Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

Join Mailing List

Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

 Music Canada

Tag archive: National Music Centre (9)

view

Barenaked Ladies & Steven Page announced as 2018 Canadian Music Hall Of Fame Inductees

The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences and CBC have announced world-renowned rock band Barenaked Ladies as the 2018 inductees into the Canadian Music Hall Of Fame. The induction, which will take place during the 47th Annual JUNO Awards, will find Ed Robertson, Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, and Tyler Stewart come together for a one-time special appearance with original member, co-founder, and singer-songwriter Steven Page in celebration of the group’s 30th anniversary.

“We are thrilled to be inducting the Barenaked Ladies, alongside Steven Page, into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. For nearly 30 years, their work has dominated charts both globally and domestically as they have grown to become one of the country’s most celebrated musical acts,” said Allan Reid, President & CEO CARAS/The JUNO Awards and MusiCounts. “We look forward to celebrating all of their achievements and welcoming them into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame at the 2018 JUNO Awards in Vancouver.“

Formed in 1988 in Scarborough, ON, the band has sold nearly 15 million records worldwide and earned countless accolades including eight JUNO Awards, two Billboard Music Awards and multiple Grammy nominations. Following the massive success of their self-titled independently released demo tape, known to fans as The Yellow Tape, the band released their debut studio album Gordon through Sire Records, which went on to earn Diamond certification status (1 million albums sold) in Canada. Eight of the bands albums have been certified Canadian Gold, along with two of their DVD releases.

“We are honoured to be inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame,” said Ed Robertson. “For almost 30 years we’ve worked hard to write the best songs we can, make the best records we can make, and do the best shows possible. We’ve traveled the world with our music, but Canada has always been home. This is very special for us.”

“I have so many great memories of my years with Barenaked Ladies, from our beginning in our parents’ basements to playing our songs for audiences all over the world,” said Steven Page. “I’m incredibly proud of all we achieved together, the greatest of all being the fact that our music continues to be a part of so many Canadians’ lives. Congratulations to the guys – I’m humbled by our induction into the Hall of Fame. Here’s hoping that next year we will be inducted into Hall and Oates.”

Barenaked Ladies will join the ranks of Canadian music icons in the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, including Alanis Morissette, Anne Murray, Blue Rodeo, Bruce Cockburn, Joni Mitchell, k.d. lang, Leonard Cohen, Neil Young, Oscar Peterson, RUSH, The Guess Who, The Tragically Hip, Shania Twain and 2017 inductee Sarah McLachlan. In 2016 the Canadian Music Hall of Fame found a permanent home with the opening of Studio Bell, home of the National Music Centre.

Tickets are on-sale now for the 47th Annual JUNO Awards, which will take place on Sunday, March 25, 2018 at Rogers Arena in Vancouver, BC.

Comments
view

Applications for the PASSPORT: Music Export Summit are now open

Canadian self-managed artists, artist managers, and music company entrepreneurs active in artist management have until December 15, 2017, to apply for the PASSPORT: Music Export Summit, a new program designed to prepare export-ready artists and entrepreneurs with training in business skills and artistic product development.

The program will begin with parallel East and West summits. The Music Export Summit West will take place in Winnipeg from February 21-25, 2018, and will also include a stream for Indigenous artists and companies. The Music Export Summit East will take place in Halifax from February 28 to March 4, 2018.

The PASSPORT website provides the following training overview:

  1. Importance and value of export for the Canadian music industry
  2. The challenges and opportunities of the global release landscape
  3. Market intelligence and specifics for target markets (UK, EU, USA)
  4. Developing an export marketing plan

Selected participants from these initial sessions will be chosen to attend a follow-up Masterclass event from April 8-12, 2018, at the National Music Centre in Calgary, in which they will conduct follow-ups on their export plans and create media assets for international marketing. The Masterclass will also include streamed live performances.

The eligibility guidelines on the PASSPORT website state that “Submissions will be accepted from export-ready artists and artist managers who are preparing for market development and export activities. Participants will have made initial inroads into international markets or are preparing for their first international showcase festival or tour in the coming 6-18 months. Participants will have taken part in foundational business training through their provincial music industry association, Canada’s Music Incubator, or regional music conferences, and have experience with basic administrative and music marketing tasks.”

The PASSPORT: Music Export Summit is produced by Manitoba Music in partnership with Music Nova ScotiaCanada’s Music Incubator, and the National Music Centre, and the project is funded in part by FACTOR, the Government of Canada and Canada’s private radio broadcasters.

For more information on eligibility, scheduling, and to apply, visit the PASSPORT: Music Export Summit website.

Comments
view

Canada’s Music Incubator and National Music Centre announce AE West program

Canada’s Music Incubator (CMI) and the National Music Centre announced a new partnership today to bring CMI’s highly regarded Toronto-based Artist Entrepreneur Program to Studio Bell in Calgary, AB. Artist Entrepreneur (AE) West will launch this fall, and the organizations have put out a national call for submissions.

AE West is a five-week creative entrepreneurship program (Nov. 7, 2017 – Dec. 8, 2017) to help emerging professional artists, of all musical genres, develop sustainable businesses and careers via hands-on mentoring, networking, and collaboration.

“Over the past three years our outreach programs have regularly visited Alberta and Western Canada. The result has been many artists deciding to travel to Toronto to work with us more extensively. By establishing a presence in Calgary, we will be more easily accessible.” said Vel Omazic, Executive Director of CMI in a release. “We intend to complement the work being done by our partners at the National Music Centre, Alberta Music and the Western Canadian music industry by contributing high-level expertise, access to ongoing mentorship and connectivity to the music industry in Toronto.”

“This is another example of National Music Centre investing in our regional music industry, by bringing this level of expertise and support closer to home for western-Canadian artists,” said Adam Fox, Director of Programs, National Music Centre. The program will cost $1,600 for artists, which will allow them access to the NMC’s facilities, including three recording studios, live rooms, classrooms, and archival collections.”

“AE West represents a great opportunity for artists living and working in Alberta,” said Carly Klassen, Executive Director of Alberta Music. “Alberta Music is proud to partner on this pilot program and is excited for the creative support, business development, and networking that artists from Alberta and beyond will have access to.”

Eligible artists must be 18-years-old or over and actively writing, recording, releasing (or about to release) music and performing live. Interviews will be conducted with appropriate candidates prior to program admission. The program is valued at $7,500, with the majority of costs being offset thanks to the generous support of TD Bank and the Viewpoint Foundation. The AE West program application is available at: http://canadasmusicincubator.com/aewest 

Comments
view

National Music Centre reveals programming for Bell Let’s Talk Day at Studio Bell

On January 25, 2017, Canadian musicians, including noted ambassadors Serena Ryder and Stefie Shock, will join millions of Canadians across the country in recognizing the 7th annual national Bell Let’s Talk Day, which aims to end the stigma surrounding mental illness. For every text, call, tweet, Instagram post, Facebook video view and Snapchat geofilter,  Bell will donate 5¢ more towards mental health initiatives in Canada.

In Calgary, AB, the National Music Centre will host a full day of programming focusing on mental health and music at Studio Bell. Singer-songwriter Séan McCann, a passionate advocate for mental health awareness, will play an evening concert following the day of free programming, which includes a mental health exhibition featuring regional community partners, and a lunchtime music therapy presentation with celebrated music therapist Jennifer Buchanan.

“The power of music to explore, treat and combat stigma around mental health is undeniable, and the National Music Centre is proud to partner with Bell Let’s Talk and a host of community partners to become part of this important national discussion,” said Andrew Mosker, President and CEO for NMC. “We’re also delighted to host Séan McCann as an artist in residence and look forward to him sharing some of his inspiring stories and music with us on January 25.”

At 7:00 pm, McCann, a founding member of Newfoundland’s multi-platinum selling group Great Big Sea, will perform a 90-minute concert featuring the stories behind his songs, a look into his recent artist residency, and incredible music. “I believe that music is strong medicine and that a song can save your life,” said Séan, who left the band in 2013 to deal with both alcohol addiction and coming to terms with the sexual abuse he suffered as a young man. Since then, Séan has been using his words and music to bring healing into his life and the lives of others.

“Bell Let’s Talk is proud to partner with the National Music Centre and Séan McCann to celebrate Bell Let’s Talk Day in Calgary,” said Mary Deacon, Chair of Bell Let’s Talk. “Featuring the therapeutic and healing powers of music for those living with mental illness is a wonderful way to participate in the conversation about mental health on Bell Let’s Talk Day.”

While tickets to McCann’s performance are sold out, you can still pop by on January 25 from 10 am to 5 pm for more mental health programming, courtesy of Bell.

Programming Schedule for Bell Let’s Talk Day at Studio Bell

10:00 am – 5:00 pm     Open to the public and community booths in Canada Music Square

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm     Session with leading music therapist Jennifer Buchanan

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm      NMC President’s Tour highlighting the healing and restorative power of music

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm       Kimball Theatre presentation “Why does Music make us feel emotions?”

7:00 pm – 8:30 pm       NMC and Bell Let’s Talk present Séan McCann (doors open at 6:30 pm)

Comments
view

Banner year for Canadian music celebrated at 2016 JUNO Awards in Calgary

The 45th annual JUNO Awards took place Sunday night in Calgary, AB, with thousands of music fans selling out The Scotiabank Saddledome to celebrate a spectacular year in Canadian music, and kick-off the peak season of the city’s Year Of Music. With performances by Bryan Adams, Shawn Mendes, Dean Brody and more, CTV’s 2016 JUNO Awards broadcast attracted an average of 1.4 million viewers, an increase of 2% from the 2015 show.

Toronto’s The Weeknd took home the most JUNO statuettes, with the R&B singer/songwriter collecting three awards during Saturday’s Gala Dinner, and two awards during Sunday’s broadcast including Album Of The Year (sponsored by Music Canada) for the Double Platinum album Beauty Behind The Madness. Brampton, ON newcomer Alessia Cara picked up her first JUNO for Breakthrough Artist of the Year following the success of her Platinum debut single “Here”, which she also performed during the broadcast.

On Sunday night, legendary singer/songwriter Burton Cummings was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame as a solo artist. 2016 JUNOS host Jann Arden, and nominees Shawn Hook and The Tenors, closed out the evening with a tribute performance to Cummings, which was followed by the celebrated artist taking to the stage with his band The Carpet Frogs.

During Saturday night’s Gala Dinner, Régine Chassagne of Montreal’s Arcade Fire accepted the Allan Waters Humanitarian Award for the band’s humanitarian efforts in Haiti. In 2006, Arcade Fire began donating a dollar of each concert ticket sold to global health organization Partners in Health and has since raised over $4 million, trained volunteers, and engaged fans in supporting Haiti.

Former Windsor CKLW music director Rosalie Trombley was also honoured at Saturday’s Gala, receiving the Walt Grealis Special Achievement Award which recognizes individuals who have made an impact on the Canadian music industry. Music legends Bob Seger, Gordon Lightfoot, Randy Bachman and Bob Ezrin, as well as Trombley’s children, provided touching remarks in a video tribute to the “the girl with the golden ear,” hosted by Sook-Yin Lee.

In the weekend leading up to Sunday’s awards broadcast, more than 100 acts including Buffy Sainte-Marie, Jim Cuddy, Lee Harvey Osmond, Whitehorse, Autumn Hill, Cancer Bats, and Rich Aucoin performed across 15 venues for the multi-day JUNOfest. By Friday night, wristbands to the festival had officially sold out, and venues across the city were buzzing with excitement for the jam-packed JUNO Week festival.

“I don’t think I’ve seen, honestly, the response to our tickets as strong in years,” said Allan Reid, CEO and President of The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. “JUNOFest (was) sold out, all of the clubs were absolutely packed (Friday) night, JUNO Fan Fare was packed, Junior JUNOS was packed — sold out. So we’re thrilled to be back here. It’s been an incredible reception. And obviously the weather doesn’t hurt either. Everybody has all smiles on their faces right now.”

According to Mayor Naheed Nenshi, JUNO Week is expected to make an economic impact between 10 and 15 million dollars for the city of Calgary. “One of the reasons that we’re doing the Year of Music this year is to have kind of a different view of the city of Calgary as we’re facing this economic downturn, so that people across Canada are thinking of us as a place of creativity and innovation,” Nenshi told reporters backstage.

From 2007 to 2015 the JUNO Awards have created a total economic impact of almost $99 million, including $11 million for the 2012 JUNO Awards in Ottawa, $14 million for the 2011 JUNO Awards in Toronto, and $10 million for the 2015 JUNO Awards in Hamilton. During the broadcast, Mayor Nenshi passed a JUNO award to Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson, as the city will once again host the JUNOS in 2017 for its year-long celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday.

Some JUNO attendees were also given a sneak peak tour of the National Music Centre, which is expected to open to the public this summer and provide an economic and cultural boost to the city.

“There’s no doubt that the launch of the National Music Centre is first and foremost one of the most intriguing points of hosting the Junos this year,” Marco De Iaco, chair of the Juno Awards host committee OutLoudYYC, told the Calgary Herald leading up to JUNO Week. “It was really the reason why we wanted to bring it back in this year, to get the National Music Centre out on the right foot.”

The National Music Centre was also a part of the University of Calgary’s announcement of Universal Music Canada’s donation of EMI Music Canada’s complete archives to the institution’s Library & Cultural Resources. The National Music Centre’s partnership with the university will allow for future public exhibitions and educational programming surrounding the archives.

The full list of 2016 JUNO Award winners can be found here.

Comments
view

Universal Music Canada donates EMI Music Canada archive to University of Calgary

Tom Hickerson, vice-provost (Libraries and Cultural Resources) at the University of Calgary

Tom Hickerson, vice-provost (Libraries and Cultural Resources) at the University of Calgary

As the city prepares for this weekend’s JUNO Awards festivities, the University of Calgary revealed today that Universal Music Canada (UMC) has donated EMI Music Canada’s complete archives to the university’s Libraries and Cultural Resources, which were acquired by the label in 2012 when Universal Music Group purchased EMI Music.

The University of Calgary has also partnered with the National Music Centre, which played a leading role in bringing the EMI archive to Calgary by connecting UMC with the university. The partnership will allow for collaboration on opportunities for the public to celebrate music in Canada through educational programming and exhibitions that highlight the archive.

“Plans for an educational component around music and the ambitions for this archive are tremendously exciting,” said Jeffrey Remedios, President and CEO of UMC, who spoke at Thursday’s announcement along with Deane Cameron, former President and CEO of EMI Music Canada, and celebrated Canadian artist Tom Cochrane. “EMI Music Canada became the source of the music many Canadians grew up listening to. It’s such a rich and treasured history and it’s terrific that generations to come will have the opportunity to explore that.”

In addition to the gift of the EMI Music Canada Archive, Universal Music Canada will provide substantial funding over several years to support the preservation and management of the collection.

“We are eager to work with Universal Music Canada and the University of Calgary to explore programming and exhibition opportunities that bring the wealth of this collection to Canadians,” said Andrew Mosker, President and CEO for the National Music Centre. “From our burgeoning music scene, the opening of Studio Bell this summer and this incredible archive, it is safe to say that Calgary is becoming a serious music city.”

Spanning from 1949 to 2012, the EMI Music Canada Archive collection consists of 5,500 boxes containing more than 18,000 video recordings, 21,000 audio recordings and more than two million documents and photographs. Over 2,500 Canadian and international artists are represented in the archive, which includes master recordings, publicity photos, demo tapes, album cover art, creative outlines for music videos, marketing plans, awards, drafts of song lyrics and correspondence between artists, producers, engineers and EMI Music Canada executives.

Established in 1949, EMI Music Canada included Capitol Records Canada and was the recording company for a range of Canadian artists, including Anne Murray, Tom Cochrane, Sarah McLachlan, Nickelback, Glass Tiger, Kim Mitchell, Helix and the Rankin Family. The company was also the Canadian distributor for major international acts such as the Beatles, Rolling Stones, David Bowie, Duran Duran, Frank Sinatra, the Beach Boys, Heart, Smashing Pumpkins, Garth Brooks, Pink Floyd, Queen and Iron Maiden.

Visit the University of Calgary’s website for more information on the archive acquisition and view the video below for a sample of what the collection has to offer.

Comments
view

Calgary kicks off Year of Music

2016 is now, officially, the Year of Music in Calgary. Mayor Naheed Nenshi issued a proclamation outlining the multitude of music events taking place in Calgary this year, as well as recognizing the talents of Calgary musicians and the economic benefits of the music sector, at an event in the observation deck of the Calgary Tower yesterday.

“Calgary is home to a vibrant music scene. Each year our city produces hundreds of festivals, events, concerts, shows and performances in venues ranging from elegant concert halls to local parks to vintage clubs filled with character,” the proclamation reads. “This year we celebrate the extraordinary talents of musicians who make their living here, the burgeoning music economy and all those whose efforts contribute to the musical vitality of our community.”

Cited among the reasons that 2016 will be such a remarkable year for music in Calgary are:

  • The 45th annual JUNO Awards, taking place April 3rd at the Scotiabank Saddledome
  • The launch of Studio Bell, home of Canada’s National Music Centre, opening in East Village this summer
  • The 60th Anniversary of the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra
  • The 50th Anniversary of the Alberta Ballet
  • The 30-plus musical festivals that take place in Calgary annually and enrich the city’s cultural environment

The announcement coincided with the launch of this year’s One Yellow Rabbit High Performance Rodeo, Calgary’s International Festival of the Arts, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2016. The event runs from January 7th through 31st, at 14 venues across Calgary.

The event also revealed the songs that make up the Calgary Songs Project, which compiles 30 songs released by Calgary artists over the past 30 years, in celebration of the High Performance Rodeo’s 30th anniversary. The list, compiled by the High Performance Rodeo, songwriter Kenna Burima, and the Calgary Cassette Preservation Society, can be heard in a variety of ways during the Rodeo:

As part of the Year of Music celebrations, Tourism Calgary has launched a new website, www.pushplaycalgary.com, which features live music listings and markets Calgary as a destination for music tourists. The Year of Music could bring an economic boost to Calgary’s tourism economy, said Tourism Calgary’s Jeff Hessel in MetroNews.

“What makes next year special is that we have the Junos, and the opening of the National Music Centre definitely makes it a very special year,” said Hessel. “We’re here to increase the economic impact of tourism for Calgary. If we can do anything that increases incremental visitation and spending for Calgary, then we’ll do that.”

Mayor Nenshi also touted the economic and city-branding benefits of music in an address at the Calgary City of Commerce last month.

“At a time when the Canadian dollar is low, it’s an opportunity to attract tourism right now. I love music, but it’s also a marketing opportunity to rebrand ourselves to a national and international audience about the culture, the vitality and the life here in the city,” the mayor is quoted as saying in MetroNews.

In the same article, the National Music Centre’s Andrew Mosker backs up the mayor’s statements on music’s economic impact, pointing to the Alberta Music Cities Initiative’s Fertile Ground report, which outlines a strategy for a stronger provincial music sector. Music Canada authored the report in 2014 after being commissioned by the NMC to take a critical look at Alberta’s music landscape.

The Year of Music celebrations continue tonight, with the launch of Music Mile, which recognizes the stretch of Calgary’s 9th Avenue from the Blues Can in Inglewood to Studio Bell in East Village as a music mecca. Home to live music venues such as Ironwood Stage & Grill, The Lantern Church, Festival Hall, and Vagabond Calgary, Music Mile brands the area as a formal music district where fans can find live music any day of the week.

Invoking the success of music districts such as Nashville’s Broadway and New Orleans’ French Quarter, Music Mile organizers spoke of the value of branding the location of Calgary’s music scene in an interview with Global Calgary.

“All over the world there’s this notion of a place where you go for music, not just a venue,” said Bob Chartier.

”Everybody sees this as a place-making project – having a district, rather than just a club to go to,” added Meg Van Rosendaal.

With all of the action happening in Calgary in 2016, it’s clear that Year of Music is more than a slogan. It’s a reflection of Calgary’s rise as a cultural hotspot and live music destination. For more on all the events happening in Calgary this year, see the video below, and visit www.pushplaycalgary.com.

Comments
view

Calgary To Host The 2016 JUNOS

The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences (CARAS) has announced that Calgary, Alberta will play host to the 45th annual JUNO Awards and JUNO Week celebrations in 2016. Calgary first hosted to JUNOs in 2008 and after a successful community-based bid led by Tourism Calgary, the city will again welcome Juno Week March 28 – April 3, 2016.

“We’re delighted that the JUNO Awards will be returning to Calgary for the first time in eight years,” said Cindy Ady, CEO of Tourism Calgary. “2016 will be a great year for music in Calgary as we highlight Canada’s best musical talents during JUNO Week, followed by the opening of the highly anticipated National Music Centre later in the year.”

Hosting a major national event like the JUNO Awards falls in line with the Alberta Music Cities Initiative (AMCI) and the Fertile Ground 2014 report, which outlines several recommendations on how music can be positioned as a vehicle for the diversification of Alberta’s economy and a tool that municipalities can use to stimulate economic growth, increase investment, retain youth, and drive tourism.

In 2008, the Juno Awards generated a total economic impact of $11.3 million for the city of Calgary. From 2007 to 2014 the JUNO Awards have created a total economic impact of almost $88 million combined from its hosting cities like Toronto ($14 million), Regina ($10 million) and Calgary.

“To bring the industry to Calgary and let them see the NMC is just too good of an opportunity to have go by,” said Allan Reid, President & CEO of CARAS/The JUNO Awards, when speaking with The Calgary Herald. “It just feels like such a great opportunity to be in Calgary around the time to help them launch that.”

When it is completed, the new 160,000-square-foot facility will house the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, the Canadian Country Music Association Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame, as well as community and education programs.

“I’m thrilled Calgarians will once again be hosting the JUNO Awards,” said Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi, who will be in attendance at next month’s JUNO Awards in Hamilton, ON. “This is a tremendous opportunity for Calgary and our music and culture scene.”

The 45th annual JUNO Awards will be broadcast on CTV from The Scotiabank Saddledome on Sunday, April 3, 2016.

Comments
view

National Music Centre releases Fertile Ground, a new report exploring economic opportunities in Alberta’s music industry

Today, the National Music Centre (NMC) released Fertile Ground: Alberta Music Cities Initiative, a new report on Alberta’s music sector that outlines the economic benefits of a strong provincial music industry. The report identifies the unique opportunity for the development of Alberta’s music sector and provides four key recommendations for further growth.

The NMC commissioned Music Canada to author the report, which was supported by funding from the Scotlyn Foundation. In a release, NMC President and CEO Andrew Mosker said the report was inspired by Music Canada’s success in demonstrating the value of provincial and municipal live music strategies in Ontario.

“Graham and Paul Lessard with the Scotlyn Foundation approached us, eager to do something meaningful for Alberta’s music industry,” said Mosker. “I was very aware of the incredible work Music Canada had done in Ontario, and wondered if the same strategic business approach could work in Alberta.”

The report notes that Alberta is already home to a number of key music assets, and that a strategic initiative to develop the music cluster would create the opportunity for diversification of the Alberta economy.

“This report is about breaking music out of the cultural box, and into the general consciousness of Alberta’s economic leaders, demonstrating its value and ability to attract and retain creative talent, support tourism and inspire investment across a variety of economic sectors, thereby supporting efforts to diversify Alberta’s economy,” said Amy Terrill, VP of Public Affairs at Music Canada and author of the Fertile Ground report.

Music Canada and NMC consulted a variety of stakeholders across Alberta in researching the report, including Alberta Music, tourism agencies, arts and culture organizations, and Alberta Chambers of Commerce. The report found that a strategic music initiative would “closely align with the priorities of numerous agencies and commissions involved in economic development, tourism and related fields, suggesting that it will be well received throughout the province.”

The four key recommendations to government and other sector partners are:

  • Develop a comprehensive understating of the economic profile of Alberta’s music cluster, with regional breakouts for Calgary and Edmonton as well as other smaller cities as appropriate.
  • Position music as a key economic sector, a vehicle for the diversification of Alberta’s economy, and a tool that municipalities can use to stimulate economic growth, increase investment, retain youth, and drive tourism.
  • Develop and implement a strategic plan to build the business capacity of the music industry in Alberta.
  • Develop and implement a live music strategy for Alberta to improve the live music product offering in Alberta and generate increased music tourism.

To view the full Fertile Ground report, visit the NMC site at www.nmc.ca/amci.

Comments

This website made possible with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.