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Music Canada and Member Labels Announce MusiCounts Scholarship in honour of Deane Cameron

Earlier this year, the music industry lost Deane Cameron, former President of EMI Music Canada and a true changemaker who had an indelible effect on our industry. In memory of Deane, Music Canada, with the support of our member labels Warner, Sony, and Universal, is proud to announce a new MusiCounts scholarship in his honour. 

The scholarship will give aspiring professionals the connections, skills, and resources needed to jump start their career in music. The Scholarship is intended for young professionals who are completing post-secondary studies in the areas of music performance, music business, or music production, and who plan to enter the workforce within the next 12 months. 

The announcement was made today at Music Canada’s 2019 Symposium, by Steve Kane, President of Warner Music Canada, and Jeffrey Remedios, President of Universal Music Canada. Shane Carter, President of Sony Music Canada, would also have been part of the announcement, but was unable to attend due to travel. 

Reflecting Deane’s long standing support for Indigenous communities and programs, $15,000 has been pledged to the MusiCounts Scholarship Program, which will ensure that three Indigenous youth will receive a MusiCounts Scholarship in 2020. MusiCounts’ new partnership with Indspire will allow MusiCounts to identify Indigenous youth in Canada who will benefit most from this unique scholarship program. 

“Deane Cameron was a titan of our industry – a passionate and proud supporter of Canadian music, a staunch advocate for creators, and an inspirational leader,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “He was a mentor for so many in the music business, and an esteemed member of our board for 24 years. Through the support of our members – Sony, Universal, and Warner – we honour his enduring legacy though this scholarship.”

For full details on MusiCounts’ Scholarship programs, visit https://musicounts.ca/programs-overview/scholarships/.

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Susan Marjetti recognized with Music Canada’s President’s Award

Music Canada is proud to present Susan Marjetti, Executive Director of CBC Radio and Audio, with the Music Canada President’s Award. This award is given to an individual outside the confines of the recorded music label community who has exhibited a deep passion for music, and who has had an enduring impact on the wider industry.

Marjetti’s role at CBC includes oversight of CBC Music, CBC Talk, CBC Podcasts, and most recently, the new CBC Listen, which is a consolidated digital audio offering that includes all of CBC’s audio content from music playlists to podcasts. All of these platforms are doing incredible work to amplify the talent of great Canadian artists.

She has spent nearly four decades working in radio stations, from small to complex organizations, in various parts of Canada. Prior to taking over the reins at the network, Susan managed CBC Toronto and the Ontario region where she, and her team, worked to make the public broadcaster more relevant to these fast-paced cities, and an ever-changing province.

“I’m deeply touched by this recognition. Like all of you, music has been such a big part of my life,” says Susan Marjetti. “Music has the power to connect us. To reflect us. To engage and entertain us. It matters deeply. And Canada just wouldn’t be the same without our music and the people who make it. At CBC Music, we aspire to celebrate and honour that every day.”

Susan’s leadership in diversity and inclusion has also been recognized numerous times, including recognition with a Harry Jerome Award, Ryerson’s Wall of Fame, and the Rosalie Award.

The award was presented today at Music Canada’s 2019 Symposium. Marjetti is the fourth recipient of the Music Canada’s President’s Award; previous recipients include Mark Garner, Cory Crossman and Chris Campbell, and Josh Colle.

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Music Canada welcomes Farah Mohamed to its Board of Directors

Music Canada is proud to announce that Farah Mohamed has been elected an independent Director to the organization’s Board, effective immediately. Mohamed, who also serves as the Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, Policy & Public Affairs of the Toronto Region Board of Trade, brings a wealth of experience and insight to our organization. 

A social profit entrepreneur, Farah has worked tirelessly to engage the private sector, and government leaders, in a way that makes economic sense, to better address some of the most pressing issues facing our generation. 

In her prior role as the CEO of the Malala Fund, Farah advocated for resources and policy changes needed to give all girls a secondary education, investing in developing country educators and activists, and amplifying the voices of girls fighting for change. The fund invests in the future of girls and women with more than $8.6 million towards girls’ education programmes.

And as the founder of G(irls)20, Farah structured the globally active social enterprise in a manner similar to the G20, putting girls and women at the very heart of the organization and its advocacy.  G(irls)20 cultivates a new generation of female leaders through education, entrepreneurship and global experiences. It and its young female delegates provide advice to G20 Leaders on how to increase female labour force participation and how to economically engage girls and women to reach growth targets and through a new program, Canadian girls are trained, mentored, matched and place on a not for profit board.

As well, Farah was recruited by Canadian businesswoman and former MP Belinda Stronach to establish The Belinda Stronach Foundation (TBSF). Under Farah’s leadership, TBSF created and launched the Foundation’s flagship programs, including One Laptop Per Child for Aboriginal youth. She also oversaw the Foundation’s work in Liberia and a $1M humanitarian relief effort in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

Of Indian heritage, Farah was born and raised in Uganda before her family was uprooted and sought refuge in Canada. Her upbringing instilled her with a strong work ethic and keen sense of curiosity, which eventually culminated in her working in politics. For 10 years, Farah worked closely with some of Canada’s most senior politicians including Paddy Torsney and Anne McLellan. Post politics, Farah served as Vice President, Public Affairs and Community Engagement for VON Canada where she was successful in building government and private sector partnerships.

“I’m thrilled to be elected as an independent Director to Music Canada’s Board and to support their mandate as an agent of change and a thought leader within the music community. I’m also excited to continue to be able to work to engage all players across the music industry, from the private sector to government leaders, so that we can better address some of the most pressing issues facing our generation.” said Farah Mohamed.

“With today’s election of Farah Mohamed, the Music Canada Board gains incredible expertise in strategic partnerships, global to local government relations, and devising and executing innovative approaches to problem solving,” says Graham Henderson, President & CEO of Music Canada. “Farah’s election, together with last April’s election of independent Board Chair Jennifer Sloan, brings new insights and acumen to Music Canada’s Board – further elevating our organization.”

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Gil Moore presented with Music Canada’s Artist Advocate Award

Music Canada is honoured to present Gil Moore, founding member of the multi-Platinum-certified band Triumph, and owner of the renowned Metalworks Studios in Mississauga, Ontario, as the recipient of the 2019 Artist Advocate Award. The award recognizes musicians and songwriters for their outstanding advocacy efforts to improve the livelihoods of music creators. The Mississauga-based musician has been active in the Canadian music industry for more than 40 years, with advocacy being a consistent theme throughout his career. 

Moore has long been a champion for policies to help support music creators and to improve the music ecosystem. He was an active voice for copyright reform as a board member of Balanced Copyright for Canada, a coalition of content creators, artists, and rights holders, and people who work in the creative industries, which advocated for copyright legislation that effectively protects artists and creators, later passed within the Copyright Modernization Act

Moore shared his passion for creators’ rights with his students at Metalworks Institute, and has invited Music Canada in to present town hall sessions on topics such as the Copyright Board. He also opened the warehouse of Metalworks Production Group for tours, allowing Music Canada to showcase the skilled workers and economic impact of the live music sector to policymakers in advocating for the Ontario Music Fund. 

“I’m very proud to receive this award today,” says Gil Moore. “But awards are not the reason I became an artist advocate – I am an advocate for music because I have seen firsthand how it can change lives. I’ve seen that in my own career as a performer, I’ve seen it with fans who are so passionate about the artists they love, and I’ve seen it with our students at Metalworks, who get into this business and invest in their careers because they love music and they are driven to succeed in this industry. I’ve also seen the way that music can empower a community, create jobs, and drive economic growth – and that is worth advocating for. Thank you to Graham and Music Canada for this recognition, and your continued efforts to grow the music sector.” 

Moore has also been active in advocacy as the Vice President of the Canadian Association for the Advancement of Music & the Arts (CAAMA). He served previously as an Executive Board member of the Toronto Musician’s Association and also as a Vice President of The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS). 

Gil was an inaugural inductee of the Mississauga Music Walk of Fame for his personal involvement in and contributions to the community. Over the past few years, along with the other members of Triumph, Gil has been inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, Mississauga’s Legend’s Row, the Canadian Music & Broadcast Industry Hall of Fame and the City of Mississauga named a street in the band’s honour, Triumph Lane. His passion for Metalworks and the music industry is boundless; he devotes much of his time to researching trends in music education and technology.

“Gil Moore has put Mississauga’s music scene on the map. We are eternally grateful for his efforts and pride he has brought to our City,” said Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “Gil consistently champions the power of music for job creation and growth, and as a member of our Economic Development Advisory Board, he has been instrumental in the creation of the first full-time music industry position at City Hall focused on music sector development. He possesses an encyclopedic knowledge of local music history, which he urges us all to recognize, preserve and celebrate. Because of his passion for music education and the founding of Metalworks Institute, Mississauga produces some of the world’s top musicians, sound technicians, and event experts. We are proud and lucky to have Gil in Mississauga.”

The award was presented today at Music Canada’s 2019 Symposium, taking place at the Great Hall in Toronto. Moore becomes the third recipient of the Artist Advocate Award; previous recipients include Loreena McKennitt and Miranda Mulholland

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Mind the (Value) Gap – Miranda Mulholland and Music Canada’s Graham Henderson appear on the Musonomics podcast

On the latest episode of the popular podcast Musonomics, Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson, along with Miranda Mulholland, artist, label owner, festival founder and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council, spoke with host Larry Miller about some of the major issues affecting the music industry today.

Musonomics is a twice-monthly podcast about the business of the music and culture industries. Hosted by Larry Miller and produced with support from the NYU Steinhardt Music Business Program, the program uses data, music and interviews with newsmakers and analysts to provide insight into what’s happening now — and what’s coming next in the world of music and beyond. 

In the podcast, Miller explores data contained in IFPI’s recent ‘Music Listening 2019’ report, which provides a comprehensive overview of music consumption trends from around the world. As Miller notes, global music listening continues to rise, with respondents reporting their listening habits being up to 18 hours per week. Engagement with audio streaming services also remains strong, with 64% of all respondents using a streaming service in the past month. 

Troublingly, the report also highlights the growing scale of listening via user-upload services – the greatest contributor to the Value Gap. Indeed, 77% of respondents reported using YouTube for music listening in the last music; globally, on-demand consumption via video streaming totalled 47%, dwarfing paid and ad-supported audio streaming services. The episode, entitled Mind the (Value) Gap, explores this very issue – a phenomenon that IFPI has called the biggest threat to the future sustainability of the music industry. 

During the episode, Henderson touches on the origin of the issue, describing the Value Gap as the result of a failure of legislation to keep pace with the changes in technology. The impact of this phenomenon has created a widening gulf between the growing revenues that platforms and user-upload services like YouTube gain from the existence of music on their services, and the value returned to the artists and labels who created and developed this creative content.

Henderson also outlines how outdated exemptions such as broad safe-harbour laws have prevented copyright creators and owners from being able to ensure that their work is not being commercialized without their consent by digital and online services. Indeed, as Mulholland vividly describes during the episode, no group has been as adversely affected by the Value Gap as artists.

Mulholland goes on to speak about the realities of working as an artist working within a framework where it is almost impossible to obtain fair remuneration for the monetization of one’s work on online platforms such as YouTube. She outlines how exemptions within Canadian copyright legislation has created this system: where musicians are effectively subsidizing technology companies, while – at the same time – receiving royalty payouts that are too meagre to subsist on alone.

To hear the rest of this fascinating discussion, you can find the episode on Apple Podcasts, SoundCloud, and other major podcasting services. 

Larry Miller will also be delivering a keynote address at Music Canada’s 2019 Symposium, taking place on Wednesday October 23rd. In his address, Miller will share insights from his 2019 report, Same Heart. New Beat. How Record Labels Amplify Talent in the Modern Music Marketplace, which examines the partnerships between record companies and artists. In particular, it outlines the evolution of label efforts to discover and market musical artists; how marketing plans differ and enhance opportunities for artists in a streaming world; the increasing role of data in label strategies; approaches undertaken by labels to build artist branding, and more. Miller will also reconnect with Mulholland and Henderson in a fireside chat following his keynote. 

 

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SHAED receive first Canadian Gold plaque in Toronto

Photo Credit: Universal Music Canada

Prior to their highly anticipated show at Toronto’s Velvet Underground, American electro-pop trio SHAED were presented with a Canadian Gold Single Award plaque by Universal Music Canada for their breakthrough hit “Trampoline.” Initially released in 2018, the song has since been re-released in 2019 with vocals from Multi-Platinum artist ZAYN.

Watch the music video for “Trampoline” below.

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New Noise Bylaw illustrates City of Toronto’s commitment to supporting a vibrant music ecosystem through clear, objective standards

New bylaw procedures have been implemented by the City of Toronto to provide clearer standards regarding noise in the city. Bylaw amendments include a number of changes relating to amplified sound’ that have positive implications for the live music ecosystem, and provide clearer communication from the City to venue owners. These substantial amendments flow from an extensive research and consultation process led by the City of Toronto’s Municipal Licensing and Standards (MLS).

Music Canada applauds the City’s amendments to the bylaw, which signify a positive step forward, and demonstrate that the music community was a meaningful stakeholder in the deliberation process. As described in our groundbreaking report The Mastering of a Music City, it is critical for cities to implement measures that support the growth of a robust music economy. 

These amendments better recognize the crucial role the live music sector plays in making Toronto a vibrant and inclusive Music City. They also demonstrate the value the City sees in the live music industry, its impact on our local economy, and what it means for the improved quality of life for those living in Toronto and the surrounding area. In addition to the elimination of the old Noise Bylaw’s ‘general prohibition’ (which stated that “no one shall produce noise that disturbs anyone else, day or night”), the updated policies contain new musician-friendly standards including:

  • Quantitative decibel limits for amplified sound, giving venues a clear, objective standard against which to measure and manage their operations
  • An adjustment to point of measurement for decimal levels, which will now be measured from the point of reception (where the noise is heard) instead of the property line of the sound source (music venue, festival site, etc.). 

Policy-makers heard from a wide range of groups, including venue owners, festival operators, artists, residents’ associations, businesses, public health authorities, and other interested stakeholders. The Toronto Music Advisory Council (TMAC) – of which Music Canada was a core member – also played an important role in the process, providing critical input and recommendations regarding the reform of various noise-related regulations. 

“These changes signal the City’s growing recognition of our businesses and organizations – who add significantly to the heart beat of Toronto,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the Canadian Live Music Association. “Live music venues and events are significant economic and cultural assets. They animate neighbourhoods, enhance benefit to local businesses, create jobs and attract tourists. We expect the new noise bylaw to be clearer in terms of interpretation and application.”

These bylaw amendments were first approved by City Council in April, but the policy changes came into effect on October 1. To learn more about the City of Toronto’s new Noise Bylaw, visit https://www.toronto.ca/city-government/public-notices-bylaws/bylaw-enforcement/noise/.

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The JUNO Awards returning to Toronto in 2021 for its 50th Anniversary

The The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS) has announced that the 2021 JUNO Awards will be held in Toronto. This commemorates the 50th anniversary of the event, and will take place on March 28th at the Scotiabank Arena.

It has been a decade since Toronto last hosted the JUNOS – which first began in 1970, and was held at the historic venue St. Lawrence Hall. The award ceremony continued to take place in the city for another exciting 20 years, and will now return to Toronto for its golden anniversary in 2021. During this time, the JUNOS hit the road, with each host city seeing an average of over $10 million in economic impact.

“50 years ago Walt Grealis and Stan Klees created the JUNO Awards right here in Toronto and it’s an honour to bring Canada’s biggest night in music back home to where it all started,” said Allan Reid, President & CEO of CARAS / The JUNO Awards and MusiCounts, in a release. “This country continues to produce some of the most vibrant artists in the world and we invite you to join us in what will be the greatest national celebration of Canadian music ever.

The return of the JUNOS is supported by the Province of Ontario and the City of Toronto. Both the Ontario Minister of Tourism, Culture Lisa MacLeod and Toronto Mayor John Tory released statements highlighting the city’s excitement over this announcement. In a video posted on his Twitter account, Mayor Tory added how Toronto’s music industry “has thrived as we foster a succesful environment for new and emerging artists, many of whom I hope to see at the JUNOS in a few short years.” 

JUNO Week 2021 will kick off on March 22 with the finale event, The JUNO Awards Broadcast, streaming on CBC Music from the Scotiabank Arena. The 2020 JUNOS are also just around the corner, airing live from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on Sunday, March 15, 2020.

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IFPI releases ‘Music Listening 2019’ report, providing a comprehensive look at rising music engagement in Canada and around the globe

Today, IFPI, the organization representing recorded music worldwide, released Music Listening 2019, a comprehensive overview of music consumption trends from around the world. The report examines the ways in which music consumers aged 16 – 64 engage with recorded music across 21 countries. 

The report illustrates the growth of music listening around the world. Globally, music listening is up, with respondents typically spending 18 hours per week listening to music, up from 17.8 hours in 2018. This equates to approximately 2.6 hours per day, the equivalent of listening to 52 three-minute songs per day. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

This global surge in music listening is driven by fans’ love of music – more than 54% of respondents say they “love” or are “fanatical” about music. Canadians are among the world leaders in terms of passion for music – 59% of Canadians say they are music lovers or music fanatics, which is above the global average and the fourth-highest in the world. 

“This year’s report tells an exciting story of how fans are increasingly engaging with music,” said Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI. “At a time when multiple forms of media vie for fans’ attention, they are not only choosing to spend more of their time listening to – and engaging with – music but they are doing so in increasingly diverse ways.” 

The report presents a profile of music lovers, who listen to more music per week, and to listen on a greater variety of services and platforms. 

Consumers’ embrace of music streaming services is growing across all demographics, with the highest rate of growth for the use of streaming services coming from the 35 – 64 age group. 54% of that demographic reported using a music streaming service in the past month, an increase of 8% from 2018. 

Overall, 89% of respondents listen to music using an on-demand streaming service. The biggest reasons consumers enjoy these services include access to large catalogues of music, and the convenience of listening. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

The report also shows that copyright infringement remains a threat to the music ecosystem. 27% of respondents used copyright infringement as a way to listen to or obtain music in the past month. The most prevalent form of music piracy is illegal stream ripping services, which were used to access music by 23% of respondents. 

“The report also highlights that the availability of music through unlicensed methods, or copyright infringement, remains a real threat to the music ecosystem,” continued Moore. “Practices such as stream ripping are still prevalent and return nothing to those who create and invest in music. We continue to coordinate world-wide action to address this.”

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The report also illustrates the scale of music listening via video services. Globally, 47% of on-demand streaming consumption is via video streaming, ahead of paid audio streaming (37%) and free audio streaming (15%). 77% of respondents said they used YouTube for music in the past month. 

This trend is concerning, as user-upload services like YouTube pay significantly lower royalty rates compared with other music streaming services.  This has a significant impact on artists’ and other rights holders’ incomes: plays on Spotify or Apple Music put dramatically more money in their pockets than the same number of plays on YouTube. The average annual revenue to rights holders per user is estimated by IFPI at under US$1 on YouTube, while on Spotify the comparative figure is US$20. 

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The biggest cause of this discrepancy in royalty rates are provisions in Canada’s Copyright Act known as “safe harbours” that ad-supported user-upload services like YouTube claim as shelter from liability of responsibility for illegal activity. As examined in our recent report, Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, the prevalence of services such as YouTube depresses not only consumer demand for paid subscription services (that better compensate artists and other rights holders by orders of magnitude) but also royalties paid by those services. These effects are the result of substitution possibilities, such as when a service like YouTube, which profits enormously through the subsidy enabled by overly broad safe harbours, provides a free alternative to paid services.

This is why Music Canada supports the recommendations of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s ground-breaking Shifting Paradigms report, which recommends to the government a series of actions that would help artists and the creative industries. The report tackles numerous weaknesses in Canada’s Copyright Act, identifying elements which have failed to keep pace with technology and the digital marketplace for music. Among its key recommendations which will bolster a functioning marketplace for creative works, the report recommends addressing Canada’s broad safe harbour laws, eliminating or narrowing exemptions from the Act that prevent creators from being fairly compensated, combating modern forms of piracy (like stream ripping) and strengthening the enforcement of Canada’s copyright laws.

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Haviah Mighty wins 2019 Polaris Music Prize

Community Development Program participants applaud her performance and album

On September 16, Haviah Mighty won the 2019 Polaris Music Prize for her album, 13th Floor. The Prize recognizes the best Canadian album of the year based on artistic merit without regard to genre, sales history or label affiliation, as determined by the Polaris Grand Jury. 

“For me the 13th Floor is something that we remove from our reality because it is something that we don’t understand and therefore we dismiss it,” said Mighty in a Polaris release. “This is very parallel to so many of the experiences that I speak on, on this album. I’m in a room with so many different people from so many different walks of life who have acknowledged that this is something they feel is important. These people don’t necessarily share the narratives that I do or the walks of life that I have, and yet, here we are, finally on what I believe is the 13th Floor. This is the moment of resurgence where the dismissal that has existed is now being removed, and the discussion is being had. I’m so grateful that the people around me push me to be brave enough to speak my truth and to have it be acknowledged in this way.”

The Prize was awarded at the Polaris Prize Gala, held at the historic Carlu in Toronto, which featured performances by nine of the 10 Polaris Short List nominees. The Gala featured performances by Marie Davidson, Elisapie, FET.NAT, Dominique Fils-Aimé, Les Louanges, Haviah Mighty, PUP, Shad and Snotty Nose Rez Kids. Short-lister Jessie Reyez was also in attendance. 

Among the audience attendees were 40 engaged music creators, entrepreneurs and change makers, who took part in the Polaris Community Development Program (CDP), presented by Music Canada. Launched in 2018, the program partners with Canadian not-for-profit music organizations each year to improve equity and representation in the Canadian music industry to support and develop the music community. 

Participating organizations in the 2019 Community Development Program included: 

POLARIS MUSIC PRIZE GALA 2019
Carlu, Toronto. September 16, 2019
Photo by Dustin Rabin

  • Honey Jam
  • The Indigenous Music Alliance
  • The Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance
  • Lula World
  • Manifesto
  • Native Women in the Arts
  • The Remix Project
  • SoundCheck Youth
  • U for Change
  • Urban Arts

Two of the participating organizations had alumni represented on the Polaris Prize Short List.

Jessie Reyez joined The Remix Project program in 2014, and was a graduate of Round 11.0 of the program. 

“I always feel honoured every time I talk about the Remix Project because it’s done so much for me,” said Reyez in 2018, shortly after being nominated for four JUNO Awards. “The program and that formula works — if you go in there and you do what you’re supposed to do and you don’t waste the opportunity.”

Haviah Mighty participated in the Honey Jam showcase in 2011, 2012, and 2015. 

“For those who think they can wing a performance, I learned from Elaine that there is so much more that goes into being a strong performer,” said Mighty in a recent Toronto Star article. “(Professional musicians) understand exactly what they want to look like onstage. Nothing is a whim. My live performance is what garnered the interest of my team, my booking agent, my management.”

Prior to the Gala, participants took part in a brief information session, creating an opportunity for participants to connect with Music Canada and Polaris staff, media, and other community members in a welcoming environment. 

A selection of social media reaction from participants is included below:

Honoured to be included with all of the Polaris Community Partners including Lula World, The Remix Project, SoundCheck…

Posted by Honey Jam Canada on Wednesday, September 18, 2019

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2jl0h4heYC/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2he9vNnG0h/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2hTo1HHxZ2/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

 

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