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New research from SOCAN provides more evidence for the value of Music Cities strategies

The results of a new survey commissioned by SOCAN provide new evidence to support the development of Music City strategies, like those detailed in Music Canada’s landmark study, The Mastering of a Music City.

The SOCAN study titled Live Music & Urban Canadians confirms that most Canadians living in urban centres think it is important to live in a neighbourhood “with a vibrant local arts scene that includes live music” and support a portion of funds from new property developments going to community arts and culture developments.

Some details of the survey were initially shared in an opinion piece for the Toronto Star by SOCAN’s CEO Eric Baptiste titled Cities can create conditions for live music to thrive. The article was followed by another release expanding on the results of the survey and proposing ways that municipalities and music fans can support live music.

Results from SOCAN’s research include:

  • “Nearly two-thirds (63%) of urban Canadians agree that it is important to live in a neighbourhood with a vibrant arts scene that includes live music.”

Respondents with a university degree (71%) were more likely to agree with this sentiment versus those with a college (58%) or high school (49%) education. Urban residents in Atlantic Canada (74%) were also most in agreement versus residents in other parts of Canada, followed by Quebec (68%), British Columbia (67%), Ontario (63%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (54%) and Alberta (50%).

  • “The vast majority (80%) of urban Canadians would support a portion of funds going to community arts & culture developments.”

SOCAN’s survey stated that “currently new property developers in some municipalities are required to put a portion of funds towards community development, city parks, etc,” and asked respondents whether they would support a portion of these funds being put towards arts & culture developments like live music venues and local theatres.

Urban Canadians who agreed that living in a neighbourhood with a vibrant arts and live music scene was important to them were significantly more likely to agree (91%) that development fees should support arts & culture developments than those who did not agree (62%).

  • “Roughly half (49%) of urban Canadians would enjoy owning and living in a condo that offered live music in the lobby.”

SOCAN’s survey noted that many condos in the US and Europe have restaurants and bars in their lobbies. Of the urban Canadians who responded that they would enjoy live music in their lobby, young Canadians aged 18-34 were most likely to agree (66%) and respondents living in Quebec were less likely to agree (39%) than Canadian outside of Quebec (55%).

As noted in The Mastering of a Music City, music can play a powerful role in city brand building, and also in attracting and retaining talent and investment in a city’s broader economy. In a world where talent is highly mobile, some cities are focusing on the vibrancy of their music and arts scene as a way to stand out from the competition. SOCAN’s research adds further evidence to support this observation.

Access to the spaces and places in which music can be made – from education to rehearsal to recording to performance – is also one of the seven key strategies to grow and strengthen a local music economy identified in The Mastering of a Music City.

But the relationship between residential buildings and these spaces, including live music venues, rehearsal spaces, and arts hubs, is one in which cities across the world are attempting to strike the right balance. New residential developments have, in some cases, been developed on properties formerly occupied by live venues or community arts hubs. Other venues have been threatened by rising rents, property values and taxes that do not consider the social value of these cultural spaces.

What tools are at a city’s disposal that might be, given SOCAN’s research, supported by urban Canadians?

401 Richmond, a live-work community arts hub in Toronto, was recently confronted with a property tax increase that threatened its closure. Recognizing the cultural significance of venues such as 401 Richmond, the Province of Ontario announced it was prepared to, in conjunction with the City, develop a new tax class for heritage properties.

Toronto City Councillor Joe Cressy then brought a successful motion to council to formally begin the process of establishing “Toronto’s new Culture and Creative property tax sub-class.”

Another tool adopted by cities like Melbourne, San Francisco, Montreal and London is the Agent of Change principle in land use planning. The Mastering of a Music City describes the principle as such:

“The Agent of Change Principle determines which party is required to adopt noise mitigation measures in situations of mixed land use. If the ‘agent of change’ is a new apartment building that is being built near a pre-existing music venue, the apartment building is responsible for sound attenuation. On the other hand, if the music venue is undergoing renovations and therefore is the ‘agent of change’ in the neighbourhood, it is responsible for noise mitigation.”

In Toronto, while various measures are under consideration and review, the City’s Film & Entertainment Industries’ Music Unit can now add comments to applications circulated by the Planning Division for any new development within 120 metres of an existing live music venue so that staff can identify any potential conflicts and make recommendations.

These and other policies, like reviewing noise bylaws, can go a long way in allowing live music venues and residential properties to coexist, facilitating the conditions for the vibrant arts and cultural communities that SOCAN’s research has shown are important to nearly two-thirds of urban Canadians.

This research comes as regions across Canada, including London, Vancouver, Hamilton, Windsor-Essex, Moncton, Ottawa, Barrie-Simcoe County, and more have implemented or are considering strategies to better support and grow their music ecosystems. SOCAN’s new findings provide even more evidence for the value in municipal strategies that create the environment for music ecosystems to flourish.

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Leading Canadian copyright lawyer says “support for Canada’s content creators is imperative” in Globe and Mail op-ed

Barry Sookman, one of Canada’s leading copyright lawyers, wrote an op-ed published in The Globe and Mail on January 18, addressing two of the major challenges facing the cultural industries in Canada: pirate streaming and the Value Gap. The piece was later posted in its full, unedited length on Sookman’s personal website.

Sookman says that “our outdated legal frameworks” are a significant contributing cause of these challenges. He references Music Canada’s 2017 report The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-In-Canada Approach, which shows that “the market value of music in Canada is still a fraction of what it once was, and equitable remuneration for access to music remains elusive.”

The report defines the Value Gap as the “significant disparity between the value of creative content that is accessed and enjoyed by consumers, and the revenues that are returned to the people and businesses who create it.”

As Sookman points out, the Value Gap is not only a problem for music creators. He says that most of Canada’s leading cultural industries are also affected, including journalism, television and film.

A coalition of author and publisher groups have documented the harm caused by the Value Gap to their sector, and in 2017 launched the I Value Canadian Stories campaign to urge Canadian lawmakers to “restore balance between the need to compensate our creators for educational copying and the need to promote access to quality content.” The campaign website notes that royalties to creators and publishers for copying of their works have declined by 80% since 2013.

Sookman concludes that, given the magnitude of this problem and the threat to Canada’s cultural industries, the issue, as well as practical solutions, “deserve the attention and support of Canadians.”

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A series of recommendations from Toronto Music Advisory Council are one step closer to policy after Economic Development Committee approval

Members of Toronto’s Economic Development Committee passed a suite of Toronto Music Advisory Council (TMAC) recommendations today aimed at providing better support for the city’s live music venues, and facilitating the collection of data for an international study on night time economies.

Toronto’s Economic Development Committee is composed of councillors Fragedakis, Grimes, Hart, Holland, Kelly and Thompson (Chair), many of whom spoke passionately about the value of music and culture to the city’s identity and well-being, as well as music’s significant contribution to the local economy.

“Life without music, life without culture, would be no life,” said Committee Chair Michael Thompson, Councilor for Ward 37 (Scarborough Centre) and former TMAC Co-Chair.

Spencer Sutherland, current Co-Chair of TMAC, owner of Toronto music venue Nocturne and Chairman of the Queen West Business Improvement Area, gave a deputation at the meeting thanking the Committee and Council for its support thus far, and speaking to the progress TMAC has made to reach these recommendations.

Many of the recommendations were specifically created to address the challenges that live music venues face, like rising property taxes, as well as licensing and other logistical challenges. A sense of urgency to address the situation for venues came to a fever pitch in 2017.

“As you might recall at the same time last year our city was facing an unprecedented crisis of music venues closing at an alarming rate of one per week,” said Sutherland. “Thankfully, so far this year we have seen none of that.”

Later in the meeting Josh Colle, Councillor for Ward 15 (Eglinton-Lawrence) and TMAC Co-Chair, said the story that is not often told is about venues opening or re-opening, such as Hugh’s Room and The Hideout. Colle praised the work of TMAC, and specifically the venue sustainability working group, which he said “really lit a fire” under councillors to act to provide better protection and support for live music.

The agenda item up for consideration was titled “Night-time Economy – Collection of Data and Protection of Live Music Venues,” and recommendations made to the Committee by the TMAC were divided into two categories.

The first related to an international study of the night time economy being conducted by the Responsible Hospitality Institute examining effective and sustainable models for night time economy management.  TMAC requested that the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, in collaboration with the Director, Office of Emergency Management and the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, facilitate the collection of accurate data by the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas (TABIA) to contribute to the international study.

Cities around the globe are examining various policies to best support their night time economies, and some cities, such as Amsterdam and New York, have appointed a Night Mayor to represent the businesses and cultures that thrive outside of the nine-to-five. In a 2016 Huffington Post blog, Music Canada’s Executive Vice President Amy Terrill asked “Does Toronto need a Night Mayor?”

Councillor Thompson noted that Toronto is paying attention to initiatives in other cities, including New York and London, and felt the City could do more to maximize the potential of its night time economy. “There are many things that are taking place and in a city like ours – it never sleeps,” Thompson told the Committee. “People sleep at individual times but the city itself is always alive and vibrant.”

The second recommendation from TMAC was all about live music and was made up of a suite of nine recommendations included in a previously requested report on protecting live music venues in Toronto. The General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, was asked to consider the following:

  1. Create tax benefits for local live music venues.
  2. Initiate and expand music pilot programs including ideas for artist tour bus parking, musician load in/out zones and artist poster zones.
  3. Create a music venue certification program.
  4. Amend zoning and licensing to protect existing venues and encourage new ones including a clarification of what business license music venues require.
  5. Create a panel, consisting of a member of the Film and Entertainment Office, members of the Live Working Group, and senior members of planning, building and licensing, with regard to providing advice to individuals and/or organizations wishing to establish new and/or grow existing live music venues.
  6. Review Municipal Licensing Regulations governing parks, green spaces, and city owned outdoor venues.
  7. Support Night-time Economy initiatives with The Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas (TABIA) and Responsible Hospitality Institute (RHI).
  8. Financial support for an economic impact study of local live music venues.
  9. Financial support for a local Music Passport event series.

All recommendations in the agenda item passed with the support of the Economic Development Committee and will now be brought to Toronto City Council at a yet to be determined date.

“I hope that these suggestions are embraced and supported by Committee and then by Council,” commented Councillor Colle. “I hope we see the continuation of what I think is – well, what the challenge is – the healthiest and most robust Music City in the world.”

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Brian Robertson, long-time President of the Canadian Recording Industry Association, appointed to the Order of Canada

On December 29, 2017, Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, the Governor General of Canada, announced 125 new appointments to the Order of Canada.

Among those appointments is Brian Robertson, former long-time President of CRIA (The Canadian Recording Industry Association), which became Music Canada in July of 2011.

“We at Music Canada would like to offer our sincere congratulations to all of the new appointees to the Order of Canada,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “And specifically to Mr. Robertson, I would like to congratulate and thank him for his 30 years of service at CRIA, as well as his passion for the Canadian music industry and celebrating our country’s incredibly talented and diverse performing artists.”

Brian Robertson served as President of CRIA from 1974 to 2004. During his tenure at the organization, he is also credited as one of the founders of the Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS), which administers the JUNO Awards, where he also served as President from 1978 to 1983, and as Executive Producer of the nationally televised JUNOs broadcast for eight years.

Mr. Robertson is also the co-creator of the Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards, which acknowledges lifetimes of achievement in the performing arts and showcases the top Canadian performing artists in both official languages. Robertson also served as President of the Audio-Video Licensing Agency (now CONNECT Music Licensing), governor of the Corporation of Roy Thomson Hall and Massey Hall, was a member of the Dean’s Committee at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Music, and honourary chair of the Regent Park inner-city music school.

His dedication to the arts in Canada extends far beyond music. Mr. Robertson is regarded as one of Canada’s most prolific television, theatre and special events producers. In addition to his JUNOs broadcast achievements, he served as Executive Producer for the CBC’s Royal Canadian Air Farce, co-produced the nationally televised Golden Jubilee Gala for Queen Elizabeth II at Roy Thomson Hall in 2002, and has acted as executive producer of numerous theatrical productions in Canada.

Other music-related appointments announced on December 29 include Jann Arden, Valerie Tryon, Jay Switzer, William Shatner, Alain Caron, Oliver Gannon and Gordon Stobbe. FYI Music News has published a brief run-down of the musical accomplishments of the new appointees.

The Order of Canada is one of the country’s highest civilian honours, recognizing “outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation.” Congratulations to all of the new appointees!

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Applications for the PASSPORT: Music Export Summit are now open

Canadian self-managed artists, artist managers, and music company entrepreneurs active in artist management have until December 15, 2017, to apply for the PASSPORT: Music Export Summit, a new program designed to prepare export-ready artists and entrepreneurs with training in business skills and artistic product development.

The program will begin with parallel East and West summits. The Music Export Summit West will take place in Winnipeg from February 21-25, 2018, and will also include a stream for Indigenous artists and companies. The Music Export Summit East will take place in Halifax from February 28 to March 4, 2018.

The PASSPORT website provides the following training overview:

  1. Importance and value of export for the Canadian music industry
  2. The challenges and opportunities of the global release landscape
  3. Market intelligence and specifics for target markets (UK, EU, USA)
  4. Developing an export marketing plan

Selected participants from these initial sessions will be chosen to attend a follow-up Masterclass event from April 8-12, 2018, at the National Music Centre in Calgary, in which they will conduct follow-ups on their export plans and create media assets for international marketing. The Masterclass will also include streamed live performances.

The eligibility guidelines on the PASSPORT website state that “Submissions will be accepted from export-ready artists and artist managers who are preparing for market development and export activities. Participants will have made initial inroads into international markets or are preparing for their first international showcase festival or tour in the coming 6-18 months. Participants will have taken part in foundational business training through their provincial music industry association, Canada’s Music Incubator, or regional music conferences, and have experience with basic administrative and music marketing tasks.”

The PASSPORT: Music Export Summit is produced by Manitoba Music in partnership with Music Nova ScotiaCanada’s Music Incubator, and the National Music Centre, and the project is funded in part by FACTOR, the Government of Canada and Canada’s private radio broadcasters.

For more information on eligibility, scheduling, and to apply, visit the PASSPORT: Music Export Summit website.

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Music PEI has announced the nominees for the 2018 Music PEI Awards

Earlier this week, Music PEI announced the nominees for the 2018 Music PEI Awards, to be presented during Credit Union Music PEI Week (January 25-28, 2018).

The Music PEI Awards Party, where the majority of the awards will be presented, is taking place Sunday, January 28 at the Rodd Charlottetown Hotel Ballroom (75 Kent St, Charlottetown).

The nominees and other PEI artists will be showcased at multiple events during Credit Union Music PEI Week, including the SOCAN Songwriter of the Year Concert, Music Mosaic and the Closing Concert, as well as events on January 26 and 27 at Baba’s Lounge, Hunter’s Ale House, The Pour House, The Old Triangle, and Fishbones Oyster Bar. Performer details for these events will be announced in December.

“I would encourage everyone to come out to support our local artists as we celebrate their success and achievements,” said Jennifer Campbell, President of Music PEI in a release. “The awards are often an important stepping stone as our artists develop their careers and public support is crucial to that development.”

Prince Edward Island musicians The East Pointers, Ashley Condon, and the duo of Dennis Ellsworth & Kinley Dowling lead this year’s nominees, each with nominations in six categories.

“As we’ve come to expect…the nominees for the 2018 Music PEI Awards include well known Island artists who perform regularly here on Prince Edward Island and many of whom tour the world,” said Doug Bridges, Marketing and Communications Officer with the Provincial Credit Union. “At the same time the nominees include a number of emerging artists, and we look forward to supporting them and watching their careers develop in the years to come.”

About half of the awards are decided by member voting and half are decided by a jury.

Here is the full list of 2018 Music PEI Awards nominees:

Album of the Year
● Catherine MacLellan “If It’s Alright With You – The Songs of Gene MacLellan”
● The East Pointers “What We Leave Behind”
● Dennis Ellsworth & Kinley Dowling “Everyone Needs to Chill Out”
● Liam Corcoran “Nevahland”
● Ashley Condon “Can You Hear Me”

Country Recording of the Year
● Danny Drouin “It’s Been A Long Week”
● Marcella Richard “Marcella Richard Sings Roy MacCaull”
● Small Town Jokurs “Our Little Piece of Heaven”

Female Solo Recording of the Year
● Alicia Toner “I Learned The Hard Way”
● Ashley Condon “Can You Hear Me”
● Catherine MacLellan “If It’s Alright With You – The Songs of Gene MacLellan”
● Marcella Richard “Marcella Richard Sings Roy MacCaull”

Group Recording of the Year
● Amanda Jackson Band “Fire in the Blue”
● Dennis Ellsworth & Kinley Dowling “Everyone Needs to Chill Out”
● The East Pointers “What We Leave Behind”
● Stabbing Joy “Loved It More Than You Could Ever Know”
● Small Town Jokurs “Our Little Piece of Heaven”

New Artist of the Year

● Alicia Toner I Learned The Hard Way
● Dennis Ellsworth & Kinley Dowling Everyone Needs To Chill Out
● Amanda Jackson Band Fire In The Blue
● Aaron Hastelow Aaron Hastelow
● Stabbing Joy Loved It More Than You Could Ever Know

Male Solo Recording of the Year
● Liam Corcoran Nevahland
● Rick Sparkes Dirty, Little Love Songs
● Element & Broadbent Safe Spaces
● Danny Drouin It’s Been a Long Week
● Aaron Hastelow Aaron Hastelow

Pop Recording of the Year
● Aaron Hastelow “Aaron Hastelow”
● Liam Corcoran “Nevahland”
● Stabbing Joy “Loved It More Than You Could Ever Know ”

Urban Recording of the Year
● Amanda Jackson Band “Fire in the Blue”
● Element & Broadbent “Safe Spaces”
● Norm Strangely “Owlephant”

Roots Contemporary Recording of the Year
● Catherine MacLellan If It’s Alright With You – The Songs of Gene MacLellan
● The East Pointers What We Leave Behind
● Ashley Condon Can You Hear Me
● Alicia Toner I Learned The Hard Way
● Dennis Ellsworth & Kinley Dowling Everyone Needs To Chill Out

SOCAN Songwriter of the Year
● Dennis Ellsworth & Kinley Dowling “Panorama High”
● Nick Doneff “Old Dog”
● Ashley Condon “Oh MY Love”
● Alicia Toner “Back to Fine”
● Liam Corcoran “Tick Tock”

Song of the Year
• The East Pointers “Two Weeks”
• Nick Doneff “Old Dog”
• Ashley Condon “Oh My Love”
• Dennis Ellsworth & Kinley Dowling “Panorama High”
• Liam Corcoran “Tick Tock”
• Calm Baretta “Chilly Bones”

Entertainer of the Year (Publicly Voted Award hosted on the Bell Aliant Website)
● The East Pointers
● Dylan Menzie
● Ashley Condon
● Catherine MacLellan
● The Royal North

Event of the Year
● Cavendish Beach Music Festival
● Mont-Carmel Summer Concert Series
● PEI Mutual Festival of Small Halls

Producer of the Year
● Andrew A Melzer
● Jon Matthews
● Brent Chaisson

Touring Artist of the Year
● Catherine MacLellan
● Dylan Menzie
● The East Pointers

Video of the Year
● Alicia Toner “I Learned the Hard Way”
● Nick Doneff “Old Dog”
● Norm Strangely “Autismatic”
● Rick Sparkes “Western Wind”

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Miranda Mulholland and 100 fellow creators call for real and meaningful reform to the Copyright Board of Canada

In August of 2017, Canada’s Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister, Navdeep Bains, in conjunction with Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, announced the launch of consultations on reforming the Copyright Board of Canada. According to the government’s release, the goal of Copyright Board reform is to “enable creators to get paid properly and on time.”

Miranda Mulholland is a violinist, singer, label owner, and the recipient of Music Canada’s inaugural Artist Advocate Award for her outstanding achievements in advocating for the rights and livelihoods of music creators. One of those achievements is becoming the first creator to deliver a keynote address to the Economic Club of Canada. Another is rallying her fellow musicians on the importance of reforming the Copyright Board and her submission of two letters to the Canadian government.

The first letter was submitted on behalf of “Canadian musicians, independent label owners and creative entrepreneurs – at all stages of their careers” 100 of whom added their names. The letter states “While only part of our income comes from royalties collected by collective societies, the rates set by the Board directly impact the value of our music, and our ability to earn a living from it.” The letter specifically supports three options outlined in the consultation’s Discussion Paper and points out that while the role of the Board has evolved, “at the end of the day, the Board is valuing our work, and setting rates that affect our livelihoods.”

The second letter was submitted to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and in addition to the list of supporting names, is signed directly by Mulholland, Jim Cuddy, Alan Doyle and Joel Plaskett. It stresses the need for real and meaningful change at the Board, calling for tariffs to be set faster and more in line with market values, and also thanks the government for embarking on the long overdue reform process.

You can read Miranda’s letters below, which are also available on the advocacy section of her website.

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Media Advisory: Where would Google be without creators and the distortion of copyright protections?

Toronto, Nov. 2, 2017: In a ground-breaking report, Music Canada, a national trade organization, documents the scale of harm being caused by the Value Gap – defined as the significant disparity between the value of creative content that is accessed, particularly through user upload content services like YouTube, and the revenues returned to the people and businesses who create it.

“This is the story you will not hear from Google,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada.  “YouTube would never have emerged as the largest music service without distorting the use of safe harbour protections in copyright law that were created to protect ‘mere conduits’ or ‘dumb pipes.’  We now know that today’s digital platforms are the smartest pipes that have ever been imagined.”

Creators and governments around the world are taking notice, and taking action. In Canada, thousands of musicians, authors, poets, visual artists, playwrights and other members of the creative class, have urged the Canadian government to address the Value Gap in a campaign called Focus On Creators.

The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach is available for download at https://musiccanada.com/resources/research/the-value-gap-report/.

Interviews are available at request.

– 30 –

For more information please contact:

Corey Poole
Communications Coordinator
Music Canada
647-808-7359

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Feedback sought for Barrie-Simcoe Music Strategy

A new music strategy is being developed for Simcoe County in partnership between Regional Tourism Organization 7, Simcoe County, City of Barrie, City of Orillia, Town of Collingwood and MusicCO.

The announcement that funding has been secured to develop a 3-year music strategy for Barrie & Simcoe County (including Collingwood, Orillia, and many other municipalities) was made at Staying in Tune, a music summit hosted by the City of Barrie and MusicCO on October 24.

To inform the strategy, Nordicity and CultureCap are conducting a survey to gather as much information as possible about the regional music scene, and the two organizations have also been engaged to produce the final report.

Feedback is being sought from songwriters, musicians, venues, festivals, studios, record companies, fans and everyone else involved in the Simcoe County music industry. The survey website states that they would like opinions on:

  • What’s great about the local music scene, and what could be better.
  • How are you involved in the music scene? We’re gathering detailed statistics to better inform decision-making and illustrate all the activity out there.
  • Most of all, we’re looking for fresh thinking about how to make Simcoe County a better place for music!

To complete the survey, visit the Barrie-Simcoe Music Strategy survey website. For additional information or questions, you can email simcoemusic@culturecap.ca

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Playback 2017: Music Canada President’s Award presented to Cory Crossman and Chris Campbell

The Music Canada President’s Award is presented to an individual working outside the music community who displays a deep passion for music and the people who make it.

The recent past has been filled with many firsts and milestones for music in London, Ontario. The city hosted an incredibly successful Country Music Week and the CCMA Awards in September 2016; completed its first ever music census; has taken steps to modernize noise bylaws for music and dancing on outdoor patios; and on November 17, will host its first Music Career Day. Credit for these outstanding accomplishments is due not only to one individual, but two passionate community leaders.

At Playback 2017, Music Canada’s annual industry dialogue and celebration, London’s Music Industry Development Officer, Cory Crossman, and Chris Campbell, Director of Culture and Entertainment Tourism at Tourism London, were both presented with the 2017 President’s Award for their incredible commitment to making London a Music City.

The first ever President’s Award was presented to Mark Garner, Executive Director of Downtown Yonge BIA in 2015.

Watch below as Chris Campbell and Cory Crossman accept their awards, presented by Music Canada’s President and CEO, Graham Henderson.

News of the award presentation received cheers and praise on social media.

https://twitter.com/_woodbethany/status/920702993896321024

Below is a selection of photos from the award presentation.

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