Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

Join Mailing List

Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

 Music Canada

Tag archive: Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage (7)

view

Music Canada Celebrates Ground-Breaking Parliamentary Report on Copyright Act Reform

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage has released its report on the Copyright Act, making important and timely recommendations to address the growing Value Gap in Canada’s creative industries. The report, titled Shifting Paradigms, is now available on Parliament’s website.

The report, based on testimony from dozens of creators and representatives from Canada’s creative industries as well as broadcasters, digital services, and other key commercial users and distributors, tackles numerous weaknesses in Canada’s Copyright Act, identifying elements which have failed to keep pace with technology and the digital marketplace for music. Among its key recommendations which will bolster a functioning marketplace for creative works, the report recommended addressing Canada’s broad safe harbour laws, eliminating or narrowing exemptions from the Act that prevent creators from being fairly compensated, combating modern forms of piracy (like stream ripping) and strengthening the enforcement of Canada’s copyright laws.

“I applaud the Members of the Committee for listening to the voices of artists and the businesses who support music and for taking these critical first steps toward addressing the Value Gap in Canada,” said Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson.

“The Committee’s report provides a series of thoughtful and concrete recommendations to address the underlying causes of the Value Gap. Many of the recommendations will significantly and immediately improve the lives of artists and our industry.”

The report’s recommendations on music specifically call for ending what amounts to a subsidy paid by Canadian artists and labels to Canada’s largest broadcasters. It recommends limiting the Radio Royalty Exemption to only community and/or independent stations.  

The report also calls for amending the definition of “sound recording” in the Copyright Act so that recordings used in television programs and films would be eligible for public performance remuneration.

Miranda Mulholland, a professional musician, record label owner, and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council, spoke to the Committee about how addressing the Radio Royalty Exemption and amending the definition of “sound recording” to end these subsidies paid by artists would make an immediate improvement in the livelihood of creators.

“The changes recommended by the Heritage Committee in this report are the first step in ensuring artists receive fair remuneration for their work,” said Mulholland. “The changes would end the unfair subsidies that artists have been paying large broadcasting corporations, and mean more creators can earn a sustainable living from their music. I thank the members of the Committee for hearing the concerns of artists, and making strong recommendations to close the Value Gap in Canada.”

“As a working musician, I am glad to see the Heritage Committee has given such careful consideration to improving the copyright framework supporting the music industry in Canada. The recommendations in this report would go a long way in restoring the musician’s middle class,” said Eon Sinclair, a JUNO Award-winning bassist, entrepreneur, philanthropist and a founding member of the Canadian band Bedouin Soundclash. Sinclair is also a member of the Music Canada Advisory Council.

“Today’s report moves Canada into a leadership role in the international effort to close the Value Gap and address the harm being done to creators everywhere by overly broad safe harbour laws,” added Henderson.

“In order for these recommendations to make an impact on the music community, they must become law,” continued Henderson. “Music Canada looks forward to working with the Government to reform the Copyright Act as soon as possible to reflect the Committee’s recommendations.”

– 30 –

For more information:
Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage releases new report examining cultural hubs and cultural districts

Earlier this month, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage released a report entitled A Vision For Cultural Hubs And Districts In Canada. This report was the outcome of a Committee study on cultural districts and hubs in Canada, with a particular focus on determining the role they play in city building, their economic impacts, their effects on arts and culture, and how the federal government can better foster and support the development of these spaces.

The Committee held eight meetings earlier this year, with Music Canada’s Executive Vice President Amy Terrill appearing as a witness during this process.

The report provides a summary of the federal government’s current initiatives regarding cultural hubs and districts, and outlines various policy perspectives on key related topics including: the social and economic impact of cultural hubs and districts, the various collaborative approaches to developing cultural hubs and districts, barriers to securing funding, and the important role of infrastructure considerations. The report also contains 18 Committee recommendations to the Government of Canada.

One of the key issues discussed in the report is how exactly a cultural hub and cultural district can be defined. Witnesses throughout the eight Committee meetings provided a number of different interpretations of what constitutes a hub or district, offering definitions that ranged from fairly encompassing to more rigidly defined. Music Canada has submitted our own recommendation regarding how cultural hubs and cultural districts should be categorized, in addition to recommending that the Department of Canadian Heritage’s definition for cultural hubs be expanded. It was encouraging to see that the official Committee recommendation reflected this assertion, with the specific language calling on the Department to “broaden the definition of a cultural hub to, among others, consider new technological art forms.”

Another important topic highlighted in the report outlined the various collaborative approaches that can be taken to developing cultural hubs and cultural districts. Alongside the role of the government, partnerships have been found to be the key to the successful creation of projects relating to cultural hubs or districts. Indeed, as EVP Amy Terrill highlighted in her testimony before the Committee, collaboration between the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors is a critical component of cultivating a flourishing network of cultural spaces and sustaining a vibrant cultural sector.

Other key issues that were outlined in the report include:

  • The social impact of cultural hubs and cultural districts, such as their role in empowering local communities and contribution to fostering inclusion
  • The economic impact of cultural districts and hubs, with a particular focus on their role as economic drivers and tourism generators
  • The distinct roles of federal, provincial, and municipal governments in encouraging the development of cultural hubs and districts
  • The barriers to securing operational funding for cultural spaces
  • The potential of introducing tax measures and incentives to support the development of cultural hubs and districts, and other types of social public spaces
  • The challenges posed by a lack of affordable spaces in urban centres and the impact of rising real estate prices on public spaces

Read the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s full report on the House of Commons website.

Comments
view

Landslide European Copyright Directive vote is a call to action for legislators globally to fix the Value Gap

Music Canada joins our European counterparts in applauding the European Parliament for today’s historic vote on the European Copyright Directive. The vote is a vital step towards ensuring Europe’s creators are paid fairly when their work is consumed online, and provides a strong example for other governments to follow to support their own creators.

“Congratulations to the European Parliament on today’s historic vote to create a framework for creativity to flourish in the digital marketplace. We also need to acknowledge the incredible impact of creator voices to this campaign – thank you to all of the artists who spoke up with such passion and honesty,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada.

“Today’s landslide vote is a call to action for governments around the world – We must all act with urgency. The Value Gap is a global issue of critical importance to the current and future health of creators and the creative industries. Here in Canada, our Heritage and Industry’s committees have heard loud and clear from creators that the Value Gap threatens Canadian culture and needs to be fixed. These committees have done excellent work so far and they must seize this opportunity. Let’s close the Value Gap NOW!”

In 2017 Music Canada released The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach. The first-of-its-kind report describes the Value Gap as “the significant disparity between the value of creative content that is accessed and enjoyed by consumers, and the revenues that are returned to the people and businesses who create it.” To protect the livelihoods of creators, businesses and cultures, creators and creative groups around the globe have been urging governments to enact legislative changes to ensure creators receive fair compensation for the use of their works.

The European vote comes as the Canadian government is conducting its own review of the Copyright Act. Numerous stakeholders have raised the Value Gap as a key issue at the Standing Committee for Industry, Science and Technology, as well as the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s study on Remuneration Models for Artists and Creative Industries. Additionally, through Focus On Creators, more than 3,700 creators have signed a letter urging the government to place creators at the heart of our country’s cultural policy.

A release from Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada states that a “well-functioning copyright framework should enable Canada’s creators to take full advantage of the opportunities presented by digital technology, provide a supportive environment for business and investment, and position creators for success in a competitive marketplace.”

Music Canada is committed to continuing to work with the government of Canada throughout the review process to close the Value Gap here at home.

Comments
view

Graham Henderson’s testimony at the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s study of Remuneration Models for Artists and Creative Industries

Earlier today Music Canada’s President and CEO, Graham Henderson, appeared before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage to provide testimony on remuneration models for artists and creative industries as part of the Copyright Act review. Below is the full-text of Henderson’s remarks.

 

My name is Graham Henderson, and I am the President and CEO of Music Canada. We are a passionate advocate for music and those who create it.

I am very pleased to see the Heritage Committee studying remuneration models for artists and creative industries. This is an aspect of the music industry ecosystem that I, and Music Canada, have for years been working to modernize. Creating a functioning marketplace where creators receive fair compensation for the use of their works forms the bedrock of our mission.

But the reality for Canadian music creators is there are provisions in our own Copyright Act that prevent them from receiving fair market value for their work.

I believe the best way that this committee can assist in creating a marketplace that is transparent and supports Canadian creators is by providing the government with straightforward, accessible solutions to address the Value Gap.

Music Canada produced a comprehensive report on the Value Gap in Canada which you will find in French and English in front of you.

We define the Value Gap as “the significant disparity between the value of creative content that is accessed and enjoyed by consumers, and the revenues that are returned to the people and businesses who create it.”

Today, more music is consumed than at any time in history. However, the remuneration for that content has not kept pace with the record levels of consumption.

I was pleased to hear Minister Joly recognize this point earlier this year, when she stated:

“The benefits of the digital economy have not been shared equally. Too many creators, journalists, artists have been left behind.”

The origins of the Value Gap extend back more than two decades to a time when countries around the world, including Canada, began adapting and interpreting laws created in another era to protect common carrier telephone companies in the then-dawning digital marketplace.

Around the world those laws understood the internet as a series of “dumb” pipes where your browsing habits were anonymous and the data travelling between sites was so vast it was unknowable. But twenty years later we know the Internet is composed of the “smartest pipes” humankind has ever made.  Your web habits are meticulously tracked and the metadata that it generates is collected, analyzed and sold every second of everyday.

While well-intentioned when they were created, the impact of these laws today is that wealth has been diverted from creators into the pockets of massive digital intermediaries, and what little is left over for creators is concentrated into fewer and fewer hands. As a result, the creative middle class is disappearing, if it hasn’t disappeared already, and with it, numerous jobs and opportunities.

There is no need to point fingers. No one planned for the creative middle class to suffer. The important thing at this juncture is to move forward purposefully and without delay to get the rules right. You should make absolutely certain that Canada’s Copyright Act ensures a creator’s right to be fairly remunerated when their work is commercialized by others.

The foundation of the Value Gap is outdated safe harbour policies and exceptions – all around the world. A safe harbour, by the way, is a way to limit the liability of an intermediary and allow music to be consumed without payment. I know that Ministers Joly and Bains are working on this issue and having conversations with their international counterparts to find a solution to this problem.

But here in Canada, there are particular laws that exacerbate the Value Gap by effectively requiring individual creators to subsidize billion dollar commercial technology companies.  Here are four steps that this committee could recommend immediately that would help creators immediately and harmonize Canadian policy with international standards:

  1. Remove the $1.25 Million Radio Royalty Exemption
    Since 1997, commercial radio stations have been exempted from paying royalties on their first $1.25 million in advertising revenue. It amounts to an $8 million annual cross-industry subsidy paid by artists and their recording industry partners to large, vertically-integrated and highly profitable media companies. Internationally, no other country has a similar subsidy, and the exemption does not apply for songwriter and publisher royalties – meaning that performers and record labels are the only rights holders whose royalties are used to subsidize the commercial radio industry. The exemption is unjustified and should be eliminated.
  2. Amend the Definition of ‘Sound Recording’ in the Copyright Act
    The current definition of a “sound recording” in the Copyright Act excludes performers and record labels from receiving royalties for the use of their work in television and film soundtracks. This exception is unique to television and film soundtracks, and does not apply to composers, songwriters and music publishers. It is inequitable and unjustified, particularly in light of the profound role music plays in soundtracks, and it is costly to artists and record labels, who continue to subsidize those who exploit their recordings to the tune of $55 million per year. The Act should be amended to remove this cross-subsidy.
  3. Amending the term of copyright for musical works
    The term of copyright protection in Canada for the authors of musical works is out of line with international copyright norms. Under the Copyright Act, protection for musical works subsists for the duration of the author’s life plus a further period of 50 years. By contrast, the majority of Canada’s largest trading partners recognize longer copyright terms for musical works, and a general standard of the life of the author plus 70 years has emerged. I note that a vice-chair of this committee, Mr. Van Loan, introduced a Private Members bill on this issue and we thank you for your support.
  4. Private Copying: Renew Support for Music Creators
    The private copying levy, originally intended to be technologically neutral, has been limited by various decisions to media that are effectively obsolete.  This important source of earned income for over 100,000 music creators is now in jeopardy unless the regime is updated. Music creators are asking for the creation of an interim four-year fund of $40 million per year. This will ensure that music creators continue to receive fair compensation for private copies made until a more permanent, long-term solution can be enacted.

Each of these changes removes an unfair subsidy, harmonizes the laws within our industries and brings us to international standards, and they can be done today.

As the creative community anxiously awaited this review of the Copyright Act, an organization called Focus On Creators sent Minister Joly a letter that has now been signed by more than 3,650 Canadian creators.  In that letter, the creators discussed their concerns with the Value Gap and how the Value Gap is causing the middle-class artist to disappear in Canada. The creators’ letter concludes with a message I hope you will take to heart, “We know you understand the cultural significance of our work; we hope you also see its value and crucial place in Canada’s economy. We ask that you put creators at the heart of future policy.”

Thank you.

Comments
view

Music Canada EVP Amy Terrill’s remarks at the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s study on Cultural Hubs

This morning, Music Canada’s Executive Vice President Amy Terrill participated in the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s study on Cultural Hubs and Cultural Districts in Canada.

Her remarks, which pulled from Terrill’s extensive Music Cities research, including The Mastering of a Music City report, are included below.

Remarks (check against delivery): 

Chair MP Dabrusin,

Distinguished members of the committee,

 

Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you today.  I’d like to commend you on your study as it is an active topic of discussion currently across the country.

My interest stems from my work on Music Cities which we began at Music Canada in 2011.

We define Music Cities as a municipality of any size that has a vibrant music economy which is intentionally supported and promoted.

Since 2014 I’ve led our study of close to 30 international cities and become one of the world’s leading thinkers on the topic.   I’ve advised cities on every continent and spoken at countless events.  I’m an active member of music city committees in Vancouver and Toronto.

Music Canada published a roadmap for the development of a Music City in 2015 and since then about a dozen Canadian cities or regions have taken that roadmap and begun to develop music strategies – including most recently Ottawa which released a strategy just two weeks ago.

 

One of the most important components of a Music City is the availability of spaces and places – to rehearse, record, perform – It’s also likely the top issue identified in Canadian communities.

Some of the common concerns that arise in public surveys and focus groups relating to music are:

  1. Lack of affordable rehearsal spaces; live-work spaces – and housing in general
  2. Pressure on small grassroots venues – affordability pressures – and pressures that come about from mixed use areas – venue closures are creating gaps in what we call the venue ladder which is needed to adequately incubate artists
  3. Heavy red tape is also cited
  4. The need for greater audience engagement
  5. And greater opportunities to collaborate – to connect with other professionals – both within music – and also across the cultural sectors

Creative hubs and cultural districts can, in their own ways, respond to these commonly identified needs and in so doing accomplish larger policy, economic, or cultural goals.

 

In our Music City investigation – we have identified three typical formats for creative hubs:

  • Hubs that are artist-centric with recording facilities, rehearsal and performance spaces, workshops, access to professional services like lawyers or accountants. The Kitchener Public Library is emerging as a cultural hub of this kind.
  • A music business incubator like you might see for other industries providing hot desks, networking events, business development support and training.
  • Or a combination of the two; The Music District in Fort Collins Colorado is a great example. 4000 square feet with programming aimed at both of the two groups, plus outreach to the broader community.

Cultural districts, on the other hand, allow municipalities, in particular, the flexibility to design rules and regulations that can be used to nurture creative activities and organizations in a set geographic area.

Both of these tools are ultimately about creating spaces and places for cultural uses.

 

As you consider this topic and how best the federal government can support them there are two key things I’d like you to remember:

Music spaces are sometimes not what you might expect.

A large portion are not buildings built specifically for a music purpose.  Likely half of the inventory is made up of multi-use, repurposed or unusual spaces.  Bars, restaurants, coffee shops, libraries, retail spaces, micro-breweries, repurposed industrial properties – to name a few.

In large cities and small towns – places for musical creation and performance are emerging from unique raw materials.

Similarly creative hubs do not fit a tight definition – I encourage you to think in broad terms about what qualifies as a creative hub.

And secondly this network of cultural spaces is composed of a mix of for-profit and not-for-profit– both are critical for the sustenance of our cultural sector.

The same artists who perform at not-for-profit venues, perform at for-profit venues – it really makes no difference.

Our cultural districts are also made up of this mix.

Commercial entities – as an example music venues or music studios – are important tenants in cultural districts and struggle with some of the same challenges facing their non-profit cousins, but typically do not qualify for federal funding programs.

Queen Street West was mentioned in the department’s testimony.  One of Queen West’s most iconic and longest-serving operators – the Legendary Horseshoe Tavern – is only able to maintain its space thanks to the generosity of the building’s owners.  Should the landlord choose to charge market rent – the Horseshoe could not remain.

Other jurisdictions have recognized the important contributions of the commercial sector – and that they too face affordability pressures – and heightened demands from nearby residents to mitigate sound – and have made loans or grants available to venues to upgrade their facilities or acquire specialized equipment.

This is something that could be considered in an enhanced funding program.

Again – I applaud you for your study.

Thank you and I look forward to expanding on some of these issues in the Q&A.

Comments
view

Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage releases Review of the Canadian Music Industry report

Yesterday, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage released its Review of the Canadian Music Industry report, available at http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/412/CHPC/Reports/RP6661036/412_CHPC_Rpt05_PDF/412_CHPC_Rpt05-e.pdf.

Music Canada applauds the Committee for its comprehensive study of Canada’s music industry, and thanks the Committee members for their care in considering testimony from witnesses across many different facets of Canada’s music industry. The Committee held 14 meetings on the study, hearing from 82 witnesses and receiving 15 briefs. This process allowed the Committee to hear from stakeholders from areas that they may normally have less opportunity to interact with, such as music education and music tourism.The Committee report focuses on five themes:

  • Digital distribution and streaming
  • Music education
  • Music tourism
  • Current funding – future investment
  • FACTOR/Musicaction

The report gives an overview of the current state of the Canadian music industry, summarizes witness testimony on the five themes, and considers outcomes proposed by witnesses on each theme.

The report provides the government with ten recommendations for strengthening its support for the Canadian music industry:

  1. The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada examine the time that it takes for decisions to be rendered by the Copyright Board of Canada ahead of the upcoming review of the Copyright Act so that any changes could be considered by the Copyright Board of Canada as soon as possible.
  2. The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada work with provincial authorities and other stakeholders to improve the musical knowledge and skills of Canadians.
  3. The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada work with stakeholders in order to launch an information campaign on the actual cost of creating music, the negative impacts of illegal downloading and the importance of respecting the intellectual property of music creators, with an outcome of assisting the music industry in terms of improved measures and initiatives related to these issues, including preventing piracy.
  4. The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada work with stakeholders from the Canadian music industry and the Canadian tourism industry to make music tourism in Canada a focus of marketing campaigns.
  5. The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada study the economic impact of introducing a tax credit to support the Canadian music industry, taking inspiration, if needed, from those granted to the film and television industries.
  6. The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada undertake a study of the impact of digital technology on the Canadian music industry and on government funding programs.
  7. The Committee recommends that the Department of Canadian Heritage ensure that the various components of the Canada Music Fund reflect the changes in Canada’s music industry, including potential new sources of funding from the private sector, with special attention given to creators, entrepreneurs and independent producers.
  8. The Committee recommends that the administration of the Music Entrepreneur Component of the Canada Music Fund be transferred from the Department of Canadian Heritage to a new third-party organization(s) based on the model of FACTOR and Musicaction.
  9. The Committee recommends that the Department of Canadian Heritage ensure that the general public and recipients are aware that FACTOR and Musicaction funding is made on behalf of the Government of Canada.
  10. The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada give the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission the capacity to enforce the requirement for the private broadcasters to pay, in a timely manner, the required annual contribution for Canadian content development

It is positive that the Committee recommends the government examine the time it takes for decisions to be rendered by the Copyright Board of Canada ahead of the upcoming review of the Copyright Act. Numerous witnesses, including Music Canada, identified the length of time for decisions to be rendered by the Board as a cause of uncertainty in the legal landscape and a deterrent to progress. As the report notes, a dozen witnesses identified insufficient resources as a reason the rate-setting process is so lengthy. We support providing the Copyright Board with the proper tools, personnel and financing to function more as a business development office, as well as Parliament allowing rights holders and digital services to do deals directly at fair market value.

We are very pleased to see the Committee recognize the importance of music education to all Canadians. As the report notes, the positive effects of music education came up repeatedly during the Committee’s study, with several witnesses urging support for music education as it fosters critical thinking, imagination, self-esteem, and self-discipline, assets which are useful in an economy based on information technology and communications. It is gratifying to see our Next Big Bang report cited on this point in the report.

We are supportive of the Committee’s recommendation that the government work with stakeholders to develop information campaigns on the value of music, the negative impacts of illegal downloading, and the importance of respecting the intellectual property rights of creators. We would be very happy to work with the government in developing these campaigns.

The Committee’s recommendation that the government work with stakeholders from Canada’s music and tourism industries to make music tourism in Canada a focus of marketing campaigns is a very positive step. This study allowed the Committee to hear of the opportunities in music tourism from stakeholders such as North by Northeast, Live Nation Canada, and Ticketmaster Canada, all of who identified the enormous potential for in Canada’s live music sector. As well, the Committee heard from the Canadian Tourism Commission, who identified music as an important part of its marketing and tourism offerings, and the Tourism Industry Association of Canada, who remarked that music and culture are “leading drivers for American visitation.”

We are very pleased to see the Committee recommend the study of introducing a tax credit to support the music industry, taking inspiration, if needed from the existing tax credit system for film and television industries. The development of artists is a form of R&D and is deserving of public support, similar to the tax credits available in other R&D-intensive industries.

The Committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to the Report.

The report has the support of the three main parties, with some additional recommendations made by the New Democratic Party and the Liberal Party. In particular, the Liberal complementary report suggests more comprehensive changes to Copyright Board based on testimony from witnesses.

Music Canada urges the government to support the findings of the report and looks forward to working with the government on implementing its recommendations.

Comments
view

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage – Review of the Canadian Music Industry

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage has undertaken a Review of the Canadian Music Industry, following an approved motion at the Committee on December 5, 2013, where “it was agreed, — That, pursuant to S.O. 108(2) the Committee undertake a review of the Canadian music industry… in order to:

a) inform Committee members of the details and impacts of the government support on Canadian music, as well as the creators and entrepreneurs who create and distribute music in Canada;

b) determine how funding is allocated;

c) to establish whether the government support is meeting the objectives laid out for it, and to make recommendations to the government on how it might strengthen support for Canadian music, and report its findings to the House.”

 

 

Music Canada is looking forward for an opportunity to address the committee on themes as explored in The Next Big Bang, A New Direction for Music in Canada.

For reference, links to witness appearances and transcripts are below, and we will update this page following future appearances.

Past Meetings:

March 4, 2014:
Witnesses:
Department of Canadian Heritage: Jean-François Bernier, Director General, Cultural Industries; Sophie Couture, Director, Music Policy and Programs.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

March 25, 2014:
Witnesses:
Society for Reproduction Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers in Canada
: Alain Lauzon, General Manager.
Connect Music Licensing: Victoria Shepherd, Executive Director.
Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists: Brad Keenan, Director, Recording Artists’ Collecting Society; David Faber, Canadian Musician, Faber Drive .
Association québécoise de l’industrie du disque, du spectacle et de la vidéo (ADISQ) : Solange Drouin, Vice-President of Public Affairs and Executive Director.
Canadian Independent Music Association: Stuart Johnston, President; Shauna de Cartier, Chair.
Music BC Industry Association: Robert D’Eith, Executive Director.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

March 27, 2014:
Witnesses:
Canadian Music Publishers Association: Elisabeth Bihl, Executive Director; Jodie Ferneyhough, President.
Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada: Gilles Daigle, General Counsel and Head of Legal Services.
Professional Music Publishers’ Association: David Murphy, President.
Library and Archives of Canada: Hervé Déry, Acting Librarian and Archivist of Canada, Office of the Librarian and Archivist of Canada; Cecilia Muir, Chief Operating Officer, Office of the Chief Operating Officer.
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission: Scott Hutton, Executive Director, Broadcasting; Annie Laflamme, Director, Radio Policy and Applications.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio Streams

April 1, 2014
Witnesses:
Alliance nationale de l’industrie musicale
: Natalie Bernardin, President; Benoit Henry, Chief Executive Officer.
Songwriters Association of Canada: Greg Johnston, Vice-President; Jean-Robert Bisaillon, Vice-President.
Gospel Music Association of Canada: Martin Smith, President.
Volu.me: Shawn Cooper, President and Co-Founder.
SiriusXM Canada: Andréanne Sasseville, Director, Canadian Content Development and Industry Relations; Paul Cunningham, Vice-President.
Songza: Vanessa Thomas, Managing Director, Canada.
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

April 8, 2014
Witnesses:

Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences:
Allan Reid, Director, MusiCounts
As individuals: Brett Kissel; Louis O’Reilly, Manager, O’Reilly International Inc.
Re:Sound Music Licensing Company: Ian MacKay, President
Avalanche Productions and Sound Publishing: Sébastien Nasra, President-Founder, M for Montreal – Mundial Montreal
Artisti and Union des artistes: Richard Petit; Annie Morin, Director
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

April 10, 2014
Witnesses:
Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec: Pierre-Daniel Rheault, Chief Executive Officer
Canadian Federation of Musicians: Mark Tetreault, Director of Symphonic Services
Guilde des musiciens et musiciennes du Québec: Luc Fortin, President
North by Northeast (NXNE): Mike Tanner, Director of Operations
Live Nation Canada: Riley O’Connor, Chairman; Ken Craig, Promoter
Ticketmaster Canada: Patti-Anne Tarlton, Chief Operating Officer
Minutes
Transcript
Audio streams

April 29, 2014
Witnesses:
Cerberus Management and Consulting: Brian Hetherman, President
Quebecor Media Inc.: J. Serge Sasseville, Vice-President, Corporate and Institutional Affairs; Christian Breton, Vice-President, Music sector, Groupe Archambault
Polaris Music Prize: Steve Jordan, Founder and Executive Director
RBC Ottawa Bluesfest: Mark Monahan, Executive Director
Canadian Tourism Commission: Greg Klassen, President and Chief Executive Officer
Tourism Industry Association of Canada: David F. Goldstein, President and Chief Executive Officer
Minutes
Transcript
Audio stream

May 1, 2014
Witnesses:
Institut de la statistique du Québec:
Dominique Jutras, Director, Observatoire de la culture et des communications; Claude Fortier, Project Manager, Observatoire de la culture et des communications
Warner Music Canada:
Steven Kane, President
Nettwerk Music Group:
Simon Mortimer-Lamb, President and Chief Operating Officer
L’Équipe Spectra:
François Bissoondoyal, Director, Label; Roseline Rico, Vice-President, Governmental Affairs
Coup de coeur francophone:
Alain Chartrand, Executive and Artistic Director
Lula Lounge:
Jose Ortega, Co-Artistic Director, Lula Music and Arts Centre; Tracy Jenkins, Executive and Co-Artistic Director, Lula Music and Arts Centre
Notice of meeting
Transcript
Audio stream

May 6, 2014
Witnesses:
Canadian Independent Recording Artists’ Association: Zachary Leighton, Executive Director; Gregg Terrence, President
National Music Centre:
Andrew Mosker, President and Chief Executive Officer
Stingray Digital:
Eric Albert, Executive Vice-President; Mathieu Peloquin, Senior Vice-President Marketing and Communications
Google Canada:
Jason Kee, Counsel, Public Policy and Government Relations
Deezer:
Justin Erdman, Managing Director, Canada
Notice of meeting
Audio stream

May 8, 2014
Witnesses:
Quinlan Road Limited:
Loreena McKennitt, President; As individuals, Jim Vallance, Paul Hoffert
Mo’fat Management:
Stéphanie Moffatt, President; Mylène Fortier, Director, Marketing
Music NB
: Jean Surette, Executive Director; Richard Hornsby, Director of Music, University of New Brunswick
Manitoba Music:
Stephen Carroll, Board Member
Notice of meeting

Audio stream


May 13, 2014

Witnesses:
Foundation Assisting Canadian Talent on Recordings (FACTOR):
Susan Wheeler, Chair; Duncan McKie, President; Allison Outhit, Vice-President, Operation
Fondation Musicaction: Pierre Rodrigue, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Louise Chenail, Chief Executive Officer
Fonds RadioStar: François Bissoondoyal, Chairman of the Board of Directors; Louise Chenail, Chief Executive Officer
Music Canada: Graham Henderson, President
Radio Starmaker Fund: Sylvie Courtemanche, Chair of the Board; Chip Sutherland, Executive Director; Alan Doyle, Member of the Board
Canadian Music Week: Neill Dixon, President
Notice of meeting
Video stream

May 15, 2014

Drafting Instructions for a Report
Notice of meeting
Video stream

Comments

This website made possible with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.