Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

Join Mailing List

Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

 Music Canada

News Release (127)

view

Public Research Findings: Canadians understand the cultural and economic impacts of the pandemic on live music – and its need for continued support

February 8, 2021, Toronto: Music Canada has partnered with Abacus Data to check back in with Canadians on their understanding of COVID-19’s ongoing impact on Canada’s live music sector — and the effects that venue closures have on those working in the music sector and its lasting impact on communities, arts and culture. The public opinion research also explored how Canadians feel about venue closures and their views on the need for continued support for those working in the sector. The findings show that Canadians are concerned that without additional support, more live music spaces will be lost before the music community can recover, resulting in a longer threat to the industry and a negative impact on Canadian culture.

“This latest research confirms that Canadians view live music venues, like festivals, concert halls and pubs, as economic and cultural lifelines within their communities,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Canadians also understand that the pandemic will have severe impacts on the long-term viability of the live music sector which affects Canadian culture in the long run.”

“The research also confirmed what we have long believed to be true: music lovers can’t wait to get back to seeing live shows, once it’s safe to do so. But Canadians also believe that artists, live music venues, crews and others working in the industry will require continued support long after other sectors of the economy can reopen. Notably, most Canadians will be “disappointed” if more venues go out of business.”

According to the report, one in five Canadians has a favourite live music venue in their community where they attend events, and half believe it is likely the venue will close due to impacts of the pandemic. Canadians believe that further live music venue closures will mean thousands of jobs lost, fewer musicians and music will be created, and new and upcoming musicians will be lost without the opportunity of playing in live music venues. These impacts are felt across Canada, and even more strongly in Quebec.

“This research substantiates everything we’ve been hearing – Canadians are deeply saddened by the loss of live music venues,” said Erin Benjamin, President & CEO of the Canadian Live Music Association. “Venues are closing their doors in increasing numbers, for circumstances beyond their control and people are recognizing the extent of the loss, and what that loss means – economically, culturally, and socially. Direct financial support today from governments is urgently needed; it can keep more venues alive, helping us to preserve as much of our vital cultural infrastructure as possible until the industry can fully recover.”

“As an artist, it is devastating to see the severe and long-term impact the pandemic is having on the music community, after nearly a year of living with restrictions due to COVID-19,” said Miranda Mulholland, artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “Artists, and emerging artists especially, depend on live performances to develop their craft, generate a following, and gain income. The opportunity to do that, at every milestone in your career, is only possible with multiple venues from the smallest locations to the larger stages and concert halls.”

In a separate report expected to be released in the coming weeks, Music Canada is checking back in with Canadian artists and creators for a renewed perspective on how their profession has evolved at this stage of the pandemic. Data for these two studies will continue to be shared with government and industry partners in 2021. The findings are helping to shape Music Canada’s advocacy message, and give decision makers a complete and up-to-date picture of the recovery phase in the music industry. 

The Canadian Live Music Association (CLMA), the people behind live music in Canada are also working to bring awareness to the damage COVID-19 shutdowns have caused Canada’s live music industry and will make further information available here.

For more information on earlier study findings please visit Music Canada’s website here

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-government-support-music-canada/.

-30-

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

Music Canada Launches New Artist Focused Survey

January 11, 2021, Toronto: Music Canada has partnered with Abacus Data to get a renewed understanding of how artists’ perspectives continue to be impacted, ten months into the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey will hear directly from artists on the financial implications they are experiencing, how the pandemic is impacting their ability to create music, and how they are building or evolving skill sets to help them get by.

Canadian artists are encouraged to add their voice by completing the survey linked at https://musiccanada.com/artist-survey-2021. The survey is available in English and French.

“Artists are often the most vulnerable in the music ecosystem. Projects like this help Music Canada explain to governments how the pandemic has affected us both financially and creatively,” said Eon Sinclair of Bedouin Soundclash.

In a separate survey, Music Canada is also asking Canadians about how their relationship with music continues to evolve. 

Data from these two studies will continue to shape Music Canada’s advocacy with government and industry partners in 2021. The results will help give decision makers a complete and up-to-date picture of the recovery phase in the music industry. This research will be made available publicly as soon as possible.

“As we quickly approach a year of restrictions preventing the normal activities of artists, it is important for Music Canada to check in with artists again,” said Patrick Rogers, CEO of Music Canada. “Their voices and experiences shape our message to government and industry partners, as we find ways to help support the music community’s recovery.”

“As an artist, I know the pandemic is causing serious and very likely irreparable harm to artists in Canada,” said Miranda Mulholland, Artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “Long after other elements of the economy have reopened, artists, venues and support staff will require additional support for us to be able to return when the general public is also ready to do so. Government and public support will be necessary for this return.” 

For more information on earlier study findings please visit Music Canada’s website here.

-30-

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

Announcement of New Leadership at Music Canada and CONNECT

TORONTO, January 7, 2021: The Board Chair of Music Canada, Jennifer Sloan, today announced Patrick Rogers has been named Chief Executive Officer of Music Canada. Rogers had previously been the Vice President, Corporate Affairs and served as interim co-CEO since June.

Additionally, Jackie Dean has been appointed President of CONNECT Music Licensing by the shareholders and will remain Chief Operating Officer of Music Canada after also serving as interim co-CEO since June.

“After a competitive search process with a wide variety of talented and interested candidates, the Board is confident Patrick’s vision for Music Canada builds on the organization’s record of success with an eye to the opportunities of the future,” said Sloan. “His leadership style, coupled with his unique experience, make him the right person to represent Canada’s major record companies as CEO of Music Canada.”

“I am excited for the opportunity and thank the Board for entrusting me to lead this talented team. I look forward to continuing Music Canada’s passionate advocacy for Canada’s creators and working with others in the cultural industries to accomplish our shared objectives,” said Rogers.

“Jackie’s appointment at CONNECT Music Licensing will strengthen the leadership structure of this important organization, allowing it to provide the greatest value to its members,” continued Sloan.

“The opportunity to lead CONNECT Music Licensing means having a hands-on role in making sure that CONNECT’s members are compensated when their music is played,” said Dean. “I look forward to utilizing my leadership, industry and financial experience to fulfill the mandate of the organization.”

Both appointments are effective Monday, January 11th.

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

About CONNECT Music Licensing
CONNECT Music Licensing administers licences in Canada for the reproduction of sound recordings, and the reproduction and broadcast of music videos, on behalf of the copyright owners. CONNECT’s members, which include all of the major record labels, many independent labels, and thousands of independent artists and producers, own or control the copyright in the vast majority of all the sound recordings and music videos produced or distributed in Canada.
CONNECT Music Licensing represents its members at Re:Sound for the communication, public performance and private copying of their eligible sound recordings.

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

Comments
view

Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing release new research report, Supporting Artist Entrepreneurs in the Evolving Music Economy

To help enable sustainable careers for artist entrepreneurs, Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing have released a new research report, titled Supporting Artist Entrepreneurs in the Evolving Music Economy.

The report summarizes the findings of a national research study of more than 300 artist entrepreneurs, conducted by Music Canada and CONNECT. The study shows that a lack of business and entrepreneurial training, as well as gaps in understanding of music sector structures, are key barriers to success for artists. 

“Too often overlooked in economic development conversations, artists are a remarkable segment of Canadian entrepreneurs who contribute to both the economic and cultural fabric of our society, and help create jobs for themselves and others in the Canadian music economy,” says Sarah Hashem, Music Canada’s Vice President, Strategic Initiatives. “According to the COVID-19 Artist Impact Survey we conducted with CONNECT earlier this year, each artist creates an average of 3.7 jobs. However, a gap exists in entrepreneurial support and training available to artists.”

The report identifies artists’ key business needs within an evolving music economy, outlines industry-wide strategies to promote artists’ business success, and makes recommendations that can be applied by government and artist-serving organizations to better support artists in sustaining their livelihoods through music. 

“Artist entrepreneurs represent more than 90% of CONNECT’s members, and the great majority of the creative middle class,” says Catherine Jones, Executive Director of CONNECT Music Licensing. “Like entrepreneurs in other fields, artists are creative, they are risk-takers, and they are job-creators. By supporting them with training and resources, we can help empower more artists to achieve their goals and earn a sustainable career.”

Music Canada and CONNECT have begun addressing some of the gaps with initiatives such as the Industry Insider Video Series. We hope the report can inspire artists serving organizations and government agencies to incorporate entrepreneurship and business  resources in their artist support offerings.

Download Report

Comments
view

ADVANCE and Music Canada Announce 3 Year Partnership

September 16, 2020, Toronto: ADVANCE, Canada’s Black Music Business Collective, and Music Canada and its members, Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada, are honoured to announce a new three year partnership. Black artists and music industry professionals are a driving force in the success of the music sector, and our organizations will work together to advance the shared values of the promotion, elevation and retention of Black people working in the Canadian music business.

ADVANCE is thrilled to work alongside Music Canada to create initiatives and pathways for change for Black music professionals. The partnership includes direct financial support as well as a commitment from Music Canada to contribute professional services to help achieve tangible reform in the music business landscape, particularly in the corporate, private, and government sectors. Initiatives will focus on creating, changing and sustaining the infrastructure needed to advance and amplify Black voices in the music industry. This commitment will support actions that align with ADVANCE’s four pillars: research, advocacy and government partnerships; mentorship and education; community outreach; and business development and entrepreneurship.

“ADVANCE looks forward to our partnership with Music Canada and its members. This partnership will facilitate direct lines of communication with the leaders in the industry and therefore is an integral step in not only identifying structural barriers for entry and employee/artist advancement, but most importantly, working to implement change that results in increased employment and development opportunities for Black music professionals in Canada,” said ADVANCE.

“Music Canada acknowledges the need to support this movement, and we are honoured to partner with ADVANCE,” said Jackie Dean, Interim Co-CEO of Music Canada. “We remain committed to sustained action that supports the values of equity, diversity and inclusion at every level of the music industry.”

Music Canada thanks our members for their support to build, with greater urgency, real and  meaningful change for the Black community. With the leadership and vision of our Advisory Council, Music Canada will also continue to promote initiatives that help shape a fairer future through education and accountability. 

-30-


About ADVANCE
Serving as a unified front for Black people working within the business sectors of the Canadian music industry, ADVANCE creates conditions for long-term success by addressing racial equality and inclusivity through four areas: Advocacy, Mentorship, Community Outreach and Business Development and Entrepreneurship. By holding the corporate, private and government sectors accountable, ADVANCE is committed to building a more equitable Canadian music industry that grants Canada’s Black music communities a fair and valued voice in a consistently growing music nation. 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

 

Jamelia Campbell
ADVANCE
jamelia@advancemusic.org

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

Comments
view

Public Research Findings: Threat to live music extended as more Canadians to avoid public events for longer

August 10, 2020, Toronto: Music Canada commissioned Abacus Data to conduct public opinion research to determine how the music industry is being impacted by Canadians’ changing feelings around music, during the pandemic. The second round of the national public opinion survey found that an increasing number of Canadians are concerned about COVID-19, and a growing number of them plan to avoid public events even after restrictions are lifted, resulting in a longer threat to live music.

“The ongoing triple threat facing the live music industry, and all mass gathering industries, requires government action,” said Patrick Rogers, Interim co-Chief Executive Officer. “This threat includes the medical concerns that Canadians have about the virus, that government restrictions on large gatherings will remain well into recovery, and that even after government restrictions are lifted, confidence in returning to live events will continue to be low.”

“Live music was one of the first sectors impacted by the pandemic, and it will continue to feel the impacts long after restrictions are lifted,” continued Rogers. “Artists, venues and support staff will require further support long after other elements of the economy have reopened.”

Concern among Canadians about the pandemic remains elevated, with more believing that “the worst is yet to come” than did in April. The research shows that even as economies begin to slowly re-open, more Canadians expect to stay away from live music events long after physical distancing restrictions are lifted. Even those who regularly attended live music events before the pandemic, 55% said that they will wait at least 6 months or longer to attend a music festival after physical restrictions end – and for large concert venues, it was 60%. Perceptions of risk for attending these types of events are rising over time – instead of declining. The findings ultimately point to the prolonged threat faced by the live music industry.

“This research confirms that Canadians continue to worry about the health impacts of COVID-19. While both artists and fans dearly miss the live music experience, it is clear that ongoing concerns about the virus will continue to significantly impact live events well into 2021,” said Jackie Dean, Music Canada’s Interim co-Chief Executive Officer. “The results show that certain safety measures will help attract some live music lovers back to live events – but many will remain hesitant.” 

Many Canadians want to get back to enjoying live music when it’s safe to do so. As the pandemic continues, the research found that self-identified “live music lovers” now miss live music even more than they did in April. 90% of respondents in this group now say “I really miss going to concerts” – and 89% of this group agree that digital content will never replace the feeling of seeing live music (an increase of 5% from polling conducted at the end of April). 

This research builds upon Abacus Data’s findings from earlier in the pandemic. In May, Abacus’ national public opinion survey identified the triple threat the music industry faces in its recovery from the impacts of COVID-19. 

Music Canada also commissioned Abacus Data to conduct national research that explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through the experience of Canada’s artists. That research found that professional musicians are feeling increasing pressure as a result of the pandemic, due to a reduction in income and their ability to produce music that threatens their ability to survive.

“The pandemic has had a devastating impact on artists’ ability to perform, to create, and to earn a living from their music,” said Miranda Mulholland, artist and Chair of the Music Canada Advisory Council. “While the findings are bleak, this series of research is providing valuable insights for artists, industry, and government as we look for safe ways to return to work. It is clear that artists and those who work closely with them in the live performance space will need further support as the economy begins to reopen.”

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-threat-pandemic-music-canada/.

-30-

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

National Research: Musicians Feeling the Pressure to Perform in a Continuing Pandemic

July 16, 2020, Toronto –  Music Canada has commissioned Abacus Data to conduct national research that explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through the experience of Canada’s artists. Professional musicians are feeling increasing pressure as a result of the pandemic, due to a reduction in income and their ability to produce music that threatens their ability to survive.

“Musicians are experiencing severe, short-term impacts due to the restrictions on live, in-person events that many of us rely on as a main source of income,” said Miranda Mulholland, Artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “While live music is crucial to Canada’s professional musicians, both financially and as an outlet for their creativity, artists have strong concerns about the health risk of the virus and its impact on their ability to perform. And over the longer-term, the pandemic has fundamentally changed the way artists earn a living and create music.”

The report found that professional musicians perform, on average, 96 times a year, typically traveling across Canada and the world. Revenue generated from live performances in turn helps support an average of 11.5 other people, such as band members, technicians, and other industry jobs. A staggering 85% have agreed that without live performances, they will have difficulty earning enough to pay their bills. To further highlight the full impact of the pandemic, for the remainder of 2020, the average number of bookings is eight, down from last year’s average of 87. More than half of musicians surveyed have zero performances booked for the remainder of the year. 

Music Canada thanks all participants who shared their experiences with Abacus Data. On behalf of Music Canada, Abacus Data conducted an online focus group to help guide the construction of the survey in order to accurately capture the impact the COVID-19 pandemic was having on the careers, emotional and financial well-being of professional musicians in Canada.

Many professional musicians have been able to take advantage of government emergency aid to pay for everyday expenses. As these programs come to a close, the outlook for 2021 is immensely uncertain. Many live events have been cancelled or postponed for the remainder of 2020, and well into 2021. Musicians are not expecting a quick return to the stage because of continuing government restrictions, and for many- their own concerns of performing while the health risk of the virus remains.

“As reopening begins and many focus on the impacts on businesses and the consumer experience, we asked artists’ how the pandemic is impacting them, and how they feel about performing again, after restrictions are lifted,” said Jackie Dean, Interim co-Chief Executive Officer & Chief Operating Officer. “What we hear is that for many, the pandemic feels like a choice that no one should have to make, a choice between earning a living or keeping family and loved ones safe. As governments move forward with plans to reopen the spaces artists work and perform, the concerns of artists must be included in the process.”

“Not only are musicians anxious about the financial implications resulting from cancelled concerts and impossible profit margins due to social distancing restrictions, they are also worried about the health risks associated with the pandemic,” continued Mulholland. “They are concerned about their families, their fans, audiences, and themselves. Even when safety precautions are being taken, the risk of COVID-19 is still too great for many musicians to consider touring for the foreseeable future.”

These findings reflect the feelings of musicians in the industry, and are significant for the prospects of the industry as a whole. As governments continue to implement physical distancing requirements, and live performances remain limited, many professional musicians in Canada will struggle to get by. This is having a long-term impact on their creativity, and ability to create new music.

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/crowded-out-musicians-live-performances-covid19-pandemic/.

Initial Public Research Findings from Music Canada and Abacus Data on the pandemic, and the effect it is having on live music are available here.

-30-

 

Erica Meekes
Director of Public Relations and Events
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

 


About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

Music Canada Statement on The Next Steps for the Canadian Music Industry

Music Canada and its members, Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada, have heard the calls for change within the music industry. We recognize that there is a need for improvement and are committed to sustained action in support of the values of equity, diversity and inclusion.  With the support of our members, Music Canada will build upon efforts with greater urgency to create meaningful change for the Black community.  To do so, Music Canada will continue to invest in and empower our Advisory Council to help shape a fairer future through education and accountability. 

-30-

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

Music Canada Announces Departure of Chief Executive Officer

May 28, 2020, Toronto: The Music Canada Board of Directors and Graham Henderson, President and Chief Executive Officer, announced this afternoon Graham will be stepping down after serving more than 15 years. 

“I have been given the great honour and privilege of serving the members of Music Canada and the wider music community for 15 thrilling and rewarding years. And throughout this entire time I have had the unalloyed joy of working with the most incredibly dedicated, effective team of music lovers in the world: my staff!” Mr. Henderson said. “I have absolutely every confidence that the staff, the Board and everyone at Sony, Universal and Warner will go forward from strength to strength. I hope that my experience and insight may be of some value down the road.”  

On behalf of the Board, Chairperson Jennifer M. Sloan said, “We thank Graham for guiding Music Canada through a period of phenomenal growth and transition, including his dogged domestic and international championing of copyright reform and protection. Graham has led Music Canada’s transformation, strengthening our executive team and developing a clear strategic path forward as the trusted voice of the music industry in Canada and a recognized global partner.”

Graham added, “As for me? Well, my passion for the cause will never abate. In the meantime, I have one of the best darn poetry websites in the world and you are all welcome to join me as I explore the life and times of the revolutionary writer, Percy Bysshe Shelley! He reflects my mood best in these lines: “The world’s great age begins anew, The golden years return, The earth doth like a snake renew…A brighter Hellas rears its mountains…Another Athens shall arise.”

Graham will continue to serve as CEO until June 17, 2020. The Board wishes to thank Graham for all his years of dedicated service to the organization and to the advocacy work it does. 

The Board will initiate a search to identify a new CEO and has appointed Jackie Dean, Chief Operating Officer, and Patrick Rogers, Vice President Corporate Affairs, to serve as interim co-Chief Executive Officers, effective June 18, 2020.

 

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

Public Research Findings: Live Music Industry Faces Triple Threat During Recovery

May 14, 2020, Toronto: Music Canada commissioned Abacus Data to conduct public opinion research to determine how Canadians’ feelings around music have changed during the pandemic. The national public opinion survey gauged the comfort Canadians have for returning to live music as restrictions lift, and the results are startling. 

“As governments across Canada and the world increasingly shift their focus to recovery, this data from Abacus underscores the precarious position of the live music ecosystem – an ecosystem upon which artists rely for a significant, and in some cases predominant, portion of their livelihood,” said Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “The music industry faces a triple threat. First – the very real medical concerns of Canadians about the virus. Second – that government restrictions will remain on large gatherings well into recovery. And third – that even after government restrictions have lifted and economies begin to reopen – Canadian confidence in returning to these live events will continue to be low.”

The findings show that even of the self identified “live music lovers” – for many, it will be at least 6 months after government restrictions are lifted, before they feel comfortable going to: bars / pubs (28%); small venue concerts (35%); large venue concerts (42%); festivals (41%); community event with live music (31%). 

The research also demonstrated how important music is in helping Canadians to get through the pandemic. Nearly two thirds  (58%) of respondents reported feeling worse about the pandemic because of the cancellation of live music events. Half of those identified as “live music lovers” also reported listening to more music during the pandemic, and that for the vast majority (86%), listening to music is a way to relieve stress. 

“As an artist, what I’m finding I miss the most is the collaboration and connection I have onstage with my fellow musicians and that powerful, ephemeral experience that is created between artists and a live audience,” said Miranda Mulholland, Artist and Chair of Music Canada’s Advisory Council. “What I find most heartening is that 84% of Music Lovers state that digital will never replace the live experience. Also, more than a third of respondents increased their music listening during this pandemic. These stats show that people clearly recognize the value and importance of music in their lives, perhaps more than they ever have.”

“Unfortunately, it’s clear that the pandemic will cause serious and possibly irreparable harm to Canada’s artists, the majority of whom were already living in a precarious state. We must continue to think about how we can help them through this as they’ve been here for all of us in this crisis,” said Mulholland.

Not only are these findings significant for the music industry, but they are important for the travel and tourism industries as well. As the government and music industry develops plans for recovery, they must understand that those whose businesses depend on large gatherings will continue to be affected by this pandemic for a much longer time. To that end, Music Canada will continue to assess Canadian’s changing perspectives on their comfort for returning to live music so that we can deliver this important and timely information to our partners.

For more information on the findings released from Abacus Data, please visit: https://abacusdata.ca/live-music-after-pandemic/.

-30-

Erica Meekes
Music Canada
emeekes@musiccanada.com
(416) 462-1485

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments

This website made possible with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.