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Tag archive: Stream ripping (2)

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IFPI releases Music Consumer Insight Report 2018, highlighting global trends in music listening habits

Today, IFPI released its 2018 Music Consumer Insight Report, an in-depth study of global music listening habits across 20 of the world’s largest music markets, including Canada, among music consumers aged 16-64.

“This year’s Music Consumer Insight Report tells the story of how recorded music is woven into the lives of fans around the world.  As it becomes increasingly accessible, it continues to be embraced across formats, genres and technologies,” said IFPI Chief Executive Frances Moore in a release. “Record companies are working with their partners to sustain and develop these rich and diverse ways in which music is being enjoyed, ensuring that it continues on its exciting journey around the world.”

One of the key highlights from the report is the ubiquity of on-demand streaming. 86% of consumers globally are listening to music through an audio or video on-demand service. 56% of listeners in Canada engage with music through on-demand audio services, just slightly below the global average of 61%.

Within this high usage of on-demand streaming though, it is user-upload services that continue to dominate consumption. The report notes that globally, 47% of time spent listening to on-demand music is on YouTube, compared to 28% on paid audio streaming services and 20% on free audio streaming.

Music piracy also remains a significant issue, as 38% of music consumers reported obtaining music through methods that infringe copyright. 32% of consumers report obtaining music through stream ripping, making it the most dominant form of copyright infringement.

“However, this report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face – both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said Moore. “Policymakers around the globe have been scrutinising these issues and increasingly acting to address them.”

Recent votes in the United States Senate and European Parliament have added even more urgency for Canadian policymakers to take similar action. Music Canada remains committed to working with the federal government to address the challenges hindering the proper functioning of our music marketplace, and to close the Value Gap in Canada.

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World’s largest music stream ripping website to cease operations globally following legal action

IFPI, in conjunction with the RIAA and BPI, announced today that following successful legal action from record companies in the United Kingdom and the United States, the world’s largest music stream ripping website will shut down.

YouTube-mp3.org, a Germany-based site with 60 million visitors a month, facilitated the ripping of downloadable music files from online audio-visual works. Sites like YouTube-mp3.org typically extract large profits from advertising while delivering nothing to music makers. IFPI estimates the site generated “hundreds of thousands of dollars in advertising revenue per month, often from major brands.” In addition to agreeing to cease operations, the site’s operator has agreed to not infringe the rights of artists and labels in the future.

“The largest site dedicated to the fastest growing form of music piracy is shutting down. This is welcome news for music creators and the fans that support them,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “Artists and advocates around the world are fighting for a better future for creators. As we continue to work with governments and legitimate music services to build a functioning ecosystem, it’s important that flagrant violations like stream ripping be met with firm action.”

In a joint release issued by IFPI, the RIAA and BPI, industry leaders welcomed the news:

“Stream ripping sites blatantly infringe the rights of record companies and artists,” said IFPI Chief Executive Frances Moore. “Today, music companies and licensed digital services work together to offer fans more options than ever before to listen to music legally, when and where they want to do so – hundreds of services with over 40 million tracks – all while compensating artists and labels. Stream ripping sites should not be allowed to jeopardise this and we will continue to take action against these sites.”

“This is a significant win for millions of music fans, as well as music creators and legitimate music services,” said Cary Sherman, Chairman and CEO, RIAA. “One of the world’s most egregious stream ripping sites has shuttered. Sites like these undermine the health of the legitimate marketplace and the livelihoods of millions of music creators worldwide. The swift and successful conclusion of this case should send an unmistakable signal to the operators of similar sites.” 

“This illegal site wasn’t just ripping streams, it was ripping off artists,” said Geoff Taylor, Chief Executive BPI. “Most fans understand that getting music from a genuine site supports the artists they love and allows labels to nurture the next generation of talent.  Music stands on the cusp of an exciting future in the streaming age, but only if we take resolute action against illegal businesses that try to siphon away its value.”

Piracy, and particularly stream ripping, remains a significant concern in Canada. A survey commissioned by IFPI in 2016 found that 27% of Canadian respondents reported pirating music, and 22% reported doing so via stream ripping. The age group most likely to use stream ripping sites was 16-24 year-olds, with 48% reporting doing so in the past year. While Youtube-mp3.org was the largest stream ripping site, the industry hope is that this legal action will send a clear message to other sites still in operation that they are breaking the law, and will face similar action if they do not shut down.

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