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Tag archive: Miranda Mulholland (36)

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Video: Canadian Music Data in 2021 at CMW’s Virtual Voices Series

Last week, Music Canada was proud to present a panel on Canadian Music Data in 2021, as part of Canadian Music Week’s Virtual Voices series. Canadians love music and data on streaming confirms it. MRC Canada’s data shows that Canada is reaching a new major milestone in streaming. Sometime soon, it’s expected that Canada will hit 2 billion songs streamed per week. The size and rapid growth of the streaming marketplace in Canada is an incredible achievement.

Brought to you by the RBC Emerging Artist Project, this panel featured insights from industry professionals on Canada’s strong, dynamic – but highly competitive – marketplace. Hosted by Rudy Blair, the panel featured a conversation with Erik Sowden, Head of Commercial Development at MRC Data; Alex Bellissimo, Director of Commercial Revenue at Warner Music Canada; and our moderator Miranda Mulholland, Artist and Music Canada’s Creative Culture Advisor.

Video of the panel is now available on Canadian Music Week’s YouTube channel, and is embedded below. 

Canadian Music Week has also announced that their 40th Anniversary event will take place April 19-23, 2022, from a variety of Toronto venues, with the in-person conference at Toronto’s Westin Harbour Castle from April 20-22.

For more information on upcoming panels in Canadian Music Week’s Virtual Voices series, as well as archived episodes, visit https://cmw.net/virtual-voices-series-presented-by-rbc-emerging-artists-project/.

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Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing Announce Executive Team Appointments

April 22, 2021, Toronto: CONNECT Music Licensing today announced the appointment of Catherine Jones as the new Vice President of CONNECT Music Licensing. Music Canada also announces Sarah Kilpatrick to the position of Vice President, Corporate Affairs, and Miranda Mulholland to the role of Creative Culture Advisor.

“It is an honour to announce Catherine Jones’ appointment to Vice President of CONNECT Music Licensing,” said Jackie Dean, President of CONNECT Music Licensing & COO of Music Canada. “Catherine has more than 25 years of experience that encompasses a wealth of knowledge in all areas of music rights and licensing. She has been instrumental to CONNECT Music Licensing’s success in her time with the organization,” continued Dean. “Each of these women bring exceptional knowledge and experience to our teams, strengthening our ability to drive research, advocacy and community leadership initiatives.” 

Jones joined the CONNECT Music Licensing team in 2017 and is a highly experienced and respected music rights specialist. Prior to joining the organization, she was the Director of Music Services at Bell Media, and the Director of Licensing & Synchronization at Universal Music Canada. She is also a part time Professor at Humber College in the Music Business Program.

“Music Canada’s team is made up of hardworking people dedicated to supporting the music industry and these appointments formalize our ongoing work,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Sarah Kilpatrick is Music Canada’s direct connection to policy makers in Ottawa. She joined our team with broad and impressive experience in intellectual property law, and her leadership and expertise has played a pivotal role in Music Canada’s success in her years with our organization.”

Kilpatrick joined Music Canada in September 2018 as the Director of Legal Affairs and Public Policy, and in her new role, will lead Music Canada’ public policy and communications teams.

“I am also pleased to announce Miranda Mulholland’s new title as Creative Culture Advisor,” continued Rogers. “It is the voices of artists, and their experiences that shape our message to government, and industry partners, and they will know what support is necessary for the music community’s recovery. Miranda is a champion for artists at every opportunity, and her contributions help shape Music Canada’s direction.”

Mulholland is a celebrated, JUNO nominated artist, record label owner and music festival founder. She has served as Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council since 2018, and has worked closely with the organization since that time, she is also the Vice Chair of Massey Hall, and Roy Thomson Hall. This appointment formalizes her contributions to Music Canada.

The appointments support Music Canada’s purpose: to advocate for music and its creators and the value they bring into our daily lives, with the support of our Members, Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada, and Warner Music Canada.

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
[email protected]
(416) 462-1485

 

About CONNECT Music Licensing
CONNECT Music Licensing administers licences in Canada for the reproduction of sound recordings, and the reproduction and broadcast of music videos on behalf of the copyright owners (usually the record companies).  A licence from CONNECT Music Licensing ensures that owners receive compensation for the use of their sound recordings and/or music videos.
In Canada, our members consist of all the major record companies, many of the independent labels, as well as artists and producers. 

About Music Canada
Music Canada represents Canada’s major record labels:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. We advocate for a healthy and vibrant Canadian music ecosystem, which includes labels, performing artists, publishers, songwriters, managers and others.

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Public Research Findings: Canadians understand the cultural and economic impacts of the pandemic on live music – and its need for continued support

February 8, 2021, Toronto: Music Canada has partnered with Abacus Data to check back in with Canadians on their understanding of COVID-19’s ongoing impact on Canada’s live music sector — and the effects that venue closures have on those working in the music sector and its lasting impact on communities, arts and culture. The public opinion research also explored how Canadians feel about venue closures and their views on the need for continued support for those working in the sector. The findings show that Canadians are concerned that without additional support, more live music spaces will be lost before the music community can recover, resulting in a longer threat to the industry and a negative impact on Canadian culture.

“This latest research confirms that Canadians view live music venues, like festivals, concert halls and pubs, as economic and cultural lifelines within their communities,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Canadians also understand that the pandemic will have severe impacts on the long-term viability of the live music sector which affects Canadian culture in the long run.”

“The research also confirmed what we have long believed to be true: music lovers can’t wait to get back to seeing live shows, once it’s safe to do so. But Canadians also believe that artists, live music venues, crews and others working in the industry will require continued support long after other sectors of the economy can reopen. Notably, most Canadians will be “disappointed” if more venues go out of business.”

According to the report, one in five Canadians has a favourite live music venue in their community where they attend events, and half believe it is likely the venue will close due to impacts of the pandemic. Canadians believe that further live music venue closures will mean thousands of jobs lost, fewer musicians and music will be created, and new and upcoming musicians will be lost without the opportunity of playing in live music venues. These impacts are felt across Canada, and even more strongly in Quebec.

“This research substantiates everything we’ve been hearing – Canadians are deeply saddened by the loss of live music venues,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the Canadian Live Music Association. “Venues are closing their doors in increasing numbers, for circumstances beyond their control and people are recognizing the extent of the loss, and what that loss means – economically, culturally, and socially. Direct financial support today from governments is urgently needed; it can keep more venues alive, helping us to preserve as much of our vital cultural infrastructure as possible until the industry can fully recover.”

“As an artist, it is devastating to see the severe and long-term impact the pandemic is having on the music community, after nearly a year of living with restrictions due to COVID-19,” said Miranda Mulholland, artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “Artists, and emerging artists especially, depend on live performances to develop their craft, generate a following, and gain income. The opportunity to do that, at every milestone in your career, is only possible with multiple venues from the smallest locations to the larger stages and concert halls.”

In a separate report expected to be released in the coming weeks, Music Canada is checking back in with Canadian artists and creators for a renewed perspective on how their profession has evolved at this stage of the pandemic. Data for these two studies will continue to be shared with government and industry partners in 2021. The findings are helping to shape Music Canada’s advocacy message, and give decision makers a complete and up-to-date picture of the recovery phase in the music industry. 

The Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA), the people behind live music in Canada are also working to bring awareness to the damage COVID-19 shutdowns have caused Canada’s live music industry and will make further information available here.

For more information on earlier study findings please visit Music Canada’s website here

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-government-support-music-canada/.

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
[email protected]
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Music Canada Launches New Artist Focused Survey

January 11, 2021, Toronto: Music Canada has partnered with Abacus Data to get a renewed understanding of how artists’ perspectives continue to be impacted, ten months into the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey will hear directly from artists on the financial implications they are experiencing, how the pandemic is impacting their ability to create music, and how they are building or evolving skill sets to help them get by.

Canadian artists are encouraged to add their voice by completing the survey linked at https://musiccanada.com/artist-survey-2021. The survey is available in English and French.

“Artists are often the most vulnerable in the music ecosystem. Projects like this help Music Canada explain to governments how the pandemic has affected us both financially and creatively,” said Eon Sinclair of Bedouin Soundclash.

In a separate survey, Music Canada is also asking Canadians about how their relationship with music continues to evolve. 

Data from these two studies will continue to shape Music Canada’s advocacy with government and industry partners in 2021. The results will help give decision makers a complete and up-to-date picture of the recovery phase in the music industry. This research will be made available publicly as soon as possible.

“As we quickly approach a year of restrictions preventing the normal activities of artists, it is important for Music Canada to check in with artists again,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Their voices and experiences shape our message to government and industry partners, as we find ways to help support the music community’s recovery.”

“As an artist, I know the pandemic is causing serious and very likely irreparable harm to artists in Canada,” said Miranda Mulholland, Artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “Long after other elements of the economy have reopened, artists, venues and support staff will require additional support for us to be able to return when the general public is also ready to do so. Government and public support will be necessary for this return.” 

For more information on earlier study findings please visit Music Canada’s website here.

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
[email protected]
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Public Research Findings: Threat to live music extended as more Canadians to avoid public events for longer

August 10, 2020, Toronto: Music Canada commissioned Abacus Data to conduct public opinion research to determine how the music industry is being impacted by Canadians’ changing feelings around music, during the pandemic. The second round of the national public opinion survey found that an increasing number of Canadians are concerned about COVID-19, and a growing number of them plan to avoid public events even after restrictions are lifted, resulting in a longer threat to live music.

“The ongoing triple threat facing the live music industry, and all mass gathering industries, requires government action,” said Patrick Rogers, Interim co-Chief Executive Officer. “This threat includes the medical concerns that Canadians have about the virus, that government restrictions on large gatherings will remain well into recovery, and that even after government restrictions are lifted, confidence in returning to live events will continue to be low.”

“Live music was one of the first sectors impacted by the pandemic, and it will continue to feel the impacts long after restrictions are lifted,” continued Rogers. “Artists, venues and support staff will require further support long after other elements of the economy have reopened.”

Concern among Canadians about the pandemic remains elevated, with more believing that “the worst is yet to come” than did in April. The research shows that even as economies begin to slowly re-open, more Canadians expect to stay away from live music events long after physical distancing restrictions are lifted. Even those who regularly attended live music events before the pandemic, 55% said that they will wait at least 6 months or longer to attend a music festival after physical restrictions end – and for large concert venues, it was 60%. Perceptions of risk for attending these types of events are rising over time – instead of declining. The findings ultimately point to the prolonged threat faced by the live music industry.

“This research confirms that Canadians continue to worry about the health impacts of COVID-19. While both artists and fans dearly miss the live music experience, it is clear that ongoing concerns about the virus will continue to significantly impact live events well into 2021,” said Jackie Dean, Music Canada’s Interim co-Chief Executive Officer. “The results show that certain safety measures will help attract some live music lovers back to live events – but many will remain hesitant.” 

Many Canadians want to get back to enjoying live music when it’s safe to do so. As the pandemic continues, the research found that self-identified “live music lovers” now miss live music even more than they did in April. 90% of respondents in this group now say “I really miss going to concerts” – and 89% of this group agree that digital content will never replace the feeling of seeing live music (an increase of 5% from polling conducted at the end of April). 

This research builds upon Abacus Data’s findings from earlier in the pandemic. In May, Abacus’ national public opinion survey identified the triple threat the music industry faces in its recovery from the impacts of COVID-19. 

Music Canada also commissioned Abacus Data to conduct national research that explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through the experience of Canada’s artists. That research found that professional musicians are feeling increasing pressure as a result of the pandemic, due to a reduction in income and their ability to produce music that threatens their ability to survive.

“The pandemic has had a devastating impact on artists’ ability to perform, to create, and to earn a living from their music,” said Miranda Mulholland, artist and Chair of the Music Canada Advisory Council. “While the findings are bleak, this series of research is providing valuable insights for artists, industry, and government as we look for safe ways to return to work. It is clear that artists and those who work closely with them in the live performance space will need further support as the economy begins to reopen.”

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-threat-pandemic-music-canada/.

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
[email protected]
(416) 462-1485

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Press pause: COVID-19 strategies for artists – On-Demand Webinar

The music industry is confronting particularly harsh and long-term challenges in the wake of the global pandemic. Cancelled and postponed concerts and tours have led to a dramatic drop in revenue. That being said, the demand for streamed music and performances could not be stronger, with people looking for comfort and content as they isolate at home.

To provide insight into the many legal issues that surround this widespread industry upheaval, Gowling WLG’s Entertainment and Sports Law Group – in partnership with CONNECT Music Licensing and Music Canada – recently presented a live Q&A webinar.  Featuring Susan Abramovitch, head of Gowling WLG’s Entertainment and Sports Law Group, Catherine Jones, executive director of CONNECT Music Licensing, and moderated by Miranda Mulholland, JUNO-nominated artist and advocate, the panel discussed timely and important topics for artists, including:

  • Protecting copyright in your works
  • Music licensing
  • Royalty collection

Video from the webinar is now available, and is embedded below. 

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Public Research Findings: Live Music Industry Faces Triple Threat During Recovery

May 14, 2020, Toronto: Music Canada commissioned Abacus Data to conduct public opinion research to determine how Canadians’ feelings around music have changed during the pandemic. The national public opinion survey gauged the comfort Canadians have for returning to live music as restrictions lift, and the results are startling. 

“As governments across Canada and the world increasingly shift their focus to recovery, this data from Abacus underscores the precarious position of the live music ecosystem – an ecosystem upon which artists rely for a significant, and in some cases predominant, portion of their livelihood,” said Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “The music industry faces a triple threat. First – the very real medical concerns of Canadians about the virus. Second – that government restrictions will remain on large gatherings well into recovery. And third – that even after government restrictions have lifted and economies begin to reopen – Canadian confidence in returning to these live events will continue to be low.”

The findings show that even of the self identified “live music lovers” – for many, it will be at least 6 months after government restrictions are lifted, before they feel comfortable going to: bars / pubs (28%); small venue concerts (35%); large venue concerts (42%); festivals (41%); community event with live music (31%). 

The research also demonstrated how important music is in helping Canadians to get through the pandemic. Nearly two thirds  (58%) of respondents reported feeling worse about the pandemic because of the cancellation of live music events. Half of those identified as “live music lovers” also reported listening to more music during the pandemic, and that for the vast majority (86%), listening to music is a way to relieve stress. 

“As an artist, what I’m finding I miss the most is the collaboration and connection I have onstage with my fellow musicians and that powerful, ephemeral experience that is created between artists and a live audience,” said Miranda Mulholland, Artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “What I find most heartening is that 84% of Music Lovers state that digital will never replace the live experience. Also, more than a third of respondents increased their music listening during this pandemic. These stats show that people clearly recognize the value and importance of music in their lives, perhaps more than they ever have.”

“Unfortunately, it’s clear that the pandemic will cause serious and possibly irreparable harm to Canada’s artists, the majority of whom were already living in a precarious state. We must continue to think about how we can help them through this as they’ve been here for all of us in this crisis,” said Mulholland.

Not only are these findings significant for the music industry, but they are important for the travel and tourism industries as well. As the government and music industry develops plans for recovery, they must understand that those whose businesses depend on large gatherings will continue to be affected by this pandemic for a much longer time. To that end, Music Canada will continue to assess Canadian’s changing perspectives on their comfort for returning to live music so that we can deliver this important and timely information to our partners.

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-after-pandemic/.

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
[email protected]
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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COVID-19 continues to hit the music industry’s most vulnerable: Music Canada survey

The COVID-19 crisis has created an unprecedented challenge for the music community, and has shed light on the sad realities faced by artists everyday. As Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council, I partnered with Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing to conduct an Artist Impact Survey. Developed in consultation with artist members of the Advisory Council and with Deloitte, the survey received responses from artists from across the country and across all stages of their careers. The preliminary results are in and they make crystal clear the serious and possibly irreparable harm the pandemic has had on Canada’s artists. The majority were already living in a precarious state – and this pandemic has only exacerbated their challenges. 

The financial impacts of this crisis on artists are widespread, and significant. When asked whether they would lose income due to the crisis, the answer was a nearly unanimous yes. Canada’s entire artist community is concerned about making ends meet: more than 80% of artists are in need of financial assistance. Many artists already live close to the poverty line, and now the pandemic has pulled the rug out from under them financially: almost half of the respondents reported that they have lost more than 75% of their income.

The impact on artists will ripple throughout our communities: Artists are entrepreneurs, and job creators. Respondents to the survey create an average of 3.7 jobs per artist – with artists unable to perform or create, these jobs will be lost as well.

There have been further impacts to the creative process. A majority of artists also stress that they are struggling to find the creativity and inspiration needed to generate work. This is especially true for those who are caring for children or loved ones at home. 

Also alarming is the significant number of people in our music community who report that they must go deeper into debt just to survive this moment in their lives. It’s clear that these losses are threatening the survival of entire sectors of the industry, and that the impact will be felt long after the pandemic ends. 

The Federal Government has taken important first steps for providing immediate relief to many individuals, including the self-employed, who have lost income due to COVID-19. The Canada Emergency Response Benefit is a key component for helping the hardest hit as they try to weather this storm. However, a post-COVID-19 environment needs to be one where artists can thrive. Artists have the power to generate massive economic growth – when they are supported. As concert halls, venues and theatres remain closed for the coming months, artists will need our sustainable support to ensure that they can cross the bridge over this chasm. 

The Unison Benevolent Fund offers a free 24/7 toll-free number to connect Canadian music professionals and their immediate family with counselling and health solutions in both English and French as well as emergency financial assistance, and I encourage those who may find this useful to reach out. 

It is a frightening time for everyone but heartening to note that we are collectively turning to art to make our way through this. Let’s support our creators however we can. For those who are quarantined at home, I encourage you to please continue to stream music over paid platforms and purchase merchandise online from your favorite artists to support them.   

Miranda Mulholland
Artist Advocate & Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council
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Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing Artist Impact Survey Release

March 24, 2020, Toronto: CONNECT Music Licensing and Music Canada are sharing an Artist Impact Survey designed to help the government and the music industry better understand the impact COVID-19 is having on artists within the community. At the heart of the entire community are the creators, and they are at this moment in time the most vulnerable. They deserve our attention and assistance. 

How can you help? If you are a musician: you can complete the questionnaire.  If you are anyone else: you can get this questionnaire into the hands of a creator. And everyone can share it through their social media. You can find our survey here: https://bit.ly/3ag79oH.

“COVID-19 has presented an unprecedented challenge for the music community as a whole, but for artists in particular,” said Miranda Mulholland, Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “It has been a welcome relief to see that the government has focused its initial efforts on the members of the gig economy – virtually all artists are self-employed. These people are most at risk, most under pressure and most in need in our music ecosystem. We need to provide the government with accurate and timely information on how and where to send help to those who are most in need. That is the purpose of our survey. Thank you to everyone who has already completed it. To those who have not, I urge you to complete it no later than March 27.”

The Artist Impact Survey was proposed by Miranda Mulholland, artist, label owner, festival founder and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council, developed in consultation with other valued artist members of Music Canada’s Advisory Council and Deloitte Canada. The survey has been circulated by artists on social media, distributed to CONNECT’s 2,500 artist-entrepreneur members, and through direct outreach to Music Canada’s members.

The information received will be tabulated anonymously in order to respect the privacy of our respondents. It will be incorporated in an economic impact analysis that Music Canada is developing with Deloitte Canada. The results of this study will be made public to enable all who care about our artists to make informed choices about how to help them. 

“Music Canada and CONNECT are pleased to have been able to lend their resources to this very important undertaking. We share Miranda’s belief that our first concern in these trying times must be to build a bridge to the future. We need to do this by protecting the most vulnerable now and with urgent haste. But we must also safeguard the infrastructure of our business so that when we do reach the other side – careers can be rebuilt,” said Graham Henderson, President & CEO of Music Canada. “There is a role for all of us to play as we look for solutions that allow all industry players to survive this crisis – this survey will help us find them.”

If you are an artist, we encourage you to fill out the survey which is available here: https://bit.ly/3ag79oH, and share it on your social media. 

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Erica Meekes
Director of Public Relations
Music Canada
[email protected]
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

 

About CONNECT Music Licensing
CONNECT Music Licensing administers licences in Canada for the reproduction of sound recordings, and the reproduction and broadcast of music videos, on behalf of the copyright owners. CONNECT’s members, which include all of the major record labels, many independent labels, and thousands of independent artists and producers, own or control the copyright in the vast majority of all the sound recordings and music videos produced or distributed in Canada. CONNECT Music Licensing represents its members at Re:Sound for the communication, public performance and private copying of their eligible sound recordings.

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Miranda Mulholland named runner-up for the Globe and Mail’s Canadian Artist of 2019

Music Canada extends our congratulations to Miranda Mulholland on being named a runner-up for The Globe and Mail’s Canadian artist of 2019!

In the article, John Doyle highlights Mulholland’s acclaimed solo album, By Appointment or Chance; the continued growth of the Muskoka Music Festival, which Muholland founded in 2017; and the galvanizing artist advocacy work she has conducted as examples of why Miranda was one of the most exciting Canadian artists of 2019.

In 2019, Mulholland was named a Global IP Champion by the Global IP Center, and spoke about artist advocacy at events in Canada and around the world, including the Folk Alliance International conference in Montreal, the World Intellectual Property Organization’s Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights in Geneva, at Midem and the MaMa Festival and Convention in France, and Canadian Music Week in Toronto.

The Globe named literary icon Margaret Atwood the Canadian Artist of 2019, recognizing the success of her highly anticipated book The Testaments, the success of the television adaptation of her classic novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Atwood’s book tour and philanthropic endeavors amidst a time of great personal loss following the passing of long-time partner Graeme Gibson. 

Joining Mulholland as runners-up for the Globe’s recognition include actor and director Philip Akin, film performer, writer, and director Deragh Campbell, artist and sculptor Brian Jungen, and masked country musician Orville Peck. 

Congratulations, Miranda! We are proud and grateful to have such a talented artist and strong advocate for creators as Chair of the Music Canada Advisory Council.

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