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Tag archive: streaming (5)

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IFPI’s Global Music Report 2019 illustrates streaming’s continued rise in Canada and around the globe

IFPI’s anticipated annual State of the Industry” report is now available and paints a picture of an industry transformed by evolving listening trends and emerging markets. Overall, the global music industry experienced its fourth year of consecutive growth, with an increase of 9.7% in 2018. Much of that growth across the globe is attributed to streaming, which increased by 34% and accounted for almost half of global revenue at 47%.

Streaming accounted for 60% of recorded music revenues in Canada in 2018, and increased in trade value by 31.9% from USD $200.7 million in 2017 to USD $264.8 million in 2018. Of that streaming revenue, USD $211.8 million came from subscription audio streams, USD $26.78 million came from ad-supported audio streams, and USD $26.21 million came from video streams. After streaming, the next leading sources of recorded music revenues are “other digital” at 15%, physical sales at 15% and performance rights and synch at 11%.

The reports also list five key elements to fostering fair marketplaces so music continues to thrive. Those elements are:

  • Music’s value must be recognized;
  • Copyright frameworks must be clear and provide legal certainty;
  • Rights holders must be free to decide who can use their music and how;
  • Music must be licensed on fair terms, and;
  • Adequate tools must be available to prevent music from being made available illegally.

Securing sustainable growth for today’s digital music industry will be the topic of focus this Friday in Geneva, as Music Canada and IFPI present ‘An Industry Transformed’ during the convening of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

The top digital single of 2018 in Canada was “God’s Plan” by Drake, who was awarded IFPI’s 2018 Global Artist of the Year Award in February of 2019, becoming the only artist to ever win the award twice. The top digital single worldwide in 2018 was “Havana” by Camila Cabello (feat. Young Thug) with “God’s Plan” in the number two position. The top album of 2018 in Canada was Drake’s Scorpion, and globally was The Greatest Showman (OST) by Cast of ‘The Greatest Showman.’

IFPI’s Global Music Report 2019: State of the Industry is available for download on IFPI’s website.

 

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IFPI releases Music Consumer Insight Report 2018, highlighting global trends in music listening habits

Today, IFPI released its 2018 Music Consumer Insight Report, an in-depth study of global music listening habits across 20 of the world’s largest music markets, including Canada, among music consumers aged 16-64.

“This year’s Music Consumer Insight Report tells the story of how recorded music is woven into the lives of fans around the world.  As it becomes increasingly accessible, it continues to be embraced across formats, genres and technologies,” said IFPI Chief Executive Frances Moore in a release. “Record companies are working with their partners to sustain and develop these rich and diverse ways in which music is being enjoyed, ensuring that it continues on its exciting journey around the world.”

One of the key highlights from the report is the ubiquity of on-demand streaming. 86% of consumers globally are listening to music through an audio or video on-demand service. 56% of listeners in Canada engage with music through on-demand audio services, just slightly below the global average of 61%.

Within this high usage of on-demand streaming though, it is user-upload services that continue to dominate consumption. The report notes that globally, 47% of time spent listening to on-demand music is on YouTube, compared to 28% on paid audio streaming services and 20% on free audio streaming.

Music piracy also remains a significant issue, as 38% of music consumers reported obtaining music through methods that infringe copyright. 32% of consumers report obtaining music through stream ripping, making it the most dominant form of copyright infringement.

“However, this report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face – both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said Moore. “Policymakers around the globe have been scrutinising these issues and increasingly acting to address them.”

Recent votes in the United States Senate and European Parliament have added even more urgency for Canadian policymakers to take similar action. Music Canada remains committed to working with the federal government to address the challenges hindering the proper functioning of our music marketplace, and to close the Value Gap in Canada.

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Global Music Report 2018 shows industry experiencing growth from subscription streaming, but Value Gap needs to be addressed for long term sustainability

IFPI today released its anticipated 2018 Global Music Report, providing a state-of-the-industry guide to the top global markets and highlighting industry-wide trends.

While Canada dropped from the sixth to seventh largest music market in the world, the domestic music industry can be encouraged by marked growth in subscription audio streaming, which grew in trade value from USD $95.34 million in 2016 to USD $160.9 million in 2017. This trend has contributed to the first three consecutive years of growth following 15 years of revenue decline.

In Canada, ad-supported streaming declined slightly in 2017, representing USD $16.24 million in trade value, compared to USD $16.59 million in 2016. Video streams represented USD $23.32 million in trade value in 2017, rising from USD $21.56 million in 2016. The total trade value for all types of streaming rose from USD $133.5 million in 2016 to USD $200.4 million in 2017, a 50% increase. This is similar to the global trend where overall streaming revenues grew by 41.1%.

“I’m encouraged by the consecutive years of growth we’re witnessing. But as streaming continues its rise, it’s more important than ever that this business model supports the people making the music,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada.

“There are still regulations and cross-subsidies in place, in Canada and around the world, intended to get tech companies off the ground,” says Henderson. “These companies, like Google and Facebook, are now some of the world’s wealthiest and have unprecedented control over content online. Music Canada produced a comprehensive report on the Value Gap in Canada, and more than 3,600 Canadian creators have signed the Focus On Creators letter to the Canadian government asking for legislative help. Any future legislation, including the current Copyright Act review, needs to keep the well-being and future of Canadian creators top of mind.”

Frances Moore, Chief Executive of IFPI, also pointed to addressing the Value Gap as a top priority.

“The industry is on a positive path of recovery but it’s very clear that the race is far from won.” Moore explained in an IFPI release. “Record companies are continuing in their efforts to put the industry back onto a stable path and, to that end, we are continuing our campaign to fix the value gap. This is not just essential for music to thrive in today’s global market, but to create the right – fair – environment for it to do so in the future.”

Music Canada’s 2017 report, The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-In-Canada Approach, proposes a range of practical, forward-looking solutions tailored to Canada’s marketplace, institutions and legal framework.

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Canadian artists top Spotify 2015 Year in Music lists

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On Monday, streaming service Spotify revealed their 2015 Year in Music top lists, which find Canadian artists Drake, The Weeknd, Justin Bieber, Alessia Cara and Francesco Yates as some of 2015’s most listened to artists in the world.

Proud Toronto-native Drake was announced as the most streamed artist of 2015 with over 1.8 billion streams this year and 46 million listeners. He takes the title from 2014’s most streamed artist Ed Sheeran, who in 2015 was announced as the most streamed artist of all time.

Drake’s 2015 mixtape If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late was the second most-streamed album globally behind Canadian The Weeknd‘s Beauty Behind The Madness. In the US, the order is flipped, with Drake’s album being the most streamed this year. Based on sales numbers, both albums have been certified Platinum in Canada.

On November 13, Justin Bieber released his highly-anticipated album Purpose, which helped the artist set the record for most streams in a single day of all time with 36 million streams.

The #1 most viral track globally belongs to German DJ Robin Schulz for his track “Sugar” which features Canadian labelmate Francesco Yates. Canadians claimed 3 more spots in the top 5 of this list, with Drake’s “Hotline Bling” at #2, The Weeknd’s “Can’t Feel My Face” at #4 and Alessia Cara’s “Here” at #5.

The full Year in Music top lists can be viewed on Spotify’s blog.

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Graham Henderson on Taylor Swift, Apple, and the Canadian music industry

Music Canada applauds Apple Music’s decision to reconsider its earlier plans to not pay artists during its three-month free trial period, and we commend Taylor Swift for standing up for artists. In an open letter to Apple that she released on June 22, she writes that she wanted to speak up not for herself, but for “the new artist or band that has just released their first single and will not be paid for its success. This is about the young songwriter who just got his or her first cut and thought that the royalties from that would get them out of debt. This is about the producer who works tirelessly to innovate and create, just like the innovators and creators at Apple are pioneering in their field… but will not get paid for a quarter of a year’s worth of plays on his or her songs.”

The decision comes after major backlash over the deal both in Canada and abroad, with many independent labels and advocacy groups speaking against Apple.

Yesterday, Music Canada President Graham Henderson appeared on BNN, the Sandie Ronaldo show and CTV’s national news to discuss how this decision will impact Canadian consumers, artists, and the digital music industry as a whole.

Apple’s ‘Swift’ action a step towards bringing back middle class musicians
BNN, June 22 2015

 

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