6 hours per day, the equivalent of listening to 52 three-minute songs per day. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

This global surge in music listening is driven by fans’ love of music – more than 54% of respondents say they “love” or are “fanatical” about music. Canadians are among the world leaders in terms of passion for music – 59% of Canadians say they are music lovers or music fanatics, which is above the global average and the fourth-highest in the world. 

“This year’s report tells an exciting story of how fans are increasingly engaging with music,” said Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI. “At a time when multiple forms of media vie for fans’ attention, they are not only choosing to spend more of their time listening to – and engaging with – music but they are doing so in increasingly diverse ways.” 

The report presents a profile of music lovers, who listen to more music per week, and to listen on a greater variety of services and platforms. 

Consumers’ embrace of music streaming services is growing across all demographics, with the highest rate of growth for the use of streaming services coming from the 35 – 64 age group. 54% of that demographic reported using a music streaming service in the past month, an increase of 8% from 2018. 

Overall, 89% of respondents listen to music using an on-demand streaming service. The biggest reasons consumers enjoy these services include access to large catalogues of music, and the convenience of listening. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

The report also shows that copyright infringement remains a threat to the music ecosystem. 27% of respondents used copyright infringement as a way to listen to or obtain music in the past month. The most prevalent form of music piracy is illegal stream ripping services, which were used to access music by 23% of respondents. 

“The report also highlights that the availability of music through unlicensed methods, or copyright infringement, remains a real threat to the music ecosystem,” continued Moore. “Practices such as stream ripping are still prevalent and return nothing to those who create and invest in music. We continue to coordinate world-wide action to address this.”

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The report also illustrates the scale of music listening via video services. Globally, 47% of on-demand streaming consumption is via video streaming, ahead of paid audio streaming (37%) and free audio streaming (15%). 77% of respondents said they used YouTube for music in the past month. 

This trend is concerning, as user-upload services like YouTube pay significantly lower royalty rates compared with other music streaming services.  This has a significant impact on artists’ and other rights holders’ incomes: plays on Spotify or Apple Music put dramatically more money in their pockets than the same number of plays on YouTube. The average annual revenue to rights holders per user is estimated by IFPI at under US$1 on YouTube, while on Spotify the comparative figure is US$20. 

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The biggest cause of this discrepancy in royalty rates are provisions in Canada’s Copyright Act known as “safe harbours” that ad-supported user-upload services like YouTube claim as shelter from liability of responsibility for illegal activity. As examined in our recent report, Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, the prevalence of services such as YouTube depresses not only consumer demand for paid subscription services (that better compensate artists and other rights holders by orders of magnitude) but also royalties paid by those services. These effects are the result of substitution possibilities, such as when a service like YouTube, which profits enormously through the subsidy enabled by overly broad safe harbours, provides a free alternative to paid services.

This is why Music Canada supports the recommendations of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s ground-breaking Shifting Paradigms report, which recommends to the government a series of actions that would help artists and the creative industries. The report tackles numerous weaknesses in Canada’s Copyright Act, identifying elements which have failed to keep pace with technology and the digital marketplace for music. Among its key recommendations which will bolster a functioning marketplace for creative works, the report recommends addressing Canada’s broad safe harbour laws, eliminating or narrowing exemptions from the Act that prevent creators from being fairly compensated, combating modern forms of piracy (like stream ripping) and strengthening the enforcement of Canada’s copyright laws.

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New IFPI website highlights the leading role record companies play in investing in and supporting artists

IFPI has launched a new website titled Powering the Music Ecosystem designed to showcase the role record labels play in today’s global music landscape as a leading investor in music, and partner and collaborator with artists.

Some of the key statistics referenced are the 33.8% of record company revenues that are invested back into music annually, and the USD $5.8 billion investment that record companies make into A&R and marketing annually.

The site emphasizes the flexibility artists have in collaborating with record companies within new partnership models, and charts one example of the various label teams that artists can work with to advance their career, such as A&R, creative, marketing & digital, sync & partnership, global distribution, and press & publicity.

The site also features several case studies on breakthrough artists like Camila Cabello, J Balvin, and Aya Nakamura, focused on how those artists collaborated with label teams to leverage their creativity and success on a global scale.

For more information, visit the full website and check out the infographic below.

 

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IFPI’s Global Music Report 2019 illustrates streaming’s continued rise in Canada and around the globe

IFPI’s anticipated annual State of the Industry” report is now available and paints a picture of an industry transformed by evolving listening trends and emerging markets. Overall, the global music industry experienced its fourth year of consecutive growth, with an increase of 9.7% in 2018. Much of that growth across the globe is attributed to streaming, which increased by 34% and accounted for almost half of global revenue at 47%.

Streaming accounted for 60% of recorded music revenues in Canada in 2018, and increased in trade value by 31.9% from USD $200.7 million in 2017 to USD $264.8 million in 2018. Of that streaming revenue, USD $211.8 million came from subscription audio streams, USD $26.78 million came from ad-supported audio streams, and USD $26.21 million came from video streams. After streaming, the next leading sources of recorded music revenues are “other digital” at 15%, physical sales at 15% and performance rights and synch at 11%.

The reports also list five key elements to fostering fair marketplaces so music continues to thrive. Those elements are:

  • Music’s value must be recognized;
  • Copyright frameworks must be clear and provide legal certainty;
  • Rights holders must be free to decide who can use their music and how;
  • Music must be licensed on fair terms, and;
  • Adequate tools must be available to prevent music from being made available illegally.

Securing sustainable growth for today’s digital music industry will be the topic of focus this Friday in Geneva, as Music Canada and IFPI present ‘An Industry Transformed’ during the convening of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

The top digital single of 2018 in Canada was “God’s Plan” by Drake, who was awarded IFPI’s 2018 Global Artist of the Year Award in February of 2019, becoming the only artist to ever win the award twice. The top digital single worldwide in 2018 was “Havana” by Camila Cabello (feat. Young Thug) with “God’s Plan” in the number two position. The top album of 2018 in Canada was Drake’s Scorpion, and globally was The Greatest Showman (OST) by Cast of ‘The Greatest Showman.’

IFPI’s Global Music Report 2019: State of the Industry is available for download on IFPI’s website.

 

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Music Canada and IFPI to present ‘An industry transformed: securing sustainable growth for today’s digital music industry’ in Geneva

On Friday, April 5 in Geneva, Switzerland, Music Canada and IFPI will co-present an event titled ‘An industry transformed: securing sustainable growth for today’s digital music industry.’ The event will take place during a gathering of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) convened by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). An industry transformed will feature the following speakers:

  • Larry S. Miller – Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Music Business Program, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development
  • Graham Henderson – President and CEO, Music Canada
  • Miranda Mulholland – Musician, President of Roaring Girl Records, and Music Festival Founder

SCCR delegates will be presented with key global and regional data from the IFPI Global Music Report (which will be published globally during the week of the SCCR), insights into the partnerships between record companies and artists, and some key challenges to ensuring the sustainable and balanced development of digital music markets around the world.

Next, Graham Henderson will share highlights from Music Canada’s upcoming report on the discrepancy between the value of music accessed by consumers and the revenues returned to the artists and businesses who create it. The report outlines how Canada’s music community has overcome initial skepticism regarding the existence of this discrepancy, known as the Value Gap, and its causes. It examines the key arguments and evidence that have led to widespread acknowledgement of the discrepancy in Canada, and presents a road map to help build a stronger music ecosystem for artists and labels around the world.

Musician, label owner, and music festival founder Miranda Mulholland will close out the event with remarks explaining how weak copyright legislation has impaired her career. She will also reflect on the value of record labels in the modern music marketplace, and will demonstrate how artists can help establish a sustainable and functioning marketplace, outlining her own journey as an artist advocate.

Mulholland will then take the stage with Andrew Penner, her musical partner in the band Harrow Fair, to perform their unique blend of folk, country and garage rock music.

 

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Drake named 2018’s best-selling global recording artist by IFPI

The IFPI revealed their Top 10 Global Recording Artist Chart today, naming Drake as the world’s best-selling artist of 2018. The Toronto hip hop sensation is the sixth recipient of the IFPI Global Recording Artist Award, and the only artist to ever hold this title multiple times, with his first being in 2016.

Drake earned the top spot following the global success of his fifth album Scorpion, which was officially certified Double Platinum in Canada in July 2018, and includes the hits “God’s Plan” (8x Platinum), “In My Feelings (5x Platinum), “Nice For What” (4x Platinum). The 25-track double album broke multiple global records in its first week of release, including being the first album to reach one billion streams across all platforms worldwide.

“Drake has had an incredible, record-breaking year, one that is more than worthy of the title of Global Recording Artist of the Year,” says Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI. “That Drake has won this award for the second time is testament to his continued global appeal and his ability to engage and connect with fans.”

Drake is the only Canadian artist to receive the prestigious award, with previous recipients including One Direction (2013), Taylor Swift (2014), Adele (2015), and Ed Sheeran (2017), who remains on this year’s list at number 3.   

“This year’s Top Ten artists reflect the global appeal of music” Moore continues. “From modern-day superstars like Drake, Ed Sheeran and Ariana Grande, to the rise of genres such as K-Pop, to legacy acts like Queen, fans are exploring and enjoying music of all types and from all corners of the world.”

The full Top 10 list, which was counted down by the IFPI on Twitter, is now available below.

Top 10 Global Recording Artists 2018

1 Drake
2 BTS
3 Ed Sheeran
4 Post Malone
5 Eminem
6 Queen
7 Imagine Dragons
8 Ariana Grande
9 Lady Gaga
10 Bruno Mars
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IFPI releases Music Consumer Insight Report 2018, highlighting global trends in music listening habits

Today, IFPI released its 2018 Music Consumer Insight Report, an in-depth study of global music listening habits across 20 of the world’s largest music markets, including Canada, among music consumers aged 16-64.

“This year’s Music Consumer Insight Report tells the story of how recorded music is woven into the lives of fans around the world.  As it becomes increasingly accessible, it continues to be embraced across formats, genres and technologies,” said IFPI Chief Executive Frances Moore in a release. “Record companies are working with their partners to sustain and develop these rich and diverse ways in which music is being enjoyed, ensuring that it continues on its exciting journey around the world.”

One of the key highlights from the report is the ubiquity of on-demand streaming. 86% of consumers globally are listening to music through an audio or video on-demand service. 56% of listeners in Canada engage with music through on-demand audio services, just slightly below the global average of 61%.

Within this high usage of on-demand streaming though, it is user-upload services that continue to dominate consumption. The report notes that globally, 47% of time spent listening to on-demand music is on YouTube, compared to 28% on paid audio streaming services and 20% on free audio streaming.

Music piracy also remains a significant issue, as 38% of music consumers reported obtaining music through methods that infringe copyright. 32% of consumers report obtaining music through stream ripping, making it the most dominant form of copyright infringement.

“However, this report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face – both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said Moore. “Policymakers around the globe have been scrutinising these issues and increasingly acting to address them.”

Recent votes in the United States Senate and European Parliament have added even more urgency for Canadian policymakers to take similar action. Music Canada remains committed to working with the federal government to address the challenges hindering the proper functioning of our music marketplace, and to close the Value Gap in Canada.

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Artist advocacy takes centre stage at Midem 2018 during Value Gap event presented by Music Canada and IAEL

Entertainment lawyers have always played a crucial role in the success of their artist clients. But during Midem 2018, Miranda Mulholland urged them to take complimentary steps to empower artists and leverage their network to be connectors, helping to introduce, start discussions, and activate their artist clients.

Mulholland was the keynote speaker at a June 6 event hosted by Music Canada and the International Association of Entertainment Lawyers (IAEL) in Cannes, France. The Value Gap theme flowed through both this event and the launch of IAEL’s new book, Finding the Value in the Gap, later the same day.

Music Canada’s President and CEO Graham Henderson introduced Miranda and shared some opening remarks about Music Canada’s report The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-In-Canada Approach and thoughts on the vital role of artist advocates.

Two representatives from IAEL, including President Jeff Liebenson and Anne-Marie Pecoraro, as well as Lodovico Benvenuti, Director of IFPI’s European Office, joined Mulholland for a panel discussion following her keynote.

In addition to discussing the IAEL’s brand new publication Finding the Value in the Gap, the international experts leading the charge to address the Value Gap in multiple territories discussed how artists have been instrumental in their campaigns, including a letter to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. The letter was originally signed by more than 1,000 musicians and urges the Commission to address misapplied safe harbour provisions at the heart of the Value Gap to secure a sustainable and thriving music sector for Europe. Similarly, in Canada, more than 3,650 Canadian artists and creators have now signed the Focus On Creators letter to Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly calling on the government to put creators at the heart of future policy.

Guests at the Midem event included influential Canadian and international delegates, as well as members of the legal community, media outlets and European leaders in addressing the Value Gap.

You can watch the full keynote and panel discussion below.

Below is a selection of photos from the event and more information on Finding the Value in the Gap will be available on the IAEL website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Global Music Report 2018 shows industry experiencing growth from subscription streaming, but Value Gap needs to be addressed for long term sustainability

IFPI today released its anticipated 2018 Global Music Report, providing a state-of-the-industry guide to the top global markets and highlighting industry-wide trends.

While Canada dropped from the sixth to seventh largest music market in the world, the domestic music industry can be encouraged by marked growth in subscription audio streaming, which grew in trade value from USD $95.34 million in 2016 to USD $160.9 million in 2017. This trend has contributed to the first three consecutive years of growth following 15 years of revenue decline.

In Canada, ad-supported streaming declined slightly in 2017, representing USD $16.24 million in trade value, compared to USD $16.59 million in 2016. Video streams represented USD $23.32 million in trade value in 2017, rising from USD $21.56 million in 2016. The total trade value for all types of streaming rose from USD $133.5 million in 2016 to USD $200.4 million in 2017, a 50% increase. This is similar to the global trend where overall streaming revenues grew by 41.1%.

“I’m encouraged by the consecutive years of growth we’re witnessing. But as streaming continues its rise, it’s more important than ever that this business model supports the people making the music,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada.

“There are still regulations and cross-subsidies in place, in Canada and around the world, intended to get tech companies off the ground,” says Henderson. “These companies, like Google and Facebook, are now some of the world’s wealthiest and have unprecedented control over content online. Music Canada produced a comprehensive report on the Value Gap in Canada, and more than 3,600 Canadian creators have signed the Focus On Creators letter to the Canadian government asking for legislative help. Any future legislation, including the current Copyright Act review, needs to keep the well-being and future of Canadian creators top of mind.”

Frances Moore, Chief Executive of IFPI, also pointed to addressing the Value Gap as a top priority.

“The industry is on a positive path of recovery but it’s very clear that the race is far from won.” Moore explained in an IFPI release. “Record companies are continuing in their efforts to put the industry back onto a stable path and, to that end, we are continuing our campaign to fix the value gap. This is not just essential for music to thrive in today’s global market, but to create the right – fair – environment for it to do so in the future.”

Music Canada’s 2017 report, The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-In-Canada Approach, proposes a range of practical, forward-looking solutions tailored to Canada’s marketplace, institutions and legal framework.

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Ed Sheeran named 2017’s best-selling global recording artist by IFPI, as Canadians Drake and The Weeknd return to Top 10

IFPI Global Award – Ed Sheeran
Photo Credit: John Marshall – JM Enternational

The IFPI revealed their Top 10 Global Recording Artist Chart today, naming Ed Sheeran as the world’s best-selling artist of 2017. Sheeran is the fifth recipient of the IFPI Global Recording Artist Award, which recognizes an artist’s international success across physical and digital formats.

Sheeran earned the top spot due to his worldwide success of his album ÷ (Divide) and its multiple hit singles including Shape of You, Castle On The Hill, and Galway Girl. The best-selling album topped the charts in 31 countries and was certified multi-Platinum in 34 markets, including Canada, where it was certified Six Times Platinum. Sheeran also had the world’s best-selling single, as Shape of You topped the charts in 25 countries, and was certified multi-Platinum in 24 markets, including Canada, where it reached Diamond status. That marks the first time that the IFPI Global Recording Artist of the Year has had both the best-selling album and single of the year.

“Being crowned the biggest star in the world, with the biggest song and biggest album, is the result of years of ambition, creativity, and hard work on a global scale,” said Max Lousada, CEO of Recorded Music for Warner Music Group & Chairman and CEO of Warner Music UK. “Ed is truly an incredible songwriter, vocalist and performer, whose ability to tell stories and make people feel is what stands him out from the crowd. He’s always had a totally authentic connection with his fans, something he places over everything else. Congrats also to Stuart Camp, the Atlantic teams in the UK and US, and everyone at Warner who contributed to Ed’s amazing success story.”

Ed Sheeran presented with multiple award plaques for the album and its singles by Warner Music Canada.

“It’s wonderful to be able to announce Ed Sheeran as the IFPI Global Recording Artist 2017,” said IFPI chief executive, Frances Moore. “The success Ed has achieved is astonishing and testament to his ability to write and perform songs that connect with a truly global fanbase.”

Drake, who received the Global Artist Award in 2016, placed second on the chart this year. His mix tape More Life broke streaming records, including most first-day streams for an album on Spotify, and most streams in a 24 hour period on Apple Music. Fellow Canadian The Weeknd placed 7th on the chart this year, climbing up from the 10th position on the chart in 2016. Both Drake and The Weeknd have now placed in the Top 10 on this chart for three consecutive years.

“This year’s Global Top 10 really is a ‘who’s who’ of popular music,” continued Moore. “Each artist has a unique impact on the music industry through the talent and energy they are channelling through their work. I congratulate them all for such a successful year.”

The full Top 10 list, which was counted down by the IFPI on Twitter, is now available below.

Top 10 Global Recording Artists 2017

1 Ed Sheeran
2 Drake
3 Taylor Swift
4 Kendrick Lamar
5 Eminem
6 Bruno Mars
7 The Weeknd
8 Imagine Dragons
9 Linkin Park
10 The Chainsmokers

Previous Winners

2016 Drake
2015 Adele
2014 Taylor Swift
2013 One Direction

 

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IFPI’s 2017 Connecting With Music report includes Canadian insights

Today, IFPI released Connecting With Music, its 2017 consumer insight report with information from 13 of the world’s leading music markets. The report was created with data commissioned from Ipsos Connect, and provides a snapshot of the way music fans around the globe are engaging with recorded music.

In 2017, Canada became the sixth largest recorded music market in the world, surpassing Australia, and Connecting With Music offers insight on how Canadian music fans’ listening habits compare with other markets and global figures.

Global trends highlighted in the report include:

Young people are highly engaged with licensed music, especially streaming

Globally, 85% of 13-15-year-olds are streaming music. In Canada, streaming is even more popular among young people, with 89% of 13-15-year-olds reporting streaming music via both audio and video services. 99% of Canadians aged 16-24 identified as licensed music consumers, similar to the global average of 98%.

Music fans engage with licensed music in multiple ways

In Canada, music fans on average access four different licensed ways of listening to music, which is the same as the global average. The four consumption models are: purchase of physical product or paid downloads, audio streaming services for music, video streaming services for music, and listening to music on broadcast or internet radio.

Almost all Canadian internet users (99%) reported listening to licensed music, which is slightly higher than the global average of 96%.

Generally, Canadians are a little less engaged in licensed audio streaming (39%) than the average of global music fans (45%), and 46% of Canadians reported having paid for music in the last six months, compared to 50% globally.

Listening via smartphones is increasing

Overall, Canadians are using smartphones to listen to music a little less than the global average. Globally, 90% of paid audio streamers are using a smartphone to listen, compared to 81% of Canadian respondents. That gap reduces when considering the listening habits of 16-24-year-olds, 84% of which listen via smartphones globally, compared to 81% of Canadians in the same age bracket.

Despite high engagement with licensed music, piracy is still a significant concern

While the percentage of Canadians accessing unlicensed music (33%) was lower than the global average (40%), piracy remains a significant concern in Canada, with 27% of Canadians reporting stream ripping versus the global average of 35%.

Stream ripping is considerably more prevalent among young people, with 43% of Canadians aged 16-24 reporting stream ripping, and a global average of 53% in the same age bracket.

Of those who reported downloading unlicensed music, 54% of global respondents reported also using Google to find it. That figure for Canadian respondents is 46%.

The Value Gap remains an issue

Though video streaming services like YouTube are the most popular form of on-demand music streaming, the revenue returned to music creators from plays on these services is much lower than other licensed music services. 86% of Canadian YouTube users, and 85% of global users reported using the service for music in the past month, translating globally to 1.3 billion users.

One quarter of Canadians surveyed said that they do not pay for a streaming subscription because “anything I want to listen to is on YouTube,” confirming that the Value Gap is very much an issue here in Canada.

 

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