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Bob Ezrin: “Please don’t let this be the day the music died”

Esteemed Canadian music producer Bob Ezrin has published the following op-ed on the Copyright Board of Canada’s Tariff 8 decision in this week’s edition of The Hill Times.

REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM THE HILL TIMES, SEPT. 22, 2014

Please don’t let this be the day the music died

By BOB EZRIN
Published: Monday, 09/22/2014 12:00 am EDT

TORONTOIt’s always been a mixed blessing to live next to the economic and cultural behemoth to our south. On one hand, we have access to the world’s largest market, while still enjoying the more liberal and enlightened Canadian life. On the other hand, they can easily overwhelm us with sheer bulk and easy access to our market.

One of Canada’s most valuable resources—and most profitable exports—is our culture. Per capita, we may be the world’s largest exporter of culture and talent. This has been made possible by the wise decisions of our hard-working parents and by forward-thinking government policy to support the arts in schools and in the marketplace and to provide developmental resources to Canada’s creative class.

We’ve grown successive generations of creators who are the equal to any of their global counterparts. And we have a vibrant national cultural industry.

Historically we’ve ensured that our creators are not just “sponsored” as they grow, but able to earn a sustainable livelihood. But now we face a major sea of change in the marketplace that begins with Canadian music and will ultimately swamp Canadian television, film, and even literature.

It is clear that in the future most music will be consumed through digital streaming services, offering low-cost “all you can eat” subscription plans in place of selling “à la carte” songs or albums. This will become true for television and film as well.

Streaming services want rights holders to believe that, with universal penetration, we will earn much more than we used to collect selling our creations. The reality is quite different. Historically, huge global hit songs would generate millions and fund the industry’s investment in tomorrow’s hit-makers—our R&D.  Today, in the streaming model, the return is a fraction of that.

And in Canada, we are beginning to set rates that are dramatically less than that.

Today, a massive hit streamed 100,000,000 times on  “non- or semi-interactive” services in most developed countries earns performers and their record labels between $130,000 and $220,000. Under the tariff set by our Copyright Board earlier this year, 100,000,000 listens in Canada—a near impossibility given our size—would generate a whopping $10,200. That is less than 10 per cent of what is paid in most other major markets—and roughly 10 per cent of what our industry had already negotiated in direct deals with the streaming services here! And the amount paid to Canadian songwriters and publishers is a similar pittance.

I know that the board operates with the best of intentions, but I am afraid in the case of Tariff 8 it has miscalculated what this industry needs, and Canadian music creators will suffer the consequences.

In short, if the Copyright Board’s inadvertent devaluation of our music is widely adopted and spreads to other rights, we’re dead. Our homegrown Canadian music industry cannot survive this. We will shrivel and die. And when we shrink, it will affect all the workers who support us, from graphic artists to marketing people to truck drivers to hotel workers to stagehands and software engineers—because many of us will simply no longer be able to afford to be creators and marketers of music, or to put our shows on the road.

Perhaps the worst result of the low rate is that we will be granting a 90 per cent discount to American streaming companies that covet our market and will eagerly sweep in here with powerful and well-funded systems that will wipe out any Canadian-owned competition—all at the expense of the creators Canada has historically supported with thoughtful policy.

My message to our government and the Copyright Board is simple:  Please pay attention to the marketplace, because that’s where we make our living. And please recognize that if our digital marketplace is to flourish, it will depend on the health and sustainability of our creative industries, which provide the content that fuel the digital marketplace. Please reconsider Tariff 8. And let’s sit down together to find a way to protect this most valuable of Canadian resources—our culture—in the new economy.

Please don’t let this be the day the music died.

Bob Ezrin has produced some of the world’s most important music artists, including Pink Floyd, Alice Cooper, Peter Gabriel, Johnny Reid and Young Artists for Haiti. He was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 2004 and Canada’s Walk of Fame in 2013. In 2013, he was also named an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Conservatory of Music. Bob can be reached at:  bobezrin@nimbusarts.ca.

 

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4th Edition Of “It’s Your Shot” Songwriting & Artist Development Competition Kicking Off Sept. 1

On September 1st, Slaight Music and Warner Music Canada will kickoff It’s Your Shot 4 Canadian songwriting and artist development competition. The contest, which is open to all musical genres, encourages artists to submit a song and/or video to www.itsyourshot.ca for a chance to win a Grand Prize valued at $50,000.

Each year, Slaight Music – a company focused on discovering, developing, inspiring and supporting Canadian recording artists – partners with one of Canada’s major record labels to support this initiative.  The winning artist this year will receive distribution, radio promotion, publicity, and marketing support via Warner Music Canada, along with a professional photo session, a professionally written biography, the development of an artist website, social network pages and an opportunity to perform at a high-profile musical event in 2015.

Derrick Ross, President of Slaight Music comments, “Every year the It’s Your Shot competition highlights the fact that Canada produces many of the most creative and talented musicians in the world.  Winning this competition is a giant step towards a successful musical career for any emerging artist and we can’t wait to hear what the entrants to It’s Your Shot 4 bring this year!”

Past winners of the competition include: Liz Coyles (2011) who had a Top 20 hit with her debut single “Butterflies”; Hamilton’s Thought Beneath Film (2012), currently writing their sophomore album; and 20 year-old Jill Godin (2013), from Saint John, NB, who is currently in the studio adding the finishing touches to  her debut single and EP  that are due for release via Universal Music Canada in early 2015.  “Most other music contests offer money, but with It’s Your Shot, the money goes toward real artist development and comes with a team dedicated to launching a career”, Jill says.

The contest will run from September 1st to October 31st with the winning submission announced on December 15th.

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MEDIA ADVISORY: Six music cities to share best practices for music development at Music Cities Exchange during NXNE

Toronto, June 12, 2014: Representatives from six cities who have taken a pro-active approach to developing their music scenes will take part in a Music Cities Exchange during NXNE on Friday, June 20, 2014. Panelists from Toronto, Austin, Hamilton, London, Chicago, Kitchener, and Montreal have been invited to participate in a moderated forum where panelists discuss the steps their city has taken to leverage their respective music scenes and grow opportunities for music development.

The Music Cities Exchange will share best practices, discuss challenges and opportunities facing their respective music communities, and explore the relationship between music and tourism agencies, municipal governments and other sectors.

When: Friday, June 20 @ 2:30 – 4 pm

Where: The Portland Room, The Spoke Club, 600 King St W, Toronto

To arrange interviews with panelists, please contact Quentin Burgess at qburgess@musiccanada.com or 647-981-8410.

This event is proudly sponsored by NXNE, 4479, and Music Canada.

– 30 –

For more information:

Music Canada Media Contact: Quentin Burgess, 647.981.8410, qburgess@musiccanada.com

NXNE Media Contact: FLIP PUBLICITY Damien Nelson, 416.533.7710 X221, damien@flip-publicity.com

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The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage – Review of the Canadian Music Industry

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage has undertaken a Review of the Canadian Music Industry, following an approved motion at the Committee on December 5, 2013, where “it was agreed, — That, pursuant to S.O. 108(2) the Committee undertake a review of the Canadian music industry… in order to:

a) inform Committee members of the details and impacts of the government support on Canadian music, as well as the creators and entrepreneurs who create and distribute music in Canada;

b) determine how funding is allocated;

c) to establish whether the government support is meeting the objectives laid out for it, and to make recommendations to the government on how it might strengthen support for Canadian music, and report its findings to the House.”

 

 

Music Canada is looking forward for an opportunity to address the committee on themes as explored in The Next Big Bang, A New Direction for Music in Canada.

For reference, links to witness appearances and transcripts are below, and we will update this page following future appearances.

Past Meetings:

March 4, 2014:
Witnesses:
Department of Canadian Heritage: Jean-François Bernier, Director General, Cultural Industries; Sophie Couture, Director, Music Policy and Programs.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

March 25, 2014:
Witnesses:
Society for Reproduction Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers in Canada
: Alain Lauzon, General Manager.
Connect Music Licensing: Victoria Shepherd, Executive Director.
Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists: Brad Keenan, Director, Recording Artists’ Collecting Society; David Faber, Canadian Musician, Faber Drive .
Association québécoise de l’industrie du disque, du spectacle et de la vidéo (ADISQ) : Solange Drouin, Vice-President of Public Affairs and Executive Director.
Canadian Independent Music Association: Stuart Johnston, President; Shauna de Cartier, Chair.
Music BC Industry Association: Robert D’Eith, Executive Director.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

March 27, 2014:
Witnesses:
Canadian Music Publishers Association: Elisabeth Bihl, Executive Director; Jodie Ferneyhough, President.
Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada: Gilles Daigle, General Counsel and Head of Legal Services.
Professional Music Publishers’ Association: David Murphy, President.
Library and Archives of Canada: Hervé Déry, Acting Librarian and Archivist of Canada, Office of the Librarian and Archivist of Canada; Cecilia Muir, Chief Operating Officer, Office of the Chief Operating Officer.
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission: Scott Hutton, Executive Director, Broadcasting; Annie Laflamme, Director, Radio Policy and Applications.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio Streams

April 1, 2014
Witnesses:
Alliance nationale de l’industrie musicale
: Natalie Bernardin, President; Benoit Henry, Chief Executive Officer.
Songwriters Association of Canada: Greg Johnston, Vice-President; Jean-Robert Bisaillon, Vice-President.
Gospel Music Association of Canada: Martin Smith, President.
Volu.me: Shawn Cooper, President and Co-Founder.
SiriusXM Canada: Andréanne Sasseville, Director, Canadian Content Development and Industry Relations; Paul Cunningham, Vice-President.
Songza: Vanessa Thomas, Managing Director, Canada.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

April 8, 2014
Witnesses:

Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences:
Allan Reid, Director, MusiCounts
As individuals: Brett Kissel; Louis O’Reilly, Manager, O’Reilly International Inc.
Re:Sound Music Licensing Company: Ian MacKay, President
Avalanche Productions and Sound Publishing: Sébastien Nasra, President-Founder, M for Montreal – Mundial Montreal
Artisti and Union des artistes: Richard Petit; Annie Morin, Director
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

April 10, 2014
Witnesses:
Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec: Pierre-Daniel Rheault, Chief Executive Officer
Canadian Federation of Musicians: Mark Tetreault, Director of Symphonic Services
Guilde des musiciens et musiciennes du Québec: Luc Fortin, President
North by Northeast (NXNE): Mike Tanner, Director of Operations
Live Nation Canada: Riley O’Connor, Chairman; Ken Craig, Promoter
Ticketmaster Canada: Patti-Anne Tarlton, Chief Operating Officer
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

April 29, 2014
Witnesses:
Cerberus Management and Consulting: Brian Hetherman, President
Quebecor Media Inc.: J. Serge Sasseville, Vice-President, Corporate and Institutional Affairs; Christian Breton, Vice-President, Music sector, Groupe Archambault
Polaris Music Prize: Steve Jordan, Founder and Executive Director
RBC Ottawa Bluesfest: Mark Monahan, Executive Director
Canadian Tourism Commission: Greg Klassen, President and Chief Executive Officer
Tourism Industry Association of Canada: David F. Goldstein, President and Chief Executive Officer
Minutes
Transcript
Audio stream

May 1, 2014
Witnesses:
Institut de la statistique du Québec:
Dominique Jutras, Director, Observatoire de la culture et des communications; Claude Fortier, Project Manager, Observatoire de la culture et des communications
Warner Music Canada:
Steven Kane, President
Nettwerk Music Group:
Simon Mortimer-Lamb, President and Chief Operating Officer
L’Équipe Spectra:
François Bissoondoyal, Director, Label; Roseline Rico, Vice-President, Governmental Affairs
Coup de coeur francophone:
Alain Chartrand, Executive and Artistic Director
Lula Lounge:
Jose Ortega, Co-Artistic Director, Lula Music and Arts Centre; Tracy Jenkins, Executive and Co-Artistic Director, Lula Music and Arts Centre
Notice of meeting
Transcript
Audio stream

May 6, 2014
Witnesses:
Canadian Independent Recording Artists’ Association: Zachary Leighton, Executive Director; Gregg Terrence, President
National Music Centre:
Andrew Mosker, President and Chief Executive Officer
Stingray Digital:
Eric Albert, Executive Vice-President; Mathieu Peloquin, Senior Vice-President Marketing and Communications
Google Canada:
Jason Kee, Counsel, Public Policy and Government Relations
Deezer:
Justin Erdman, Managing Director, Canada
Notice of meeting
Audio stream

May 8, 2014
Witnesses:
Quinlan Road Limited:
Loreena McKennitt, President; As individuals, Jim Vallance, Paul Hoffert
Mo’fat Management:
Stéphanie Moffatt, President; Mylène Fortier, Director, Marketing
Music NB
: Jean Surette, Executive Director; Richard Hornsby, Director of Music, University of New Brunswick
Manitoba Music:
Stephen Carroll, Board Member
Notice of meeting

Audio stream


May 13, 2014

Witnesses:
Foundation Assisting Canadian Talent on Recordings (FACTOR):
Susan Wheeler, Chair; Duncan McKie, President; Allison Outhit, Vice-President, Operation
Fondation Musicaction: Pierre Rodrigue, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Louise Chenail, Chief Executive Officer
Fonds RadioStar: François Bissoondoyal, Chairman of the Board of Directors; Louise Chenail, Chief Executive Officer
Music Canada: Graham Henderson, President
Radio Starmaker Fund: Sylvie Courtemanche, Chair of the Board; Chip Sutherland, Executive Director; Alan Doyle, Member of the Board
Canadian Music Week: Neill Dixon, President
Notice of meeting
Video stream

May 15, 2014

Drafting Instructions for a Report
Notice of meeting
Video stream

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A Tribe Called Red & Lisa LeBlanc deliver incredible performances at Minister of Canadian Heritage Shelly Glover’s Canadian Music Night

A Tribe Called Red & Lisa LeBlanc delivered incredible performances this week at Minister of Canadian Heritage Shelly Glover’s Canadian Music Night, an event series celebrating Canadian music and its contribution to Canada’s economy. The event, organized by Music Canada and Quebecor, with the support of TD Bank, Stingray Digital Group, CIMA, and ADISQ, was held at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, and was well attended by a non-partisan crowd including Members of Parliament from various parties, Senators, members of the media, and representatives from Canada’s music industry.

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Photo: Lisa Leblanc performs at the National Arts Centre

Photo by John Major Photography

ATCR1
Photo: A Tribe Called Red perform at the National Arts Centre

Photo by John Major Photography

The Minister’s Music Night series is an opportunity to expose Members of Parliament to some of Canada’s top musical talents, and the fifth iteration of the event highlighted Canada’s diverse and eclectic music styles. This was the first time the event featured Aboriginal and Acadian artists, with the distinct mix of A Tribe Called Red’s blend of traditional pow wow vocals and drumming with cutting-edge electronic music, and Lisa LeBlanc’s unique style of francophone Acadian ‘folk-trash’ songs. In an interview with QMI, Lisa LeBlanc said it was a great opportunity to share the stage with A Tribe Called Red, “which doesn’t happen often, because we have such different music styles.”

This was the second Canadian Music Night hosted by Minister Glover, following an event held at Museum of Civilization (History) in Gatineau, QC last December, which featured performances by Kaïn & Brett Kissel. After the event, Minister Glover highlighted the vitality of Canada’s music industry, noting the cultural and economic importance of the sector.

“I was thrilled to once again host the popular Music Night and showcase some of Canada’s best and brightest stars in the music industry. This unforgettable evening left me with a deeper sense of pride in our country’s dynamic, brilliant musicians and artists,” said Minister Glover. “Our guest artists, folk-rock singer-songwriter Lisa Leblanc and electronic music group A Tribe Called Red, have made waves and enriched the lives of many, both at home and abroad, with their unique styles.”

 

Prior to the show, A Tribe Called Red & Lisa LeBlanc toured Parliament Hill with MP Patrick Brown, which included a visit to the Senate, the Library of Parliament, and the Peace Tower.

LibraryParliament
Photo: A Tribe Called Red and Lisa Leblanc in the Library of Parliament

Photo by John Major Photography

PeaceTower
Photo: A Tribe Called Red and Lisa Leblanc in the Peace Tower
Photo by John Major Photography

MinisterArtists
Photo: A Tribe Called Red, Lisa Leblanc, and the Honourable Shelly Glover at Parliament

Photo by John Major Photography

 

SpeakerReception
Photo: A Tribe Called Red, Lisa Leblanc, and the Honourable Andrew Scheer at the Speaker’s Reception

Photo by John Major Photography

SergeSpeaking
Photo: Serge Sasseville, Senior Vice President, Corporate and Institutional Affairs, Quebecor, speaks at the National Arts Centre

Photo by John Major Photography

GHSpeaking2
Photo: Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada, speaks at the National Arts Centre

Photo by John Major Photography

GaryClement
Photo: Gary Clement, Senior Manager, Government Relations, TD Bank Group, speaks at the National Arts Centre

Photo by John Major Photography

MinisterSpeaking
Photo: the Honourable Shelly Glover, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, speaks at the National Arts Centre

Photo by John Major Photography

After a sound check and meet and greet at the National Arts Centre, Lisa LeBlanc kicked off the show, wowing the audience with her energetic performance on guitar and banjo, drawing comparisons to kd lang, Linda Ronstadt, and Janis Joplin. LeBlanc earned a standing ovation from the crowd, who were clapping and stomping their feet along with the music.

A Tribe Called Red’s set continued the high level of energy in the room, both with their mix of traditional pow wow drumming and dubstep and electronic music, and the incredible dancing from James Jones, the traditional hoop dancer who joined them on stage. By the end of their set, members of the audience were on stage as well, joining James in a circle dance.

After their performances, both bands joined members of the audience in a post-reception in the lobby, signing autographs and snapping photos with their new fans.
Several guests of the events shared highlighted from the concert on Twitter, embedded below:

 

For more photos from the event, see our album on our Facebook page.

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FitMix launched as one-stop music solution for fitness instructors

Canadian fitness instructors have a new option for high-energy music to power their spin classes and bootcamp sessions: FitMix Inc. is a new digital service offering a one-stop music solution for fitness instructors.FitMixPlaylist

Licensed by all of Canada’s major labels and top independent labels through Connect Music Licensing, FitMix leases continuous mixes of ten to twelve songs, which are mixed especially for exercise classes. As Julie from Fitmix described, this means the mixes are continuous, which allows the exercise classes to maintain their pace as there are no breaks between the songs. Each mix is timed between 45 and 48 minutes, so classes keep a consistent time.

The tempo of Fitmix’s songs are also designed to fit with exercise class routines, with the songs’ beats per minutes matching the desired intensity of the class. As the chart shows, some of the latest FitMixes gradually gain intensity, while others end with a slower song for the cool-down portion of the class.

FitMix is a welcome addition for instructors, says Julie, because it allows them to have a one-stop shop for their music, which is pre-licensed and allows them to spend their time working with clients instead of preparing playlists, which is generally unpaid work for instructors. The Connect Music License covers the reproduction of sound recordings, while the gym operaters can cover the public performance of the music with a license from SOCAN & Re:Sound.

FitMix releases are in mp3 format, which allows instructors to bring them to class on their mp3 player or mobile phone. All of FitMix’s songs are performed by the original artist, and are clean versions to avoid offensive language during classes.

For more information, visit their website at https://fitmix.ca/.FitMixBPMs

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Record Store Day 2014: Celebrating independent record stores from coast to coast

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This Saturday, April 19th is the 7th Annual Record Store Day, and independent record shops from across Canada will be celebrating with special releases, live-in store performances, and special deals. Record Store Day was created in 2007 by a group of independent record store owners and employees as a way to celebrate the unique culture of the independent record store, and the special role these stores play in their local communities. Today, Record Store Day is celebrated in stores on every continent except Antarctica.

To find a participating store near you, visit Record Store Day Canada’s list of participating stores.

Independent stores celebrating from coast to coast:

Record Store Day 2014 is a cross-Canada celebration, with more than 170 stores across Canada celebrating, with shops in all ten provinces taking part.

Fred’s Records in historic downtown St. John’s, Newfoundland, will be the first store in Canada to open on Record Store Day, as the only store in the Newfoundland Time Zone. They open their doors at 9am and will be hosting live in-store performances and are promising “the usual bevy of limited edition vinyl.”

Back Alley Music is Prince Edward Island’s go-to Record Store Day location, and will feature live music from The Meds, Al Tuck, Emilee Sorrey, Peter Forbes, and more. In addition to the performances, Back Alley will have exclusive RSD releases and deals on new and used LPs.

In Nova Scotia, Halifax’s Black Buffalo Records, Obsolete Records, and Taz Records will be filled with vinyl-loving Haligonians. The Coast features an informative overview of RSD happenings in the three stores, as well as a look ahead to the Halifax Record Fair on May 3rd.

New Brunswickers will have multiple options to get their RSD fix, with Moncton’s Spin-It Records & Video featuring live music from Michael Goguen, Colonial Quarrels, Outtacontroller, Kappa Chow, and Fifty Feet of Earth, while Live Wire Records and Music Emporium will be opening at 8am, and will feature RSD exclusive releases, food, and door prizes. Also in Moncton, Frank’s Music at 245 Carson Drive will be celebrating Record Store Day beginning at 10am.

150 km down the Trans-Canada Highway in Saint John, Backstreet Records kicks off their celebration at 8am with special releases and live performances beginning at 1pm. Also in Saint John, SecondSpin will be celebrating with special releases, sales, and prizes, beginning at 10am.

Backstreet Records’ Fredericton location is celebrating with special releases and live performances beginning at noon.

Quebecers have a bevy of Record Store Day options, with nine stores taking part in Montreal, including Aux 33 Tours, Beatnick, Boutique L’Oblique, Le Pick Up, Phonopolis, Primitive, Sonik, Sonorama, and Soundcentral. In Quebec City, Cd Mélomane and Sillons le disquaire are your sources for that special RSD vinyl. Other participating stores in La belle province include Rimouski’s Audition Musik, Sherbrooke’s Musique Cité, and Saint-Hyacinthe’s Fréquences Le Disquaire.

Ontarians have lots of options for RSD swag, with Belleville’s Sam the Record Man, Bowmanville’s Vinyl Alibi, Brantford’s The Beat Goes On, Burlington’s Looney Tunes, Cobourg’s Zap Records, Dundas’ Records on Wheels, Hamilton’s Dr. Disc, Hammer City Records, and The Beat Goes On, Kanata’s CD Warehouse, Kingston’s The Jungle and Zap Records, Kitchener’s Encore Records, The Beat Goes On, and X-Disc-C Music all taking part, in addition to happenings at Lindsay’s Iceman’s Games Movies and Music, London’s Grooves, Hot Dog Musique and Cinema, Speed City Records, and the Beat Goes On. Merrickville’s Vinyl Destination, Mississauga’s Ric’s Recollections, Nepean’s CD Warehouse, and Oshawa’s Star Records. Peterborough’s Bluestreak Records, Port Dover’s Robot Café, Sarnia’s Cheeky Monkey and Red Vinyl Records are all taking part, while Ottawatonians can visit CD Warehouse – Ottawa, Compact Music, LEGEND RECORDS, The Record Centre, or Vertigo Records for their fix. Sunrise Records in Barrie, Brantford, Burlington, Etobicoke, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Scarborough, St. Catharines, Toronto and Willowdale are all taking part. For more on Toronto’s RSD offerings, see BlogTO’s overview.

In Manitoba, eight shops are participating in Record Store Day in Winnipeg. The Winnipeg Free Press’ Jen Zoratti has a great overview of RSD events in The Peg , where Argy’s Collectables, Into the Music,McNally Robinson, Music Trader,Planet of Sound, the Winnipeg Record & Tape Co., War on Music, and the Winnipeg Folk Festival Music Store celebrate with special releases and live in-store performances.

Saskatchewan is represented by Regina’s X-Ray Records and Saskatoon’s Vinyl Diner , Bluemont Film & Record, the Vinyl Exchange, all of whom will be celebrating RSD in their own way.

In Alberta, Calgarians can celebrate Record Store Day at Heritage Posters & Music,Hot Wax Records, Recordland,the Inner Sleeve, Melodiya Records, andSloth Records. Jerry Keogh of Heritage Posters and Music spoke with Breakfast Television Calgary about what vinyl fans can expect at his shop this RSD beginning at 9am.
In Edmonton, Blackbyrd Myoozik, Freecloud Records, Listen Records, Permanent Records, Sound Connection, and the Gramophone Inc. will be taking part in RSD, which is a nice lead-in to the Edmonton Music Collectors Show, happening April 27th.

British Columbia boasts a bounty of participating record shops, with Vancouver represented by Audiophile, Beatstreet Records, Dandelion Records & Emporium, Highlife Records, Red Cat Records,Scrape Records, Sikora’s Classical Records, Vinyl Records, Zoo Zhop, and Zulu Records. In Victoria, Ditch Records & CDs, Lyle’s Place, Talk’s Cheap, and the Turntable will be outfitting vinyl fans with special RSD releases. Vinyl fans can also get their RSD fix at Kelowna’s Milkcrate Records or Underground Music, Penticton’s Remember Vinyl Records or The Grooveyard, Richmond’s Beat Merchant, Salt Spring Island’s Salt Spring Sound, or Maple Ridge’s The CD Shack.

For the official list of special releases, visit http://www.recordstoreday.com/SpecialReleases, or download the PDF here.

For more on Canadian record store promotions this Record Store Day, visit http://recordstoredaycanada.com/, follow our Twitter List of Canadian record stores, and get out to visit your local record store!

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2014 Prism Prize Winners Announced

Last night, the 2nd annual Prism Prize Award Reception took place at The Everleigh in Toronto, ON. The Prism Prize is a national juried award established to recognize the artistry of the modern music video in Canada. The 2014 Prism Prize was awarded to director/photographer Emily Kai Block for Arcade Fire’s “Afterlife” from their Triple Platinum-certified album Reflektor. Bock, who was also nominated for Majical Cloudz’s “Childhood’s End” this year, was on hand to accept the $5,000 prize.

“Emily made some truly remarkable videos last year,” said Prism Prize Founder and Director Louis Calabro, “it says something that two of Emily’s pieces were on the Top Ten Shortlist. Ultimately, I think our jurors chose Afterlife because it’s thoughtful and well-paced, and because – frankly – it looks beautiful.”

The Prism Prize Audience Choice Award, which is awarded based on thousands of online votes collected in collaboration with Exclaim! Magazine, was presented to director Kheaven Lewandowski for The Belle Game’s “River”.

Other videos on the shortlist, which was selected by a jury of more than ninety Canadian music and film industry professionals, included Hollerado, Keys N Krates, Shad, Jessy Lanza, Young Galaxy and Drake.

Writer/director Scott Cudmore and producer/cinematographer Michael Leblanc received the inaugural Arthur Lipsett Award, which recognizes an innovative and unique approach to music video art. Floria Sigismondi received the inaugural Prism Prize Special Achievement Award, presented to a Canadian music video artist for their artistic achievements and exceptional contribution to music video art on a world stage.

Plans for the third annual Prism Prize will be announced later this year. Congratulations to all of the 2014 Prism Prize winners and nominees.

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Digital Music Report 2014 released by the IFPI

Today, the IFPI released the Digital Music Report 2014, which provides a comprehensive overview of today’s global digital music sector, including statistics on international markets, developments in the licensed online marketplace, and industry efforts to tackle online piracy.

DMR14 largeThe IFPI says that despite positive growth in most markets, overall global music trade revenues fell by 3.9% in 2013, to US$15.0 billion. This was heavily influenced by a drop of 16.7% in Japan, which accounts for more than one fifth of global revenues. Excluding Japan, the overall global recorded music market was generally flat, declining by 0.1% in 2013.

This report highlights the growth in music subscription services, which helped drive growth in most major markets in 2013, as revenues from subscription services grew by 51%, helping global digital revenues grow by 4.3%. Global revenues from streaming and subscription services topped the US$1 billion mark for the first time in 2013.

Digital downloads and physical formats remain an important revenue stream for the global recorded music industry, as downloads account for 67% of digital revenues, and physical product sales account for more than half (51.4%) of all global revenues.

Performance rights revenue, generated from broadcast, internet radio, and venues, saw strong growth in 2013, as performance rights income to record companies reached US$1.1 billion, an increase of 19% over 2012. Income from synchronization deals, where music is placed in film, television, or advertisements, declined by 3.4% in 2013, now accounting for 2.1% of total industry revenue, the report states.

The report includes the IFPI’s Global Recording Artist Chart, which measures the popularity of an artist across an array of channels, including digital downloads, streaming services, and physical format sales. One Direction topped the chart in its first year of being tabulated, while Burnaby, British Columbia’s Michael Bublé achieved the #9 position.

The report also profiles how record labels utilize the digital world in promoting artist releases, with features on innovative promotional campaigns, including:

  • Sony Music Entertainment’s global campaign for Daft Punk – Random Access Memories , which coordinated physical advertisements like billboards with television ad buys and digital teaser videos to achieve the robot duo’s vision of a global album release
  • Universal Music Group International’s campaign with Avicii, which partnered with Ericsson to create a ‘crowd sourced’ hit song, and later unveiled the album as a live performance at the Ultra Music Festival, helping Avicii grow from a club DJ to a global superstar
  • Warner Music Nashville/Atlantic Records’ innovative ‘Youtube Orchestra’ campaign with Hunter Hayes, which enlisted a range of ‘Youtube Stars’ to post their own versions of his song, Everybody’s Got Somebody But Me, with Hayes and Justin Mraz creating a mashup of the videos in a one-shot music video
  • Passenger’s partnership with German indie label Embassy of Music, which worked with Sony Music Netherlands to campaign in the smaller Dutch radio market to establish a foothold on the airwaves
  • Katy Perry’s PRISM campaign, in which Capitol Music Group developed multiple promotional campaigns for the album’s various singles, including international events in Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, and Japan

To view the full report, visit http://www.ifpi.org/digital-music-report.php.

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