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Music Canada applauds Ministers Bains and Joly for initiating the statutory review of Copyright Act

Toronto, Dec 13, 2017: Music Canada applauds today’s announcement by The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, in conjunction with The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, regarding the review of the Copyright Act, to be conducted by the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology.

“I applaud Minister Bains and Minister Joly for initiating this review of the Copyright Act,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “Music creators, and all creators who depend on copyright, deserve a Copyright Act that protects their rights when their works are commercialized by others. This is our chance to address the Value Gap threatening the livelihood of Canadian creators and the future of Canadian culture.”

Music Canada recently examined the significant changes in business models that are impacting the value chains for copyrighted content in our report, The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach.

“A modern copyright framework containing strong IP and copyright provisions is essential for an effective marketplace for music creators,” says Artist Advocate Miranda Mulholland. “This Copyright Act review is an important first step in ensuring artists and labels are able to earn a fair market value for their work. Canadian creators have been eagerly awaiting this review.”

Music Canada looks forward to participating in the process to ensure that creators are fairly compensated for the use of their works under the revised Act.

Adds Henderson, “We must ensure this review yields meaningful results.”

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For more information:
Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster. For more on Music Canada, please visit www.musiccanada.com

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Breakthrough collaboration between Bell Media, Music Canada and Re:Sound creates international gold standard with music creators at its heart

 

Toronto, Dec 6, 2017: Advancements in cross-platform reporting have ushered in a new era of cooperation between Canada’s music and media industries. Developed by Bell Media, Music Canada and Re:Sound, the new process aligns terrestrial broadcast data with digital, ensuring all music industry stakeholders are served with efficiency, transparency, and accountability, while setting a new industry standard for data reporting. With this game-changing initiative by Bell Media, the automation of the existing music content distribution tool allows the industry to streamline sound recording data within the Canadian music ecosystem.

The new system is part of an ongoing project to develop administrative efficiencies by Music Canada and Re:Sound. Through consolidating multiple data sets, maximizing the use of ISRC (International Standard Recording Codes), and other improvements, the project has so far resulted in faster payouts and 28% more revenue for major labels and members of CIMA (the Canadian Independent Music Association).

Beginning with a successful pilot program of the new system by Toronto’s 104.5 CHUM FM in early 2017, Bell Media radio stations are now tracking complete sound recording data including ISRC automatically on new tracks from major record labels and independent label partners. With the elimination of manual processes, the new reporting system has resulted in cleaner data, which significantly benefits all rights holders in the Canadian music industry including artists, background musicians, songwriters, and music publishers, through organizations (SOCAN, CMRRA, SODRAC, etc.) relying on broadcast data to get royalties to rights holders.

“I commend Bell Media, and specifically Randy Lennox, for showing remarkable leadership on this project,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “Thanks to this collaboration, achievements in data efficiency from projects completed by the major record companies and Re:Sound will now yield even greater results, generating savings throughout the royalty chain, while resulting in more dollars in the pockets of creators.”

“As someone with love for Canada’s music industry, I am thrilled by the results of this project,” said Randy Lennox, President, Bell Media. “When Music Canada’s Graham Henderson approached us to help resolve what has been a longstanding issue within Canada’s music industry, it was an easy decision to lend Bell Media’s resources and expertise. The automation of the tracking process establishes international best practices that benefit creators while making the entire system considerably more efficient.”

“At Re:Sound, we only exist for the artists and sound recording owners we represent,” says Ian MacKay, President of Re:Sound. “Ensuring that the absolute best quality data flows through the entire music ecosystem is a huge step forward for rights holders, and will help us (and other organizations) to ensure that we pay the right people as quickly and efficiently as possible. We couldn’t have done this without the strong leadership of Bell Media and Music Canada.”

 

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For more information:

Siobhan Özege, Re:Sound
sozege@resound.ca
+1 (416) 968-8870 ext 369

Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Renee Dupuis-Macht, Bell Media
Renee.dupuismacht@bellmedia.ca
+1 (416) 384-3154

 

About Re:Sound
Re:Sound is the Canadian not-for-profit music licensing company dedicated to obtaining fair compensation for artists and record companies for their performance rights.  Re:Sound advocates for music creators, educates music users, licenses businesses and distributes public performance and broadcast royalties to creators – all to help build a thriving and sustainable music industry in Canada. For more on Re:Sound Music Licensing, please visit www.resound.ca

 

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada: Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster. For more on Music Canada, please visit www.musiccanada.com

 

About Bell Media
Bell Media is Canada’s leading content creation company with premier assets in television, radio, out-of-home advertising, and digital media. Bell Media owns 30 local television stations led by CTV, Canada’s highest-rated television network; 30 specialty channels, including TSN and RDS, and four pay TV services, including The Movie Network and Super Écran. Bell Media is also Canada’s largest radio broadcaster, with 215 music channels including 105 licensed radio stations in 54 markets across the country, all part of the iHeartRadio brand and streaming service. Bell Media owns Astral Out of Home with a network of more than 30,000 advertising faces in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Québec, and Nova Scotia. Bell Media also operates more than 200 websites; delivers TV Everywhere with its CraveTV and GO video streaming services; operates multi-channel network Much Digital Studios; produces live theatrical shows via its partnership with Iconic Entertainment Studios; and owns Dome Productions Inc., a multi-platform production company. Bell Media is part of BCE Inc. (TSX, NYSE: BCE), Canada’s largest communications company. For more on Bell Media, please visit www.bellmedia.ca.

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Media Advisory: Where would Google be without creators and the distortion of copyright protections?

Toronto, Nov. 2, 2017: In a ground-breaking report, Music Canada, a national trade organization, documents the scale of harm being caused by the Value Gap – defined as the significant disparity between the value of creative content that is accessed, particularly through user upload content services like YouTube, and the revenues returned to the people and businesses who create it.

“This is the story you will not hear from Google,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada.  “YouTube would never have emerged as the largest music service without distorting the use of safe harbour protections in copyright law that were created to protect ‘mere conduits’ or ‘dumb pipes.’  We now know that today’s digital platforms are the smartest pipes that have ever been imagined.”

Creators and governments around the world are taking notice, and taking action. In Canada, thousands of musicians, authors, poets, visual artists, playwrights and other members of the creative class, have urged the Canadian government to address the Value Gap in a campaign called Focus On Creators.

The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach is available for download at https://musiccanada.com/resources/research/the-value-gap-report/.

Interviews are available at request.

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For more information please contact:

Corey Poole
Communications Coordinator
Music Canada
647-808-7359

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Music Canada calls on the Government of Canada to take steps to address the Value Gap in new, first-of-its-kind report

At its annual general meeting, Playback 2017, Music Canada today released The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach, the first comprehensive collection of information about the Value Gap, and the solutions available to Canadian policy makers.

The Value Gap is defined as the significant disparity between the value of creative content that is accessed and enjoyed by consumers, and the revenues that are returned to the people and businesses who create it.

“The Value Gap challenges the livelihood and sustainability of an entire global social class, and threatens the future of Canadian culture,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “Our creative industries and the Government of Canada need to come together to acknowledge that the problem facing our creators is real, that the landscape has dramatically changed, and that we need to adapt our rules and regulations before full-time creativity becomes a thing of the past.”

At the heart of the Value Gap for music is misapplied and outdated “safe harbour” provisions in copyright law, which result in creators having to forego copyright royalty payments to which they should be entitled, and amount to a system of subsidies to other industries.

Creators and governments around the world are taking notice, and taking action. The European Commission has pinpointed the Value Gap as the cause of a marketplace that isn’t functioning properly, and acknowledged that a legislative fix is needed. Hundreds of thousands of U.S. music creators have agreed that the safe harbour provisions in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act need to be changed.

In Canada, thousands of musicians, authors, poets, visual artists, playwrights and other members of the creative class, have urged The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, to put creators at the heart of future policy in a campaign called Focus On Creators.

The Value Gap: Its Origins, Impacts and a Made-in-Canada Approach provides important insights into how policy makers can reverse the Value Gap. For instance, the Canadian Copyright Act contains provisions that allow and, in some cases, even encourage the commercialization of creators’ work without the need for proper remuneration, undercutting one of its overarching principles: to ensure that creators receive a just reward for the use of their works.

To address these inequities, the federal government should take the following actions:

  1. Focus on the Effects of Safe Harbour Laws and Exceptions

The Canadian government should, like its international counterparts, review and address safe harbour laws and exceptions, and their subsequent misapplication by some technology companies, as well as the cross-subsidies that have been added to the Copyright Act.

  1. Canada’s Creative Industries are Asking for Meaningful Reforms

During the mandated five-year review of the Copyright Act slated to begin in late 2017, the government should review the Act for instances that allow others to commercialize creative works without properly remunerating artists, and end these cross-subsidies.

  1. Remove the $1.25 Million Radio Royalty Exemption

Since 1997, commercial radio stations have only been required to pay $100 in performance royalties on their first $1.25 million advertising revenue. This exemption should be eliminated. It amounts to a subsidy being paid by artists to large vertically-integrated media companies.

  1. Amend the Definition of Sound Recording

In the Copyright Act, recorded music is actually not considered a ‘sound recording’ (and thus not entitled to royalties) when it is included in a TV or film soundtrack. The definition should be changed to allow performers and creators of recorded music to collect royalties when music is part of a TV/film soundtrack.

The full report can be downloaded at this link.

 

 

Music Canada demande au gouvernement du Canada de prendre des mesures pour remédier à l’écart de valeur dans un nouveau rapport pas comme les autres

Dans le cadre de son assemblée générale annuelle intitulée Playback 2017, Music Canada a annoncé aujourd’hui le lancement de L’Écart de valeur : ses origines, ses impacts et une démarche faite au Canada, le premier recueil de renseignements exhaustifs sur l’écart de valeur et les solutions qui sont à la portée des décideurs politiques canadiens pour y remédier.

L’écart de valeur se définit comme l’importante disparité qui existe entre la valeur du contenu créatif que les consommateurs consultent et apprécient, et les revenus qui sont réacheminés vers les personnes et les entreprises qui l’ont créé.

« L’écart de valeur menace le gagne-pain et la durabilité de toute une classe sociale à travers le monde et met en péril l’avenir de la culture canadienne », soutient Graham Henderson, président et chef de la direction de Music Canada. « Nos industries créatives et le gouvernement du Canada doivent s’unir pour reconnaître que le problème auquel sont confrontés nos créateurs est bien réel, que le paysage a profondément évolué et que nous devons adapter nos règles et règlements avant que la créativité à temps plein ne devienne chose du passé. »

L’écart de valeur tient essentiellement à l’application erronée de dispositions dépassées de la législation sur le droit d’auteur en matière d’exemptions de responsabilité (les safe harbours de la loi américaine) qui forcent les créateurs à sacrifier des redevances auxquelles ils devraient avoir droit, ce qui revient à un système de subventions accordées à d’autres industries.

Les créateurs et les gouvernements du monde entier réagissent et passent à l’action. La Commission européenne a identifié l’écart de valeur comme étant la cause du dysfonctionnement du marché, et elle a reconnu qu’une correction législative s’impose. Des centaines de milliers de créateurs de musique américains s’entendent pour réclamer la modification des exemptions de responsabilité de la loi américaine sur le droit d’auteur, le Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Au Canada, des milliers de musiciens, auteurs, poètes, artistes visuels, dramaturges et autres membres de la classe créative ont instamment prié l’honorable Mélanie Joly, ministre du Patrimoine canadien, de mettre les créateurs au cœur de la future politique culturelle dans le cadre d’une campagne nommée Pleins feux sur les créateurs.

L’Écart de valeur : ses origines, ses impacts et une démarche faite au Canada apporte un éclairage important sur les mesures que les décideurs politiques peuvent  prendre pour inverser l’écart de valeur. La Loi sur le droit d’auteur du Canada, par exemple, contient des dispositions qui permettent, et même encouragent dans certains cas, la commercialisation des œuvres des créateurs sans l’obligation de leur accorder une rémunération équitable, ce qui va à l’encontre d’un de ses principes fondamentaux : assurer que les créateurs reçoivent une juste récompense pour l’utilisation de leurs œuvres.

Le gouvernement fédéral devrait prendre les mesures suivantes pour remédier à ces inégalités :

  1. Se concentrer sur les effets des lois et des exceptions en matière d’exemption de responsabilité

À l’instar de ses homologues internationaux, le gouvernement du Canada devrait examiner et réviser les lois et exceptions en matière d’exonération de responsabilité, leur application erronée par certaines entreprises spécialisées dans la technologue et les pratiques d’interfinancement qui ont été ajoutées à la Loi sur le droit d’auteur.

  1. Les industries créatives canadiennes réclament des réformes authentiques

Lors de l’examen quinquennal de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur qui doit débuter à la fin de 2017, le gouvernement devrait étudier l’ensemble des dispositions permettant à des tiers de commercialiser des œuvres créatives sans rémunérer équitablement les artistes, et ce, en plus de mettre fin à l’interfinancement.

  1. Éliminer l’exemption de redevances de 1,25 million $ de la radio commerciale

Depuis 1997, les stations de radio commerciales ne versent qu’une redevance nominale de 100 $ sur la partie de leurs recettes publicitaires annuelles qui ne dépasse pas 1,25 million $. Cette exemption devrait être éliminée. Elle revient à une subvention faite par les artistes à de vastes entreprises médiatiques verticalement intégrées.

  1. Modifier la définition d’« enregistrement sonore »

Dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, la musique enregistrée n’est pas reconnue comme étant un « enregistrement sonore » (et n’ouvre donc pas droit à rémunération) lorsqu’elle fait partie de la bande sonore d’une œuvre télévisuelle ou cinématographique. La définition devrait être modifiée pour permettre aux artistes-interprètes et aux créateurs de musique enregistrée de toucher des redevances lorsque leur musique fait partie de la bande sonore d’une œuvre télévisuelle ou cinématographique.

On peut télécharger le rapport intégral à ce lien.

 

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Music Canada applauds the Government of Canada for initiating consultations on Copyright Board of Canada reform

August 9, 2017, Toronto:  Music Canada applauds today’s announcement by The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, in conjunction with The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, that the government has launched a consultation process to reform the Copyright Board of Canada. The consultations will run until September 29, and will seek public feedback on ideas to make the Copyright Board’s processes more transparent and more efficient.

“Music Canada applauds Minister Bains and Minister Joly for beginning these consultations on Copyright Board reform,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “The time is right to modernize the Board, which will better support music creators and advance Canada’s innovation agenda. A more efficient and predictable regulatory environment will help spur growth for Canada’s cultural industries and the creative class.”

Music Canada has been a lead advocate for change at the Copyright Board. Music Canada participated in both the Senate hearings on the Copyright Board, and the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s Review of the Canadian Music Industry, appearing as a key stakeholder witness in favour of full and meaningful reforms. Graham Henderson also raised the issue in a recent Policy Options op-ed, and cited the repair of the Copyright Board as first priority for government to modernize in a speech before the Economic Club of Canada.

Today’s announcement follows the release of a 2016 report by the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce titled Copyright Board: A Rationale for Urgent Review. The thorough and comprehensive report concluded that the Board is “dated, dysfunctional and in dire need of reform.”

During the Senate committee hearings that led to the report, stakeholder and expert witnesses all identified the lack of timely decision-making as the biggest challenge in relation to the Board, and there was wide-spread consensus on the need for urgent, meaningful reform. The Senate report notes that, “On average, the Board may take between 3.5 and 7 years to make a final decision, the result of which is uncertainty and diminished economic activity within Canada’s cultural sector.”

Music Canada looks forward to continuing to work with government on this timely file to develop a regulatory framework for the Board that fosters innovation so that our cultural industries can thrive.

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For more information:

Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

 

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada.  Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

 

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Music Canada applauds Supreme Court of Canada decision confirming that Internet intermediaries can be ordered to deindex illegal sites worldwide

June 28, 2017, Toronto:  Music Canada welcomes today’s landmark Supreme Court of Canada decision in Equustek Solutions v. Google upholding a ruling that Google can no longer provide search results anywhere in the world that point to a website that unlawfully sells the intellectual property of another company. Music Canada joined several other creative industry associations as interveners supporting Equustek in the case.

The case establishes principles that will guide the responsibilities of Internet intermediaries to reduce or eliminate harms amplified by their activities.  In the case, Google admitted that it employs a team of more than 40 employees to remove search results to material that offend its company policies, but resisted a court order compelling it to do the same with respect to sites trafficking in goods created from stolen trade secrets.

The Supreme Court ordered Google to stop directing people to the illegal sites.  It rejected Google’s approach of only de-listing individual pages within sites, which a lower court described as promoting a “Whack-A-Mole” approach to online infringement. It also rejected Google’s claim that, as a non-party, it was “immune” to court orders. It concluded that Google was “the determinative player in allowing the harm to occur” and suggested it had a “duty to assist the person wronged”.

Importantly, today’s decision also ensured that the order applies worldwide and across all of Google’s search engines, a crucial development given that the Internet has largely dissolved boundaries between countries and allowed virtual wrongdoers to move from jurisdiction to jurisdiction in search of the weakest enforcement setting.

In particular, the Supreme Court emphasized:

“The problem in this case is occurring online and globally. The Internet has no borders – its natural habitat is global. The only way to ensure the interlocutory injunction [order] attained its objective was to have it apply where Google operates – globally.”

The only way to protect the plaintiff was to prevent the search results from being displayed where they do the most harm: on Google’s global search results.

Last, the Supreme Court concluded that freedom of expression concerns raised by Google and its supportive interveners were at best theoretical. The speech contained on the sites did not engage any freedom of expression values, but rather violated multiple court orders. The Supreme Court found that “most countries will likely recognize… the selling of pirated products as a legal wrong” and that freedom of expression does not require Google to engage in “the facilitation of the unlawful sale of goods.”

Music Canada, together with the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), has been actively involved in this case since it was first appealed to the British Columbia Court of Appeal. Both the Supreme Court and the British Columbia Court of Appeal referred to their assistance in rendering their decisions.

“Today’s decision confirms that online service providers cannot turn a blind eye to illegal activity that they facilitate; on the contrary, they have an affirmative duty to take steps to prevent the Internet from becoming a black market,” said Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada. “This is welcome news for creators of all stripes who rely on the Internet as their primary market and for whom illegal online activity can instantly wipe out careers and destroy investment in new releases. Today’s decision provides a vital remedy to address illegal online activities and enforce the rights of creators.”

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For more information:

Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada.  Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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Music is back on Parliament Hill as Scott Helman, Vincent Vallières take the stage at Capital Beat with special guest speaker The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage

OTTAWA, May 16, 2017:  Music Canada and Quebecor, as presenting sponsors, are excited to bring an intimate celebration of some of Canada’s best music and artists back to Parliament Hill on Tuesday, May 16, 2017. Also sponsored by TD Bank Group and Stingray Digital, Capital Beat will bring together parliamentarians, Hill staff and media for a non-partisan evening designed to celebrate Canadian music among Ottawa’s most important decision-makers. Capital Beat’s previous incarnation, Minister’s Music Night, was named by Maclean’s Magazine as one of the five events that matter most to Ottawa’s power brokers.

The event will take place in The Studio at the National Arts Centre (1 Elgin Street) and will include performances by Scott Helman and Vincent Vallières, as well as special guest speaker The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Following the breakout success of his debut Augusta EP in 2014, which includes the Platinum Single “Bungalow,” Scott Helman has just released his first full-length album Hôtel de Ville on Warner Music Canada and is currently on tour supporting his first single “Kinda Complicated.”

Sherbrooke’s own Vincent Vallières is a staple of the Quebec music scene. His 2009 album Le Monde tourne fort earned a Platinum certification, on the strength of his hit single On va s’aimer encore, which became an instant classic. Three years after Fabriquer l’aube, which earned a Gold certification, Vincent Vallières came out with his seventh album in March of this year, Le temps des vivants, whose first single “Bad Luck” is currently sitting atop the radio charts.

The two headliners will perform 45 minute sets followed by an afterparty at the National Arts Centre with music curated by DJ del Pilar.

“I’m so pleased that we are able to bring this intimate celebration of music back to Parliament Hill with a brand-new look,” said Amy Terrill, Executive Vice President of Music Canada. “Music is an essential part of Canada’s national identity and a significant economic contributor. Capital Beat is an incredible way to emphasize the value of music and the importance of Canada’s music creators.”

“It is both a pleasure and an honour for Québecor to help foster an exchange between artists, politicians and industry people but, most of all, we are happy to bring these remarkable musical talents to the attention of our nation’s parliamentarians,” said J.Serge Sasseville, Québecor’s Senior Vice President, Corporate and Institutional Affairs.

Capital Beat is an invitation only event. For more information or to RSVP, visit www.capitalbeat.ca.

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For more information:

Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Hugo Delaney, Québecor
hugo.delaney@quebecor.com
+1 (514) 463-5880

 

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada, namely Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada.  Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

About Quebecor

Quebecor, a Canadian leader in telecommunications, entertainment, news media and culture, is one of the best-performing integrated communications companies in the industry. Driven by their determination to deliver the best possible customer experience, all of Quebecor’s subsidiaries and brands are differentiated by their high-quality, multiplatform, convergent products and services.

Quebecor (TSX: QBR.A, QBR.B) is headquartered in Québec. It holds an 81.07% interest in Quebecor Media, which employs more than 10,000 people in Canada.

A family business founded in 1950, Quebecor is strongly committed to the community. Every year, it actively supports more than 400 organizations working in the vital fields of culture, health, education, the environment and entrepreneurship.

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La musique est de retour sur la colline du Parlement à Ottawa, où on pourra entendre Vincent Vallières et Scott Helman en concert ainsi qu’une allocution spéciale de l’honorable Mélanie Joly, ministre du Patrimoine canadien

OTTAWA, le 16 mai 2017 : Music Canada et Québecor, à titre de commanditaires présentateurs, sont enchantés de pouvoir faire vibrer une fois de plus la colline du Parlement au rythme de la musique et des artistes canadiens dans le cadre d’un concert intime qui sera présenté le mardi 16 mai 2017. Également commandité par le Groupe Banque TD et Stingray Digital, le concert Au rythme de la capitale rassemblera les parlementaires, le personnel politique et les médias lors d’une soirée non partisane conçue comme une célébration de la musique canadienne en présence des décideurs les plus importants de la capitale nationale. Dans sa première mouture, cet événement précédemment connu sous le nom de « Soirée de musique de la ministre », a été reconnu par le magazine Maclean’s comme l’un des cinq événements les plus importants aux yeux des acteurs les plus influents d’Ottawa.

Le spectacle, qui aura lieu au Studio du Centre national des Arts (1, rue Elgin), mettra en vedette les artistes Vincent Vallières et Scott Helman et comprendra une prise de parole de l’invitée d’honneur de la soirée, la ministre du Patrimoine canadien, l’honorable Mélanie Joly.

Originaire de Sherbrooke, Vincent Vallières est un incontournable de la scène musicale québécoise. Sortie en 2009, Le Monde tourne fort, a été certifié platine et le succès On va s’aimer encore est devenu un grand classique. Trois ans après la parution de Fabriquer l’aube, album certifié or, Vincent Vallières présentait en mars dernier son septième disque, Le temps des vivants, dont le premier extrait « Bad Luck » trône présentement au sommet des palmarès radio.

Dans le sillage du succès remarquable de son premier EP, Augusta (2014), qui renferme l’immense succès « Bungalow », certifié platine, Scott Helman vient de lancer son premier album complet, Hôtel de Ville, chez Warner Music Canada, et fait actuellement la promotion du premier extrait, « Kinda Complicated », en tournée.

Chaque vedette présentera une prestation de 45 minutes et le tout sera suivi d’une réception au Centre national des Arts sur des rythmes sélectionnés par DJ del Pilar.

« Je suis tellement heureuse que nous puissions ramener cette célébration musicale intime sur la colline du Parlement dans une présentation complètement nouvelle », a déclaré Amy Terrill, vice-présidente principale de Music Canada. « La musique est un aspect essentiel de l’identité nationale du Canada, et elle joue un rôle important dans l’économie. Le concert Au rythme de la capitale est une façon fantastique de souligner la valeur de la musique et l’importance des créateurs et créatrices de musique du Canada. »

« C’est un honneur et un plaisir pour Québecor de contribuer à créer un moment d’échange privilégié entre les artistes, les politiciens et les gens de l’industrie, et surtout, de mieux faire connaître nos remarquables talents musicaux aux parlementaires et aux autres décideurs de la capitale », souligne J.Serge Sasseville, vice-président principal, Affaires corporatives et institutionnelles de Québecor.

Au rythme de la capitale est un événement sur invitation seulement. Pour plus d’informations ou pour confirmer votre présence, rendez-vous sur www.aurythmedelacapitale.ca.

 

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Pour plus d’informations :

Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

Hugo Delaney, Québecor
hugo.delaney@quebecor.com
+1 (514) 463-5880

 

Au sujet de Music Canada

Music Canada est une association professionnelle à but non lucratif qui représente les grandes maisons de disques au Canada, notamment Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada et Warner Music Canada. Music Canada collabore également à la promotion et au développement du secteur musical en collaboration avec de nombreux chefs de file de l’industrie musicale indépendante – étiquettes et distributeurs de disques, studios d’enregistrement, salles de spectacles, diffuseurs de concerts, gérants et artistes – à la promotion et au développement du secteur musical.

Au sujet de Québecor

Chef de file canadien des télécommunications, du divertissement, des médias d’information et de la culture, Québecor est l’une des entreprises de communication intégrée les plus performantes de l’industrie. Portées par la volonté de faire vivre la meilleure expérience qui soit à ses clients, toutes les filiales et marques de Québecor se distinguent par une offre de produits et services de qualité, multiplateformes et convergents.

Québecor (TSX : QBR.A, QBR.B), dont le siège social est solidement implanté au Québec, détient une participation de 81,07 % dans Québecor Média, laquelle emploie plus de 10 000 personnes au Canada.

Entreprise familiale fondée en 1950, Québecor a à cœur de s’impliquer activement dans sa communauté. Chaque année, elle s’investit auprès des gens qui œuvrent au sein de plus de 400 organismes dans des domaines aussi essentiels que sont la culture, la santé, l’éducation, l’environnement et l’entrepreneuriat.

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New report calls for development of an Atlantic Canada Music Strategy

A new report unveiled during the 2017 East Coast Music Awards: Festival and Conference today calls for the need to develop an Atlantic Canadian Music Strategy in an effort to strengthen the future of the region’s music sector.

Striking A New A-Chord, a report spearheaded by the East Coast Music Association (ECMA), Music Canada, and Music Canada Live, emphasizes that concentrated investment in the music industry is beneficial not only for those who work in the sector, but ultimately for the region as a whole.

“Music is fundamentally linked to Atlantic Canadian culture,” says Andy McLean, Executive Director of the ECMA. “This report clearly shows that – in addition to bolstering that identity – supporting this sector means helping small businesses, creating opportunities to attract and retain youth employment, and developing our artists to compete at an international level. The first step to harnessing these opportunities is creating a pan-Atlantic strategy.”

Delivered during a presentation at the Saint John Trade & Convention Centre this afternoon titled Stronger Together, the report also marks a landmark partnership between all five music industry associations – Musique/Music NB, Music Nova Scotia, Music NL, Music PEI, and the Cape Breton Music Industry Cooperative – who have committed to working with the ECMA, Music Canada, and Music Canada Live to establish this regional strategy.

“Atlantic Canada has one of the richest, most important – but fragile – music scenes in the country. Creating and executing a region-wide strategy will ensure the true economic, social and cultural potential of the industry, and its countless benefits for cities and towns, can be realized,” says Erin Benjamin, Executive Director of Music Canada Live. “This is an historic moment in the timeline of East Coast music, and huge milestone for all of the associations involved. Congratulations, Music Canada Live looks forward to supporting the hard work ahead.”

The report, which was officially commissioned at last year’s ECMAs in Sydney, NS, underscores a number of challenges facing musicians and industry professionals in Atlantic Canada including stringent liquor laws, changing business models in the industry, restrictions on live venues, and lack of industry infrastructure. The latter is a key focus for the proposed strategy, calling the shortage of music publishing companies, agents, publicists, bookers, and artist managers in the region “alarming.”

Among other recommendations, Striking A New A-Chord also calls for the development of an Atlantic Canadian Music Fund that would seek to provide resources to complement existing programs, attract investment, and develop and incentivize musicians and music related businesses to reinvest in Atlantic Canada.

“Targeted investments in other parts of Canada have strengthened those music communities and stimulated additional private spending as well, leading to increased activity in the sector,” says Amy Terrill, Executive Vice President of Music Canada. “We look forward to working with government and industry stakeholders to find ways to complement the existing programs available to the music community in Atlantic Canada in order to create a stronger, more sustainable Atlantic music sector.”

The entire Striking A New A-Chord report is available to read HERE.

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Canada climbs to sixth largest global recorded music market in IFPI’s Global Music Report 2017

Toronto, ON – April 25, 2017:   Today the International Federation for the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) released its Global Music Report 2017, which shows Canada is now the sixth largest recorded music market on the planet, surpassing Australia.

The annual Global Music Report compiles revenues from physical and digital sales, streaming, synchronization and performance rights, to provide a ‘state of the industry’ snapshot while highlighting innovation and investment within the industry as it progresses further into the digital age.

Highlights of Canada’s 2016 music revenues:

  • Overall recorded music revenues rose 12.8% in 2016 and totalled CAD $489.4 million
  • Digital music revenues accounted for 63% of recorded music revenues in 2016
  • Total streaming revenues, including subscription and ad-supported streaming, more than doubled in 2016, rising from USD $49.82 million to an impressive USD $127.8 million
  • Subscription audio streaming generated the majority of all streaming revenues in 2016 at USD $94.45 million, compared to USD $15.72 million from ad-supported audio streaming and USD $17.59 million from video streams
  • Digital revenues grew to USD $233 million in 2016, up from USD $170 million in 2015
  • Revenues from physical sales continue to decline, falling to USD $99 million in 2016 from USD $114.4 million in 2015

Though music consumption around the world continues to rise to never-before-seen levels, the “value gap” remains a significant problem, as the revenues returned to music creators have not kept pace with music consumption.

“I am happy to see Canada regain its position as the sixth largest recorded music market in the world,” said Amy Terrill, Executive Vice President of Music Canada. “While the growth in overall revenues, driven by a huge increase in subscription audio streams is very encouraging, the music community must remain united and vigilant in fixing the value gap. I urge the Canadian federal government to put creators first in any future policy decisions, such as the upcoming Copyright Act review in 2017, so that creators can be properly compensated for the record levels of music consumption we’re witnessing.”

“The whole music community is uniting in its effort to campaign for a legislative fix to the value gap and we are calling on policymakers to do this,” said Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI, in the report release. “For music to thrive in a digital world, there must be a fair digital marketplace.”

Key figures from global recorded music revenues:

  • Global revenue growth: +5.9%
  • Digital share of global revenues: 50%
  • Digital revenue growth: +17.7%
  • Growth in streaming revenues +60.4%
  • Physical revenues: -7.6%
  • Download revenue: -20.5%

Canada’s ascension to the sixth largest market follows IFPI’s announcement in February that Drake was named Global Recording Artist of 2016. Justin Bieber and The Weeknd took the number five and number ten spots, respectively, as Canadians occupied three of the top 10 positions.

Today’s Global Music Report 2017 shows that albums by Canadian artists performed very well at home in 2016, with six of the top ten album spots occupied by Canadian artists, including Drake’s Views at number one. Other Canadians in the top albums chart include Céline Dion, Leonard Cohen, Justin Bieber, The Weeknd, and The Tragically Hip.

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