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Meredith Shaw performs at Music Canada office

Thanks to Meredith Shaw for visiting and performing at the Music Canada office today! Meredith played a short set of songs from her new EP, ‘Hardest Goodbye,’ including the title track and ‘Slide.’ A few dozen people took in the mid-afternoon set including our neighbours from the Liberty Village business community. Our thanks to Charlotte Thompson of Red Umbrella PR as well, who handles publicity for Shaw and suggested the performance.

‘Hardest Goodbye’ is Meredith’s second EP in a series of three 3-song EP recordings, and was released just yesterday via eOne Music Canada. The EP was produced by John-Angus Macdonald of the multi-platinum certified band The Trews, and follows 2013’s release of ‘Trouble,’ which was produced by acclaimed artist Joel Plaskett.

Meredith will be performing at her Toronto release party tomorrow night (Thursday, March 6th) at The Cameron House at 408 Queen St. West, which will also feature a performance by Andrew Austin. The show begins at 8pm, admission is $10 at the door.
You can also catch her on Canada AM tomorrow morning, when she’ll play ‘Hardest Goodbye’ on the AM Soundstage.

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Tom Cochrane Announced As A 2014 Inductee To The Canadian Music Industry Hall Of Fame At Canadian Music Week 2014

Congratulations to Tom Cochrane, who has just been announced as a 2014 inductee to the Canadian Music Industry Hall of Fame by Canadian Music Week!

The award winning and Diamond-certified singer, songwriter, producer, activist and Canadian icon will be honoured at the Canadian Music & Broadcast Industry Awards gala, taking place on Thursday, May 8, 2014 at the Kool Haus in Toronto.

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OMDC announces key dates for Ontario Music Fund program Years 2 and 3

The Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC) has announced the key dates for years 2 and 3 of the Ontario Music Fund.

As per the release, application launch dates, deadlines, and funding decisions timelines for the four streams of the Ontario Music Fund are as follows:

Music Company Development:
Year 2 (2014 – 15)

  • Application launch: Early April 2014
  • Deadline: May 30, 2014
  • Activity period: July 1, 2014 -July 31, 2015
  • Funding decisions: Early September, 2014

Year 3 (2015-16)

  • Application launch: Mid-March, 2015
  • Deadline: May 15, 2015
  • Activity period: July 1, 2015 –July 31, 2016
  • Funding decisions: Mid-September, 2015

Music Industry Development:
Year 2 (2014-15)

  • Application launch: Early May, 2014
  • Deadline: December 31, 2014
  • Activity period: April 1, 2014–May 31, 2015
  • Funding decisions: ongoing to late January/Early February, 2015

Year 3 (2015 – 16)

  • Application launch: Early March, 2015
  • Deadline: December 31, 2015
  • Activity period: April 1, 2015 – May 31, 2016
  • Funding decisions: ongoing to late January/Early February, 2016

Live Music:
Year 2 (2014 – 15)

  • Application launch: Mid – April 2014
  • Deadline: June 16, 2014
  • Activity period: August 1, 2014 – August 31, 2015
  • Funding decisions: Mid – September, 2014

Year 3 (2015 – 16)

  • Application launch: Early March, 2015
  • Deadline: April 30, 2015
  • Activity period: July 1, 2015 –August 31, 2016
  • Funding decisions: End of July, 2015

Music Futures:
Year 2 (2014 – 15)

  • Application launch: Early May 2014
  • Deadline: June 30, 2014
  • Activity period: May1, 2014 –May 1, 2015
  • Funding decisions: Late September, 2014

Year 3 (2015 – 16)

  • Application launch: Mid – March, 2015
  • Deadline: May 29, 2015
  • Activity period: April 1, 2015 –April 1, 2016
  • Funding decisions: Early September, 2015

For further information on the Ontario Music Fund, visit the OMDC’s website at http://www.omdc.on.ca/music/the_ontario_music_fund.htm.

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Music Remains – A Recorded Music Rube Goldberg Machine

The IFPI has released a new film called Music Remains that illustrates that throughout all of the technological changes in our industry, there has been one constant: the music.

Shot at historic Abbey Roads studios, this compelling 90 second video features a Rube Goldberg machine showing various recorded music technologies.

Launched today, MusicRemains.org features the video, a ‘making of’ documentary, and lyrics of the rap in the video.

“The idea was to convey the message that, while technology may be continuously changing, recorded music is always at the centre of people’s lives”, says creative director Steve Milbourne. “At the same time, we wanted to it to be a very personal story. Pepstar’s lyrics are about key experiences – from the meeting of our parents to childhood memories, first girlfriends and family tragedy.”

Check out the video and feel free to share it using the hashtag #MusicRemains.

 

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Blue Rodeo named official 2014 Record Store Day Spokesband by Record Store Day Canada

Record Store Day Canada has named Blue Rodeo the official spokesband for Record Store Day 2014, happening April 19, 2014 at independent record stores across Canada and the world.

The JUNO Award winning and multi-platinum certified band waxed poetic on their love for record stores in a new video released by Record Store Day Canada.

“When my kids began to develop their own unique tastes in music I took them to their first independent record store. It was like a whole new world had opened to them. The fact of the matter is those record stores are so much more than just merchandise sellers. They are a social service. Like-minded people sharing their love and knowledge of music. My children have never lost their connection to independent record stores and their knowledge of music is now broad and unique”, said Jim Cuddy in a release.

“Growing up, records were our religion. They were our statements of cool. We carried them from party to party, rec room to rec room, symbols of our hipness. It’s funny, things haven’t changed that much. Go buy some records. Take a trip!”, added Greg Keelor.

Earlier this week, Record Store Day announced hip-hop artist and social activist Chuck D would be the official Ambassador of Record Store Day 2014 south of the border, following in the footsteps of past ambassadors Josh Homme, Ozzy Osbourne, Iggy Pop, and Jack White.

Last year’s Record Store Day was the largest yet in Canada, with more than 150 stores from across Canada are celebrating, with stores in all 10 provinces taking part. More information on this year’s celebration, including in-store performances and special release vinyl will be released as it becomes available.

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A Warm Breeze from Davos Thaws the Online Cold War?

It has been popular in recent years to portray the debate over how the internet functions and how its functioning could be improved as some sort of Manichaean divide: a struggle between the forces of freedom and sharing and the forces of commerce and control. The stark duality of this over-simplified, zero-sum world view has had the effect of freezing meaningful dialogue on this critical issue for our times, creating a stalemated Cold War that has prevented anything meaningful from being discussed, much less accomplished.

Into this dogmatic Cold War comes an intelligent breeze that gives hope for a thaw and with any luck a return to meaningful dialogue.

A Report was issued last week at the World Economic Forum in Davos entitled: Norms and Values in Digital Media: Rethinking Intellectual Property in the Digital Age .

In the current stalemated political environment, this is a fairly astounding document. And it should be noted that this is not a top down assessment from the Davos elite, but rather the organic genesis of genuine dialogues between stakeholders in the North and the South, the East and the West. The Report notes:

Bringing together a wide range of stakeholders in the field revealed many points of contention. Nevertheless, the discussions revealed common elements of a shared vision for the future. The purpose of these principles, therefore, is to help stakeholders with disparate interests to identify areas of agreement. Getting to policy or legislation may still be contentious, but it will be more productive if, when inevitable disagreements arise, the stakeholders are able to refer back to the principles and discuss how the disagreements fit within this framework.

 

The principles articulated in the Report are spelled out below. The music industry is singled out as follows:

“In some industries, such as the music industry, significant progress has been made to shift or create new business models to reflect new consumer behaviours – streaming music services like Spotify being one such example. It is still unclear, however, what new business models and mechanisms will emerge to support large-scale, expensive works in the future.”

What principles are to be drawn from this? They are all important, but I would highlight in particular the following:

  • Foster and reward creativity: Develop a vibrant creative community that encourages the production of diverse content and rewards creators through financial remuneration, recognition or other types of value.
  • Give creators and rights owners control and choice: Provide creators and rights owners with tools to decide and control how their work is shared and used.
  • Strengthen global collaboration: Strengthen collaboration between people and governments in different geographic areas to help ensure that these principles can be respected and implemented globally, given the transferability of digital media.

Here are the principles in full:

Principles for the Creative and Information Economy in the Digital Age

Stakeholders attempted to identify a shared set of values through dialogues in the two pilot markets, the UK and Indonesia, as well as at one workshop in the US. Workshops were held to establish common ground among diverse stakeholders in the two pilot markets. Bringing together a wide range of stakeholders in the field revealed many points of contention. Nevertheless, the discussions revealed common elements of a shared vision for the future. The purpose of these principles, therefore, is to help stakeholders with disparate interests to identify areas of agreement. Getting to policy or legislation may still be contentious, but it will be more productive if, when inevitable disagreements arise, the stakeholders are able to refer back to the principles and discuss how the disagreements fit within this framework.

 

The principles are:

  •  Foster and reward creativity: Develop a vibrant creative community that encourages the production of diverse content and rewards creators through financial remuneration, recognition or other types of value.
  • Build an ecosystem for innovation: Create an ecosystem where innovation can occur by providing a level playing field for businesses and individuals, and incentives for innovation.
  • Expand access to content: Offer a wide range of means for the public to reach content, enabled by the Internet and other technologies, maximizing societal and economic benefit.
  • Inform users about ownership rights: Ensure that information about the ownership and permitted uses of digital content is clear and accessible to all, especially as technology enables more collaborative creation.
  • Give creators and rights owners control and choice: Provide creators and rights owners with tools to decide and control how their work is shared and used.
  • Enable people to be creators: Enable people to make, share and exchange content online by providing access, skills, tools and choice.
  • Strengthen global collaboration: Strengthen collaboration between people and governments in different geographic areas to help ensure that these principles can be respected and implemented globally, given the transferability of digital media.

This should provide a constructive shared foundation on which to build meaningful dialogue, resolve disagreements and, as the Report notes, “get to policy” that makes the internet a constructive forum for us all.

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“Songs For Japan” Hits $10 Million Milestone

Today, the IFPI announced that the Songs For Japan, the 38-song compilation album created to help raise money for victims of Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami disasters, has raised over $10 Million and continues to benefit the survivors through Japanese Red Cross Society.

As per the release, senior executives from four major music companies – EMI, Sony Music, Universal Music and Warner Music Group – met yesterday in Tokyo with Yoshiharu Otsuk, Vice President of the Japanese Red Cross Society, to recognize the milestone of $10 million raised and donated from the global sales of Songs For Japan. The occasion was a reception hosted by IFPI chief executive Frances Moore.

In the release, Tadateru Konoe, President of Japanese Red Cross Society, said, “The kind thoughts of the people who made and bought this album have given great encouragement to the people affected by the earthquake and tsunami. One hundred percent of the money raised goes directly to those most in need. On behalf of the Japanese Red Cross and the people affected by the disaster, I want to sincerely thank the artists and music companies for this generous support. It is much needed and greatly appreciated.”

Songs for Japan is a music industry-wide initiative, with all the participating artists, songwriters, music labels, music publishers and iTunes waiving their royalties and proceeds to maximize the amount of money donated for survivors. Additionally, participating manufacturers, distributors and marketing partners donated materials, services and advertising time or space.

The result is an unprecedented compilation of 38 major hits and classic tracks, including 21 Billboard Hot 100 hits and five Number 1 hits from more than 30 of the biggest names in music. The collection was rush-released worldwide on March 25 – only 14 days after the earthquake struck Japan – as a digital album via iTunes, followed by the release of a physical two-CD set.

Worldwide, music fans have purchased more than 1 Million digital and physical copies of Songs for Japan since it’s release. The album reached #1 on iTunes in 18 countries worldwide the week after release.

To purchase the album and help with the continuing relief efforts, download the album for just $9.99 on iTunes.

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Economic Consequences of Movie Piracy – Canada

February, 2011 – A joint study undertaken by Ipsos and Oxford Economics, on behalf of the Canadian Motion Picture Distributors Association (CMPDA), measures the scale of harm caused by movie piracy on Canadian jobs and the economy.
Economic Consequences of Movie Piracy – Canada
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