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Jonas Brothers receive Platinum plaques in Toronto

Photo Credit: Jonas Brothers / Universal Music Canada

2019 was an epic year for American pop sensations Jonas Brothers, who returned to the spotlight following the release of their fifth studio album Happiness Begins and their first major arena tour in a decade. The band played three shows at Toronto’s Scotiabank Arena over the course of the tour, along with a stop at Montreal’s Bell Centre on Wednesday night. Prior to Tuesday’s show in Toronto, Nick, Kevin, and Joe were surprised with their own Platinum award plaques for Happiness Begins by Universal Music Canada, sharing the news across their social media accounts with their Canadian fans.

Happiness Begins was the brothers’ first Canadian album certification since August 2009, when A Little Bit Longer (2008) received its Double Platinum certification and Lines, Vines and Trying Times (2009) was certified Platinum. Happiness Begins also features the certified hits “Sucker” (4x Platinum), “Only Human” (Platinum), and “Cool” (Platinum), which are included on the custom award plaque.

Watch the music video for “Sucker” below.

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Music Canada proud to serve as partner for APTN’s landmark National Indigenous Music Impact Study

On November 13th, 2019, APTN published the first-ever National Indigenous Music Impact Study. This landmark report demonstrates the contributions made by the Indigenous music community to the wider music industry, as well as to the overall Canadian economy. 

“We set out to gain a better understanding of this group of professionals, and what we found is that this industry has a significant impact on the economic and social fabric of Canada,” said Jean La Rose, CEO of APTN, in the news release. “However, the industry also faces challenges, which creates many opportunities for growth. We see this study as a starting point for in-depth and informed discussions that will help the industry reach its full potential.”

“Music Canada was proud to partner with APTN on this study, which highlights the important impact Indigenous artists have on the music ecosystem,” said Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “As the first comprehensive study of the Indigenous music industry in Canada to date, this report is contributing to a better understanding of the Indigenous music community’s impact from an economic, social, and cultural perspective.”

The study surveyed 620 respondents from the Indigenous music community in Canada and produced key findings, including the following:

  • Indigenous music contributed a total of almost $78 million to Canada’s economy (GDP) in 2018. 
  • Indigenous music also supports more than 3,000 full time positions across Canada.
  • Annually, Indigenous musicians (including both full time and part-time artists) earn an average of $47,200 from all sources. However – like many other musicians – almost half of income earned by Indigenous artists is derived from non-music work. 
  • Companies in the Indigenous music community reported that almost half (47%) of their activities last year were related to developing Indigenous music. These activities incurred $17.5 million in expenditures directly related to music by Indigenous artists.

Notably, the study found that there is no agreed-upon definition of Indigenous music. It cannot be constrained into a single genre, as the Indigenous music community today is characterized by an immense diversity of styles and experiences.

The report concludes that the Indigenous music community is vibrant and thriving. However, the Indigenous music industry (made up of Indigenous-owned, Indigenous-directed music companies and supporting organizations) is still early in its development process – and is in need of support to achieve robust growth.

To read the full National Indigenous Music Impact Study, download the report from APTN’s website.

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Jason Mraz presented with Gold Single plaque in Toronto

Photo Credit: Warner Music Canada

Multi-Platinum singer-songwriter Jason Mraz returned to Toronto Tuesday night for the first of two intimate shows at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre alongside indie-folk quintet Raining Jane. Ahead of the performance, Warner Music Canada surprised Mraz with a Gold plaque for single “Have It All” from his 2018 album Know., which is his first Canadian certification since 2014’s Gold album YES!. 

During this Fall 2019 run of “Evening with” shows, Mraz also visited Edmonton, Calgary, and Vancouver.

Watch the music video for “Have It All” below.

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Music Canada Congratulates Ontario Chamber of Commerce OBAA 2019 Winners

November 15, 2019, Toronto: Music Canada was honoured to attend the 2019 Ontario Chamber of Commerce gala as a finalist for the Ontario Business Achievement Award (OBAA) for Diversity and Inclusion. This award recognizes business excellence in supporting the creation of diverse and inclusive workplaces.

“Music Canada is honoured to receive recognition as a finalist for the Diversity and Inclusion award from the Ontario Chamber of Commerce,” said Graham Henderson, Music Canada President and CEO. “As a leading voice in the music industry, we believe it’s important to take concrete actions to show our commitment to the principles that define us, and those principles include diversity and inclusivity. We also want to recognize the exceptional work of the award winner Danby Appliances, and all of the incredible OBAA nominees who are each helping to move the needle forward and enrich each of our workplaces, businesses and communities.”

Music Canada brings together the voices of its major record label members, Universal, Sony and Warner, to build a healthier and more robust music ecosystem throughout Canada. A thought-leader within the music ecosystem, Music Canada has taken concrete actions aimed at improving diversity and inclusivity within its governance and initiatives. 

Recent accomplishments by Music Canada include amending its bylaws to allow for two additional seats on its Board, which were filled by independent directors. A Board Diversity Policy was also instituted, which aims for Board composition of at least 40% women. And in 2019, Music Canada created an Advisory Council, comprised of 15 exceptional and passionate individuals from a diverse cross-section of music industry stakeholders with a variety of skills and experience. The Council and Music Canada’s consulting artist advocates continue to provide candid perspectives and insights which shape the organization and its activities. 

In addition, Music Canada seeks opportunities to work with other organizations to promote inclusivity in the music ecosystem. As a partner in the “Allies in Action” event at the 2019 JUNOS Awards, Music Canada showcased initiatives and programs within the music industry that make positive change in relation to diversity, inclusion and safe workplaces.

“Canada is home to some of the best music in the world. It’s truly a privilege that we get to advocate on behalf of the musicians and businesses who create that great music,” said Henderson. “And we believe that it is important that the diversity of the music ecosystem is reflected in our organization and our initiatives. That belief, together with the support of our innovative members, Universal, Sony and Warner, and the efforts of our exceptional staff, is the heart of our success.”

“This recognition is incredibly meaningful, but our work is not done,” said Jackie Dean, Music Canada Chief Operating Officer. “We will continue to advocate for greater representation on boards of directors in our industry and to create opportunities for artists, including those from underrepresented groups, to speak to their experiences.”

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Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Music Canada announces new Strategic Initiatives portfolio to support every stage of the Canadian commercial music ecosystem

Music Canada is pleased to announce the creation of a new business unit known as Strategic Initiatives. This new division includes a portfolio of initiatives that are designed to better support the music ecosystem. The move follows a strategic restructuring of our organization designed to increase the positive and measurable impact that Music Canada can have on the entire Canadian music industry. These changes are part of Music Canada’s commitment to be an agent of change with respect to business and social issues impacting the music community today. 

In recent months, Music Canada discontinued operations of its affiliate non-profit Music Canada Cares and transitioned Sarah Hashem, the organization’s former Managing Director, to establish and lead the Strategic Initiatives portfolio at Music Canada. 

Through its Three R’s Music Program, Music Canada Cares improved equitable access to quality music education.The program improved the inventory of musical instruments and access to quality music education in Ontario’s publicly funded schools with the supply of refurbished and recycled music instruments. 

A total of 3,120 instruments were collected at Music Canada Cares community drives across the province. The donated instruments were then refurbished and repaired, and distributed to Ontario’s publicly funded schools, prioritizing underserved communities, particularly at-risk, Indigenous and other underrepresented communities. 

A total of 166 schools received refurbished instruments, or grants to repair their existing instrument inventory to fully functioning condition. Many of the repairs were conducted at local repair shops, driving economic activity within the local community. Through these community drives and local repairs, the program helped strengthen connections between the school music programs and their broader community, and helped strengthen public support for music education. 

“While Music Canada Cares was successful in delivering exceptional results to students across Ontario’s public schools, we believe our greatest opportunity is to integrate our industry leadership role within the Music Canada daily operations and shift our focus from service delivery to long-term structural improvements to music education and other key issues,” says Graham Henderson, Music Canada’s President and CEO. 

“We have developed a comprehensive strategy to support the Canadian music ecosystem at every stage,” says Sarah Hashem, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at Music Canada. “Our initiatives will be classified in relation to 4 key pillars: Create, Develop, Elevate and Celebrate.” 

Under the Create banner, Music Canada continues our commitment to music education with the  sponsorship of a national music education study. The study, which is being led by the Coalition for Music Education, in partnership with Music Canada, the Canadian Music Educators’ Association, MusiCounts / CARAS, People for Education, and the Canadian Network for Arts and Learning, is projected to be released in summer 2020. The study will provide a picture of the state of music education across Canada, and help us determine our future projects in this area. 

Our Develop pillar includes Music Canada’s dedicated initiative to artist-entrepreneurs, which will enable artists’ business success. This initiative includes a partnership with CONNECT Music Licensing to study artists’ business needs, which will help guide the development of our programs. 

Our world-renowned Music Cities strategy work will continue under our Elevate pillar. Music Canada has been a global leader in Music Cities research and advocacy for nearly a decade. Our work in this area will move forward with an inclusion lens, and through work with partners like the Canadian Chambers of Commerce. 

The Celebrate pillar includes our Gold/Platinum certification program, which celebrates milestone sales of music in Canada.  With over 20,000 albums, singles, digital downloads, ringtones, and music videos certified since its launch in 1975, the Music Canada’s Gold/Platinum program provides a unique historical timeline of popular music in Canada. This pillar also captures the other ways Music Canada celebrates music’s contributions to Canada’s cultural identity, such as through partnerships with organizations such as the JUNO Awards and the Canadian Music Hall of Fame.

By integrating strategic initiatives in its core operations, Music Canada is creating a structure that enables it to achieve long-lasting and sustainable benefits that apply to the entire music community. 

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The Dead South receive first Gold plaque in Toronto

The Dead South (L-R: Danny Kenyon, Scott Pringle, Nate Hilts, Colton Crawford ) with Six Shooter Records staff (L-R: Morgan Coates, Helen Britton, Chris Wynters, Shauna de Cartier, Matthew Maw, Emily Smart) 

Amidst a North American tour in support of their latest album Sugar & Joy, Saskatchewan’s The Dead South stopped in Toronto a few days before their highly anticipated Halloween show at The Phoenix Concert Theatre. During a private event last Wednesday, Six Shooter Records presented the Regina-based band with their first Canadian Gold Single Award plaques for 2014 hit “In Hell I’ll Be In Good Company” which was officially certified earlier this year.

Watch the music video for “In Hell I’ll Be In Good Company” below.

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Music Canada Amplifies the Music Ecosystem at 2019 Symposium

On October 23, Music Canada held its annual Symposium event, highlighting the past year of work to create the conditions for a strong and dynamic music economy in Canada. The event brought together industry champions, thought leaders, artists and advocates to share milestones and to provide a look toward the future. The format of the event aligned with Music Canada’s Strategic Plan, a formal roadmap designed to achieve our goal of creating a marketplace in Canada where artists and the businesses who support them are fairly paid when their work is commercialized. 

This year’s theme, Amplifying the Music Ecosystem, set the stage to deliver the results of Music Canada’s advocacy work over the past year.  CEO and President Graham Henderson opened the event by sharing the impact of the organization’s recent report Closing the Value Gap, launched to a sold-out crowd at the Economic Club of Canada this summer. Henderson outlined how policymakers have come to recognize the existence of the Value Gap and the legislative changes that are needed to fix it. He reaffirmed Music Canada’s commitment, in light of the recent federal election, to working with the government to ensure necessary reforms are considered to address the Value Gap, and to uplift artists and creators.

Henderson welcomed Farah Mohamed as an Independent Director to Music Canada’s Board. An experienced social profit entrepreneur, Mohamed also serves as the Senior Vice President to the Toronto Region Board of Trade, and has held prior roles as the CEO of the Malala Fund and founder of G(irls)20. Along with Jennifer Sloan, who was elected Chair of the Board earlier this year, these additions complement the Board with their incredible experience and insight. 

“Music Canada has an important role to play in representing an industry that plays a part in most, if not all, of Canadian’s lives,” said Farah Mohamed.“As an independent Director to Music Canada’s Board, I look forward to supporting their mandate as an agent of change and a thought leader within the music community. I’m excited to be able to work to engage all players across the music industry, from the private sector to government leaders, so that artists from coast to coast to coast and the industry is strong and vibrant for decades to come.” 

NYU Professor Larry S. Miller, Director of the Music Business Program, and host of the popular Musonomics podcast, delivered a keynote address that shared new and compelling information from his recent report Same Heart. New Beat. How Record Labels Amplify Talent in the Modern Music Marketplace, which illustrates how record labels have reinvented themselves to thrive in the era of streaming music. Miller took part in a fireside chat with Graham Henderson and Miranda Mulholland, musician, label owner, music festival founder, and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. Together, they illustrated how the changing relationship with technology impacts the future sustainability of the industry.

The Symposium included a rousing performance by multi-instrumentalist country singer Emily Reid. Raised in Victoria, B.C., Reid moved to Nashville to study at the prestigious Belmont University, where she immersed herself in Nashville’s Music City culture. Reid signed with Universal Music Canada in 2018, releasing her major label debut EP, Wine, this past summer. She is currently on tour opening for Kip Moore on her home turf in British Columbia, opening shows in Duncan, Victoria, and Nanaimo. 

A fireside chat with Music Canada Chief Operating Officer Jackie Dean, board members Jennifer Sloan and Farah Mohamed, and Susan Marjetti, award-winning journalist and Executive Director of CBC Radio and Audio continued the conversation on the importance of diversity and inclusivity measures across the industry.

Despite distinct backgrounds and experiences, each panelist talked about the power of music to unite people in order to tackle social causes, to overcome challenges, and to promote what makes Canada special at home and abroad.

Graham Henderson presented Gil Moore with this year’s Artist Advocate Award, which recognizes musicians and songwriters for their outstanding advocacy efforts to improve the livelihoods of music creators. 

“I’m very proud to receive this award today,” said Gil Moore. “But awards are not the reason I became an artist advocate – I am an advocate for music because I have seen firsthand how it can change lives. I’ve seen that in my own career as a performer, I’ve seen it with fans who are so passionate about the artists they love, and I’ve seen it with our students at Metalworks, who get into this business and invest in their careers because they love music and they are driven to succeed in this industry. I’ve also seen the way that music can empower a community, create jobs, and drive economic growth – and that is worth advocating for. Thank you to Graham and Music Canada for this recognition, and your continued efforts to grow the music sector.” 

“Gil Moore has put Mississauga’s music scene on the map. We are eternally grateful for his efforts and pride he has brought to our City,” said Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “Gil consistently champions the power of music for job creation and growth, and as a member of our Economic Development Advisory Board, he has been instrumental in the creation of the first full-time music industry position at City Hall focused on music sector development.”

Henderson also presented the President’s Award to Susan Marjetti to celebrate her work to support the industry and her deep passion for music that has had an enduring impact on the music ecosystem. “I’m deeply touched by this recognition. Like all of you, music has been such a big part of my life,” said Susan Marjetti. “Music has the power to connect us. To reflect us. To engage and entertain us. It matters deeply. And Canada just wouldn’t be the same without our music and the people who make it. At CBC Music, we aspire to celebrate and honour that every day.”

In a particularly poignant moment, Graham Henderson, Warner Music President Steve Kane, and Universal Music President Jeffrey Remedios held a moving tribute to the late Deane Cameron, former President of EMI Music Canada and a true changemaker who had an indelible effect on our industry. Together, they announced that Music Canada, with the support of our member labels, has created a new MusiCounts scholarship in Cameron’s honour. Reflecting Deane’s long standing support for Indigenous communities and programs, $15,000 has been pledged to ensure that two to three Indigenous youth will receive a MusiCounts Scholarship in 2020. Shane Carter, President of Sony Music Canada, would also have been part of the announcement, but was travelling and unable to attend.

“We are here to treasure the memory of our absent friend, Deane Cameron,” said Henderson, after quoting Cicero and Thoreau. Both Kane and Remedios spoke passionately about Cameron’s passion for Canadian artists, and of his influence and mentorship on their own careers.

“I can’t think of a better way to honour our friend,” said Kane. “After Deane’s passing, there were a lot of fantastic stories about how he supported and inspired Canadian artists. Equally important was his role in inspiring and in nurturing business and executive talent. And I can say as I look over my shoulder, Jeffrey and I are living, breathing examples of that tutelage and that generosity. This scholarship embodies Deane’s generosity. He was generous with his time, with his wisdom. He challenged us, he taught us. And every day, we try to live up to the bar and example that he set for us.” 

“He brought so many of us up in this business. Leading and guiding, but also nurturing us. Deane was my mentor and he was my biggest champion,” said Remedios. 

“He taught me about making great records, and about breaking acts. He taught me about how to speak hard truths to artists – with respect, and compassion, and with care. I miss him, but he’s never far from my thoughts. I try to live up to the lessons and values that he instilled in me and so many others every day.”

Following the tribute, Miranda Mulholland performed “Ashokan Farewell” on violin in Cameron’s memory, providing a beautiful soundtrack to a moment of reflection.

Jennifer Sloan, Chair of the Music Canada Board of Directors, closed the event with a message on the importance of an industry united, and how collaboration is integral to continue to ensure that the wide range of voices can be amplified, as we strive to continue strengthening the music ecosystem.

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For more information, please contact:

Erica Meekes
Director of Public Relations and Events
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

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Music Canada Advisory Council Members Set An Example for Industry Leadership and Collaboration

Gathering insights and perspectives from across the music community is a crucial part of Music Canada’s mission of inspiring Canadians to truly appreciate the power and value of music. To further our ability to act as an agent of change and thought leader in the music community, Music Canada has created an Advisory Council. Announced in March 2019, and reporting directly to the President & CEO, the Advisory Council is comprised of 14 exceptional and passionate individuals representing various constituencies in the music industry. The group is a cross section of leaders reflecting diversity in thoughts, gender and ethnicity among many other attributes.

On September 12th, the Music Canada Advisory Council held their third meeting in Toronto. Chaired by artist, record label owner, and music festival founder Miranda Mulholland, the meeting was designed to facilitate dialogue around issues impacting the music sector today, and to exchange ideas on potential solutions. Topics discussed included the important role of artist advocacy and the value of working with all political parties to advance policies that support Canadian creators.

Music Canada’s Sarah Hashem led the Advisory Council into a strategic positioning exercise to help map out the music ecosystem. The exercise highlighted difference of opinions in defining the parameters of the music industry and its far-reaching influence into other sectors ranging from technology to education. Council members committed to building an illustration reflecting their shared views of the music ecosystem. The work will continue in subsequent meetings.

“While the council’s work has just begun, we are already seeing the great value in industry leadership and collaboration,” says Miranda Mulholland. “The council creates opportunities for the exchange of ideas – not only between council members and Music Canada and vice versa – it also creates opportunities for council members to speak directly to each other, creating valuable discourse as we work together towards the common goal of strengthening the Canadian music ecosystem.”

Music Canada’s Chief Operating Officer Jackie Dean advised that Music Canada has contracted experts to build a skills matrix and perform a gap analysis for the Advisory Council. Jackie has been leading an industry wide Equity, Diversity and Inclusion initiative, a commitment that has earned Music Canada recognition at the Ontario Business Achievement Awards this year. The skills matrix will be used to identify skills needed on the council when appointing new members and will ensure that the composition of the Council continues to reflect the music community’s diversity in order to reflect the Canadian Music Industry at large.. 

“The insights shared by the Advisory Council in this meeting underscored the incredible value of hearing from diverse perspectives from across the music sector,” said Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “The council members are helping us develop a more thorough picture of the music ecosystem and providing us continuous feedback on our strategic initiatives activities.” 

The next meeting of the Advisory Council will take place in December 2019.

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Music Canada and Member Labels Announce MusiCounts Scholarship in honour of Deane Cameron

Earlier this year, the music industry lost Deane Cameron, former President of EMI Music Canada and a true changemaker who had an indelible effect on our industry. In memory of Deane, Music Canada, with the support of our member labels Warner, Sony, and Universal, is proud to announce a new MusiCounts scholarship in his honour. 

The scholarship will give aspiring professionals the connections, skills, and resources needed to jump start their career in music. The Scholarship is intended for young professionals who are completing post-secondary studies in the areas of music performance, music business, or music production, and who plan to enter the workforce within the next 12 months. 

The announcement was made today at Music Canada’s 2019 Symposium, by Steve Kane, President of Warner Music Canada, and Jeffrey Remedios, President of Universal Music Canada. Shane Carter, President of Sony Music Canada, would also have been part of the announcement, but was unable to attend due to travel. 

Reflecting Deane’s long standing support for Indigenous communities and programs, $15,000 has been pledged to the MusiCounts Scholarship Program, which will ensure that two to three Indigenous youth will receive a MusiCounts Scholarship in 2020. MusiCounts’ new partnership with Indspire will allow MusiCounts to identify Indigenous youth in Canada who will benefit most from this unique scholarship program. 

“Deane Cameron was a titan of our industry – a passionate and proud supporter of Canadian music, a staunch advocate for creators, and an inspirational leader,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “He was a mentor for so many in the music business, and an esteemed member of our board for 24 years. Through the support of our members – Sony, Universal, and Warner – we honour his enduring legacy though this scholarship.”

For full details on MusiCounts’ Scholarship programs, visit https://musicounts.ca/programs-overview/scholarships/.

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Susan Marjetti recognized with Music Canada’s President’s Award

Music Canada is proud to present Susan Marjetti, Executive Director of CBC Radio and Audio, with the Music Canada President’s Award. This award is given to an individual outside the confines of the recorded music label community who has exhibited a deep passion for music, and who has had an enduring impact on the wider industry.

Marjetti’s role at CBC includes oversight of CBC Music, CBC Talk, CBC Podcasts, and most recently, the new CBC Listen, which is a consolidated digital audio offering that includes all of CBC’s audio content from music playlists to podcasts. All of these platforms are doing incredible work to amplify the talent of great Canadian artists.

She has spent nearly four decades working in radio stations, from small to complex organizations, in various parts of Canada. Prior to taking over the reins at the network, Susan managed CBC Toronto and the Ontario region where she, and her team, worked to make the public broadcaster more relevant to these fast-paced cities, and an ever-changing province.

“I’m deeply touched by this recognition. Like all of you, music has been such a big part of my life,” says Susan Marjetti. “Music has the power to connect us. To reflect us. To engage and entertain us. It matters deeply. And Canada just wouldn’t be the same without our music and the people who make it. At CBC Music, we aspire to celebrate and honour that every day.”

Susan’s leadership in diversity and inclusion has also been recognized numerous times, including recognition with a Harry Jerome Award, Ryerson’s Wall of Fame, and the Rosalie Award.

The award was presented today at Music Canada’s 2019 Symposium. Marjetti is the fourth recipient of the Music Canada’s President’s Award; previous recipients include Mark Garner, Cory Crossman and Chris Campbell, and Josh Colle.

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