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Tag archive: MusiCounts (7)

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MusiCounts Band Aid Program applications now open

The MusiCounts Band Aid Program is now accepting applications from Canadian schools whose music programs are in need of instruments. Canadian elementary, junior high, secondary, and separate schools can apply to receive up to $10,000 worth of instruments to ensure their program’s sustained growth. Whether your school offers concert or jazz bands, rock band programs or anything in between, this grant supports diverse music programs across Canada.

Schools that apply by the early application deadline of October 16, 2017 will receive a SHURE MV5 USB microphone (while supplies last, approximately $100 value). Submissions will officially close on November 20, 2017.

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Toronto music industry raises more than $4,000 for Unison and MusiCounts at Blue Jays game fundraiser

In its second year, the Toronto music industry Blue Jays game raised an incredible $4,404.75 to support the Unison Benevolent Fund and MusiCounts. This is nearly double the amount raised in the event’s inaugural year, where $2,100 was raised in support of the Gord Downie Fund for Brain Cancer Research.

Jon Box of Universal Music Canada is the organizer of the annual event, and is already planning to surpass this year’s achievement in 2018.

“We are inspired by the work of our 2017 charities, MusiCounts and Unison Benevolent Fund, and our greater industry who supported the event with nearly 400 ticket purchases!” says Jon Box. “There’s nothing more gratifying than bringing people together for a good cause. We now have a 2018 goal to sell 500 tickets and raise $5,000. Looking forward to sharing details soon!”

Congratulations to everyone who helped to organize the event, donated prizes for the raffle/silent auction and attended the game. Thanks also to Steam Whistle Brewing, who donated event space and staff for a pre-game get together, as well as $1 from each beer sold to support Unison and MusiCounts.

Below is a selection of social media posts from the event:

MusiCounts celebrates musical excellence and puts musical instruments into the hands of kids who need them the most.  Their mission is to ensure that all children and youth in Canada have access to music education.

Unison Benevolent Fund provides counselling and emergency relief services to the Canadian music community. They are here to help professional music makers in times of hardship, illness or economic difficulties.

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CBC Music and MusiCounts announce Canadian Music Class Challenge

Photo courtesy of CBC / Radio-Canada

Photo courtesy of CBC / Radio-Canada

As students nationwide return to the classroom this week, CBC Music, in association with MusiCounts, has opened registration to music classes, music clubs, and after-school programs for the Canadian Music Class Challenge (formerly Canada’s Greatest Music Class).

Music classes from elementary through high school nationwide are encouraged to learn and upload a video of their class performing one of 16 selected Canadian songs to the CBC Music website between September 30 and November 23, 2016. A panel of musicians and CBC Music journalists will evaluate applications, with the winning classes receiving a commemorative plaque, and a high-tech classroom recording kit that includes a laptop computer, recording software, speakers, a keyboard, microphones, and more.

The regional shortlist will be revealed on December 7, and the winning classes will be announced on Radio 2 Morning on December 16.

Schools who participate in the Canadian Music Class Challenge also have the opportunity to apply for new instruments and equipment through MusiCounts’ Band Aid Program. Through this program, MusiCounts provides musical instruments in $5,000 and $10,000 value allotments to support public (elementary, secondary, and separate) school programs across Canada.

To enter the contest, a supervising teacher (the “Registrant”) of an eligible music class, after school program, or music club (the “Music Class”) must register their music class by completing the entry form and submit an eligible video performance and “publicity” photo during the submission period.

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The Sheepdogs & MusiCounts Celebrate Funds Raised for Niagara-area School Music Programs through Hockey Night in St. Catharines

Yesterday in St. Catharines, MusiCounts held a Band-Aid Celebration event at the DSBN Academy, which featured a special performance by three-time JUNO Award winners The Sheepdogs. The event was celebrating the $30,000 raised for MusiCounts through Hockey Night in St. Catharines 2014, supported by Music Canada and Partridge Wealth Management. DSBN Academy was one of three Niagara-area schools to receive $10,000 worth of instruments through MusiCounts’ Band-Aid Grant program, which has granted $595,000 worth of in musical instruments to 69 schools across Canada this year.

Local MP and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Heritage Rick Dykstra is the organizer of Hockey Night in St. Catharines, and was on hand to speak to the importance of music education and the impact that music can have in a community.

“Every year I have been amazed at the success of Hockey Night in St. Catharines and through United Way of St. Catharines and District, how we have been able to help fund vital programs for the disadvantaged in our community. But what is happening here today is pure magic,” said Dykstra. “Getting instruments into the hands of young people and giving them the gift of music is something that will enrich them all of their lives. I cannot thank MusiCounts, Music Canada and Partridge Wealth Management enough for helping all of this come together and I especially want to thank Ewan and Shamus Currie of The Sheepdogs for taking time out of their schedules to be with us on this very special day.”

During their performance, The Sheepdogs’ Ewan and Shamus Currie spoke of their own experience with music education growing up, and offered some advice to students at DBSN.

“Obviously music is a great opportunity, whether it’s a job or just a really awesome pastime or hobby,” said Ewan in an interview with Cogeco News. “I just want them to realize that maybe it seems difficult and a bit structured at first when you’re learning scales, and starting off with the basic building blocks, but it’s really a pathway that leads you to a lot of enjoyment and a really cool way to spend your time.”

Music Canada and our members Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada, and Warner Music Canada are proud supporters of the Band Aid Grant program. This is the third year of Music Canada’s partnership with MusiCounts, following a 2012 pledge of $250,000 over the next three years, which supports music education programs in schools in across the country.

Music education is a key priority of Music Canada as one of our five strategies in The Next Big Bang report, which recommends that given the strong evidence that music education prepares workers who are more creative, better problem-solvers, and possess soft skills that are critical in the digital economy, as well as the correlation between music scenes and tech clusters, governments should invest more in music education and should consider music scenes as a tool for economic development.

For more on the event, see coverage from TV Cogeco Niagara, Newstalk 610’s Larry Fedoruk Show, and the St. Catharines Standard, and the social media highlights below.

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Jeff Kula of Winnipeg’s River East Collegiate honoured with MusiCounts’ Teacher of the Year Award

Congratulations to Jeff Kula of Winnipeg’s River East Collegiate, who was honoured with MusiCounts’ Teacher of the Year Award yesterday in recognition of his passion and dedication to music education.

The MusiCounts Teacher of the Year Award recognizes the incredible, dedicated and hard-working music teachers in Canada who encourage music education for many young Canadians.

“Each year we receive a number of nominations on behalf of teachers who impact school communities across Canada,” says Allan Reid, Director, MusiCounts. “Choosing the one recipient of this annual award is never easy, but Jeff Kula’s commitment to his students and how he goes above and beyond the call of duty of a music teacher exemplifies the reason that we established this award to begin with.”

Gord Bamford, who is nominated for The JUNO Awards Country Album of the Year, was on hand to present the award at a surprise presentation at Kula’s school. This year’s award is sponsored by Gord Bamford Charitable Foundation, who also committed an additional $100,000 to MusiCounts over the next three years.

“If I wouldn’t have started music at a young age, and started in school, I probably wouldn’t be where I’m at today,” says Bamford. “It creates dreams. It’s a dream I eventually started chasing, and it’s come true for me. It all started in grade four and I have my teacher to thank for that. I want to make a difference, and giving back is the most rewarding thing that I’ve been able to do.”

Check out the video of River East Collegiate’s reaction to the news, care of CTV Winnipeg.

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Musicounts announces 2013-2014 Band Aid Grant recipients with help from Classified & David Myles

Today, Musicounts announced the 2013-2014 recipients of their Band Aid Grant program at Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School (JVCSS) in Scarborough, ON, which is one of 70 schools from across Canada who will receive a grant to support school music programs. This year, the Band Aid Grant program is awarding more than $600,000 in funds as part of Musicounts’ mission to ensure that children in Canada, regardless of socio-economic circumstances or cultural background, have access to a music program through their school.

Music Canada and our members Sony Music Canada, Universal Music Canada, and Warner Music Canada are proud supporters of the Band Aid Grant program. This is the second year of Music Canada’s partnership with Musicounts, following last year’s pledge of $250,000 over the next three years, which supports music education programs in schools in Toronto and across the country.

“Music education is a gift that keeps on giving – from the obvious benefit of inspiring our future generation of musicians, some of whom will go on to become ambassadors for Canada around the world, to preparing students for careers in a variety of disciplines including technology and science, to instilling respect in the creative process,” said Music Canada Vice President of Public Affairs Amy Terrill. “Music education is as important as the three R’s and we are proud to do a small part to ensure it remains a priority.”

The celebration was hosted by East Coast Music Award winner Kim Stockwood, and featured a terrific performance by the Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School band, as well as a surprise performance by JUNO Award winners Classified and David Myles.

ClassDavidsized

Classified and David Myles performed their hit songs “3 Foot Tall,” “So Blind” and “Inner Ninja” before revealing the instruments JVCSS are receiving as part of their $10,000 Band Aid Grant. The instruments will allow JVCSS and their musical instructor Michael Fanning to extend its popular music program to 75 additional students next year.

BandAidsized

For more photos from today’s event, view the album on our Facebook page.

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The Rambler by Graham Henderson: Analyzing Premier Wynne’s Inaugural Throne Speech’s Impact on Music

Graham_headphones3Blog ThumbnailThe Rambler is a column by Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. Graham writes from time to time about developments in the music industry, new trends or just about music! Let’s face it, Graham has been around for a long time and has a lot to ramble on about.

After having gone MIA for a few weeks in terms of my contributions to the Rambler, I am back with an analysis of Premier Wynne’s inaugural throne speech.

The last few months have been good ones for music in Ontario. Under the leadership of Minister Michael Chan, the Ontario government launched an ambitious plan to turn Ontario into one of THE global destination for music tourism. And with good reason. Music tourism is Ontario’s hidden, un-accessed super power, fueled by our live music scene. This is timely and visionary because the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, just this week, identified Canada’s poor performance in the tourism sector as one of our top 10 barriers to competitiveness. You can read about Ontario’s plan here.

So what do we know about Ontario? We know from our economic impact study that there are more than 7400 employed in live music in Canada, and we have estimated that over HALF of them are here. We know that we have one of the largest, most diverse music scenes in the world. That gives us a built in advantage. We know from the Discovering Ontario report that tourism is the largest employer of young people in this province. We know from a report by the Ontario Arts Council that 9.5 million overnight tourists to Ontario participated in arts and culture activities during their trips in 2010. For almost half of them music was the motivation for their trip. It is also a fact that arts and culture tourists stay longer and spend more. And that’s without a coordinated marketing plan. Imagine what we could do if we had a plan and devoted even modest resources to this? Well, that plan in underway NOW.

Last Friday I was honoured to have been invited to Premier Wynne’s first “Jobs Roundtable”. Meeting participants were asked to share their insights and recommendations on what the government and businesses can do together to create jobs – particularly for youth – in the immediate term. I had three specific, achievable recommendations in the areas of tax credits, music tourism and music education. All of which seemed to have been very well received.

Then today came the Throne Speech which included, likely for the first time in history, a mention of music. While the reference was muted, it nonetheless came in a key economic section and in the same breathe as sectors that have long enjoyed powerhouse status in Ontario, automotive and agriculture. Here is the reference:

“[The Government] will look to stimulate productivity across all sectors, from automotive and agriculture to film, music, and digital media; from small business to start-ups and social entrepreneurs.”

The proposals we have put in front of the Government would help to do exactly this, and in an achievable, manageable way. Ontario’s music cluster is ripe for growth. Over 80 percent of the economic activity of the sound recording industry in Canada takes place here. This sector is one of Ontario’s competitive advantages, as the Ontario Chamber of Commerce has noted. Revenues for the Ontario sound recording industry totaled $408 million in 2010. Ontario has not yet fully capitalized on the strategic advantage it enjoys in the global music industry. Targeted provincial support is needed. According to an independent analysis, strategic productivity and jobs-focused supports for Ontario’s sound recording industry would trigger 60 million dollars in additional spending, generate 1,300 new jobs and result in almost $300 million in new economic output. This proposal was highlighted in the Ontario Chamber’s Emerging Stronger 2.0 document.

While music was not specifically mentioned again, arts and culture was highlighted as one of the aspects of our society that makes Ontario a great place to live:

“It will prove once again that Ontario is a great place to work and live, but also to visit, to invest in, to believe in. It will celebrate our hard work, our ingenuity, our diversity, our arts and culture, and protect the beauty of our natural environment.”

And this is the message that we have delivered repeatedly to all levels of government for the past year or more. Arts and culture and in particular music, serve to both attract and retain talented people. This in turn has a significant impact on business recruitment, retention, and expansion, as well as local entrepreneurship. An economic plan that stimulates the music community will in turn help to stimulate the economy at large. The Throne Speech noted that creative jobs are in every region of Ontario noting as an example that “We have authors and artists and actors in Timmins…”

On the subject of education, the Throne Speech noted that:

“Our young people will experience a world of which we can now only dream, and we must all work together to ensure they are equipped with the appropriate tools for their time. They must be literate in the languages of tomorrow; encouraged to pursue the paths of their choosing and prepared for the challenges ahead. We must emphasize critical thinking, creativity, teamwork and an entrepreneurial spirit.”

What is encouraging here is that while not specifically mentioned, music education is widely regarded as a key component in developing young minds and preparing them for careers in not just music, but in science, technology and mathematics. But as I pointed out at the Jobs Roundtable, music education is Ontario’s abandoned “game changer”. There are many people reading this who will understand me when I point out that music has a transformative power to open minds, to enhance collaborative skills and to change lives. Highly successful people in various fields, including Commander Chris Hadfield, have spoken of the important role music education played in preparing them for their career. It should not be discarded and lost in the shuffle. Music Canada recently announced a major donation to music education through our partners at MusiCounts. A $250,000 dollar grant to acquire musical instruments for at risk music programmes. You can read about it here.

Our hope, therefore, is that this government will easily grasp the role music can play in helping to achieve its educational objectives. We will certainly stand ready to help.

All in all, another great day for music in Ontario.

Graham Henderson is the President of Music Canada. He also writes on an eclectic range of topics on his personal blog at www.grahamhenderson.ca.

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