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Posts by Quentin Burgess (172)

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OMDC announces key dates for Ontario Music Fund program Years 2 and 3

The Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC) has announced the key dates for years 2 and 3 of the Ontario Music Fund.

As per the release, application launch dates, deadlines, and funding decisions timelines for the four streams of the Ontario Music Fund are as follows:

Music Company Development:
Year 2 (2014 – 15)

  • Application launch: Early April 2014
  • Deadline: May 30, 2014
  • Activity period: July 1, 2014 -July 31, 2015
  • Funding decisions: Early September, 2014

Year 3 (2015-16)

  • Application launch: Mid-March, 2015
  • Deadline: May 15, 2015
  • Activity period: July 1, 2015 –July 31, 2016
  • Funding decisions: Mid-September, 2015

Music Industry Development:
Year 2 (2014-15)

  • Application launch: Early May, 2014
  • Deadline: December 31, 2014
  • Activity period: April 1, 2014–May 31, 2015
  • Funding decisions: ongoing to late January/Early February, 2015

Year 3 (2015 – 16)

  • Application launch: Early March, 2015
  • Deadline: December 31, 2015
  • Activity period: April 1, 2015 – May 31, 2016
  • Funding decisions: ongoing to late January/Early February, 2016

Live Music:
Year 2 (2014 – 15)

  • Application launch: Mid – April 2014
  • Deadline: June 16, 2014
  • Activity period: August 1, 2014 – August 31, 2015
  • Funding decisions: Mid – September, 2014

Year 3 (2015 – 16)

  • Application launch: Early March, 2015
  • Deadline: April 30, 2015
  • Activity period: July 1, 2015 –August 31, 2016
  • Funding decisions: End of July, 2015

Music Futures:
Year 2 (2014 – 15)

  • Application launch: Early May 2014
  • Deadline: June 30, 2014
  • Activity period: May1, 2014 –May 1, 2015
  • Funding decisions: Late September, 2014

Year 3 (2015 – 16)

  • Application launch: Mid – March, 2015
  • Deadline: May 29, 2015
  • Activity period: April 1, 2015 –April 1, 2016
  • Funding decisions: Early September, 2015

For further information on the Ontario Music Fund, visit the OMDC’s website at http://www.omdc.on.ca/music/the_ontario_music_fund.htm.

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Music Remains – A Recorded Music Rube Goldberg Machine

The IFPI has released a new film called Music Remains that illustrates that throughout all of the technological changes in our industry, there has been one constant: the music.

Shot at historic Abbey Roads studios, this compelling 90 second video features a Rube Goldberg machine showing various recorded music technologies.

Launched today, MusicRemains.org features the video, a ‘making of’ documentary, and lyrics of the rap in the video.

“The idea was to convey the message that, while technology may be continuously changing, recorded music is always at the centre of people’s lives”, says creative director Steve Milbourne. “At the same time, we wanted to it to be a very personal story. Pepstar’s lyrics are about key experiences – from the meeting of our parents to childhood memories, first girlfriends and family tragedy.”

Check out the video and feel free to share it using the hashtag #MusicRemains.

 

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Blue Rodeo named official 2014 Record Store Day Spokesband by Record Store Day Canada

Record Store Day Canada has named Blue Rodeo the official spokesband for Record Store Day 2014, happening April 19, 2014 at independent record stores across Canada and the world.

The JUNO Award winning and multi-platinum certified band waxed poetic on their love for record stores in a new video released by Record Store Day Canada.

“When my kids began to develop their own unique tastes in music I took them to their first independent record store. It was like a whole new world had opened to them. The fact of the matter is those record stores are so much more than just merchandise sellers. They are a social service. Like-minded people sharing their love and knowledge of music. My children have never lost their connection to independent record stores and their knowledge of music is now broad and unique”, said Jim Cuddy in a release.

“Growing up, records were our religion. They were our statements of cool. We carried them from party to party, rec room to rec room, symbols of our hipness. It’s funny, things haven’t changed that much. Go buy some records. Take a trip!”, added Greg Keelor.

Earlier this week, Record Store Day announced hip-hop artist and social activist Chuck D would be the official Ambassador of Record Store Day 2014 south of the border, following in the footsteps of past ambassadors Josh Homme, Ozzy Osbourne, Iggy Pop, and Jack White.

Last year’s Record Store Day was the largest yet in Canada, with more than 150 stores from across Canada are celebrating, with stores in all 10 provinces taking part. More information on this year’s celebration, including in-store performances and special release vinyl will be released as it becomes available.

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In Australia, Victorian Coalition Government announces red tape reduction reforms to boost live music sector

Today in Australia, the Victoria Coalition Government announced a series of red tape reduction reforms in an effort to boost productivity and reduce costs for businesses in the state, including reforms for live music venues.

The reforms will make it easier for venues to host live music by easing unnecessary regulations related to liquor licenses.

”The hospitality sector will see the removal of an unnecessary regulation that requires liquor licensees to apply for approval to hold alcohol-free underage concerts on licensed premises, while other processes, including those around hosting live music, will be simplified,” said acting Premier and Minister for State Development Peter Ryan.

The main reforms affecting music include:

Under age venues : Currently licensees must obtain approval to hold alcohol-free underage and mix-aged live music events on licensed premises. This reform will remove that requirement

Small live music venues: Currently small live music venues wishing to undertake work to adapt or renovate to host live venues music attract permit and approval requirements based on the Building Code of Australia, Building Classification 9(b). This reform will simplify and reduce planning approval for change of land use for small venues seeking to host live music.

Temporary liquor licences: Currently a temporary limited liquor licence application must be lodged at least 8 weeks before an event. This reform will streamline the approval process for temporary liquor licences and examine the feasibility of introducing a notification process for repeat and low risk events run by licensees with a sound reputation.

The government has also promised to do whatever it can to implement an “agent-of-change” planning principle that would require residents who move into an area with established live music venues to foot the bill for any desired soundproofing.

Calling live music “one of Melbourne’s greatest tourism and cultural assets,’ Planning Minister Matthew Guy said the government would find a way to “give certainty” to the live music industry and its patrons.

Victoria’s State Government says the reforms were accepted following extensive consultation by Red Tape Commissioner John Lloyd, who met with 25 associations, including Music Victoria .

Over a year ago, Music Canada’s report highlighting the best practices in Austin, Texas hit Melbourne’s radar prompting city officials to contact Austin to learn more about their success .

Red Tape issues persist in Canadian live music sector:

In Toronto, some examples include:

  • Ambiguous licensing requirements: in response to concerns about dance clubs, the city created a new “entertainment license” that is not supposed to apply to live music venues, and yet, numerous venues have been fined for not having one.
  • Approvals for road closures often take many months, even for festivals that have a long track record.
  • Some public spaces are governed by Transportation, others by Parks Forestry Recreation. Lines of delineation are not clear.
  • Postering bylaw is ill-conceived and poorly enforced, with little understanding by City staff and bylaw enforcement personnel.

Music Canada and our partners in the live music sector have been advocating for the reduction in red tape at all three levels of government. Federally, we remain concerned about the effect of recent changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker program that reduce the ability of bars and restaurants to hire international performers. We were pleased to see red tape reduction in the music sector identified as a priority in a recent whitepaper from the Ontario PC party. In Toronto, the establishment of the new Toronto Music Industry Advisory Council is a significant achievement for the music community, promising an opportunity to address concerns.

Music Canada is continuing to advocate for the creation of a Music Office at Toronto City Hall, which was one of the recommendations outlined in our aforementioned report, Accelerating Toronto’s Music Industry Growth – Leveraging Best Practices from Austin, Texas , commissioned and released by Music Canada in 2012. A Music Office would “create a valuable alignment between the City and the commercial music industry in Toronto,” the report found.

The Music Office could provide coordination across the various city departments that deal with issues relating to live music events and venues, as well as act as an Ombudsman and clearing house for music business operators. The report notes this could make a significant impact in “re-engineering the business/government interface to stimulate job creation and investment attraction,” one of key recommendations made by the Toronto Prosperity Institute’s 2011 report, Establishing The Path To Growth . The Music Office could also play a strong business development role, stimulating the growth of activity in the music sector.

The groundwork for a Music Office has already been laid; the City of Toronto recently issued a job posting for a Sector Development Officer (Music) , working in the Economic Development & Culture division.

We will share today’s news out of Australia with our government contacts, and continue to advocate for music in Canada in 2014.

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2013 a banner year for Music Canada’s advocacy efforts

2013 was a banner year for Music Canada’s advocacy efforts, with Toronto City Council, the Government of Ontario, and the Government of Canada all showing they recognize the value of the Canadian music sector, with all levels taking several concrete steps to grow the industry.

Toronto:

In Toronto, 2013 began with a landmark commitment to arts funding, as the 2013 Capital and Operating Budgets include a boost in arts funding derived from the billboard tax. Toronto artists celebrated as the Executive Committee endorsed a plan to increase funding to $25 per capita on arts programs and grants by 2016. Among the priorities listed in the motion put forward to the Executive Committee by Councillor Gary Crawford was “support for Toronto’s music cluster.” Unfortunately, in November, a City staff report recommended pushing back the target to 2018, although Councillor Crawford said he believes the 2016 target is still attainable, and plans to put forward a motion before the 2014 budget is finalized to phase in the funding by 2016.

In June, artists and musicians joined leaders from music, tourism and City Hall to launch 4479 – a campaign to position Toronto as one of the greatest music cities in the world. 4479 is designed to promote Toronto as a world leader in live and recorded music and also to build a community that engages artists, industry supporters and fans who share the vision of Toronto as a vibrant and diverse music city.

Later in June, Austin City Council voted in favour of a music city alliance with Toronto, creating the catalyst for the partnership between the two cities.

In July, Toronto City Council responded in kind, unanimously supporting a motion to establish a Music City Alliance with Austin. Members of Toronto’s music community expressed strong support for the alliance in a release issued by the 4479 campaign.

The 4479 website officially launched in September, with a video showcasing Toronto’s world class music scene, and advocacy tools and campaigns to encourage Toronto city councillors to “say yes to music” at upcoming votes at City Council.

The Alliance was made official in October , during a music and cultural business mission led by Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, Councillors Gary Crawford, Josh Colle, Doug Ford, and Michael Thompson, as well as representatives from the music sector, travelled to Austin, Texas.

The Alliance agreement states that the two cities will “work collaboratively to develop and expand all elements of the music industry, including but not limited to artists, venues, festivals, studios, management and promotion.”

The groundwork for a Music Office at City Hall was laid in October, when the City of Toronto issued a job posting for a Sector Development Officer (Music) , working in the Economic Development & Culture division. The creation of this position is an important milestone as it sends a clear signal that the city now regards music as an important economic sector. The creation of a Music Office at City Hall was one of the recommendations outlined in the Accelerating Toronto’s Music Industry Growth – Leveraging Best Practices from Austin, Texas report, commissioned by Music Canada.

Also in October, Toronto City Council voted unanimously to request the Federal Government extend the Temporary Worker Fee exemptions for musicians to all venues, including bars, restaurants and coffee shops, adding weight to the concerns raised throughout the music community.

In November, Toronto’s Economic Development Committee voted unanimously to adopt the Terms of Reference for a Toronto Music Industry Advisory Council. The City of Toronto then solicited applications for membership on the Council, with an invitation to apply, membership application, and background materials posted on the City of Toronto’s website .

This week, Toronto City Council has approved the establishment of the new Toronto Music Industry Advisory Council , marking a significant success for the music community.

According to the staff report, the “Toronto Music Industry Advisory Council will provide a forum for the discussion of opportunities and challenges, exchange of ideas, input and advice, and collaborative development of recommendations and a unifying voice to advance the music sector in Toronto.”

Ontario:

Ontario made it clear in 2013 that the province recognizes music is an integral part of Ontario’s cultural landscape and an innovative economic driver:

In January, the Hon. Michael Chan, Minister of Tourism, Culture, and Sport, announced that the government of Ontario would be developing a live music strategy that will strengthen the province’s position as a global leader for live music.

Minister Chan made the announcement at an event at Toronto’s legendary Horseshoe Tavern, which featured performances by DJ Clymaxxx, The Good Lovelies, and the Skydiggers. The room was packed with leaders from the live and recorded music sectors as well as artists and musicians. Minister Chan also announced an Industry Working Group to develop the strategy and strengthen Ontario’s position as a global capital for live music.

Minister Chan’s announcement was buoyed by a report from the Ontario Arts Council, who released the Ontario Arts and Culture Tourism Profile in January. The report provides a comprehensive profile of Ontario’s arts and culture tourists and their economic impact. The report shows that arts and culture tourism has a significant economic impact in Ontario, with arts/culture tourist spending generating $3.7 billion in GDP in Ontario in 2010, supporting 67,000 jobs and $2.4 billion in wages and generating $1.7 billion in taxes for all levels of government.

The music industry was recognized as a key economic driver during the Ontario Liberal leadership debate in January, as Kathleen Wynne noted that the music industry is “absolutely an important economic driver for the GTA, for the City of Toronto.”

In February, Premier Wynne highlighted the music sector in a key economic section of the Speech from the Throne, among traditional Ontario powerhouse industries like agriculture and the automotive sector.

In May, the Ontario government announced plans to create the Ontario Music Fund that would help support and create jobs and position the province as a leading place to record and perform music. Speaking at Lee’s Palace, Finance Minister Charles Sousa revealed that the new Ontario Music Fund is a proposed $45 million grant program over three years, starting in 2013-14.

Premier Kathleen Wynne spoke at Music Canada’s Annual General Meeting in July, where she expressed her desire to make Ontario a place where artists and musicians can succeed. She reaffirmed her government’s commitment to the Ontario Music Fund and the Live Music Strategy, emphasizing the importance of music to our economy and our culture.

In August, the Ontario government launched its Pan Am and Parapan Am Games Promotion, Celebration and Legacy Strategy, which aims to increase the economic benefits of the 2015 Games and support them in becoming the People’s Games. A key part of the strategy is a plan to celebrate and showcase Ontario talent from “the stage to the stadium” in local communities. This includes enhancing support for live music, celebrations and festivals, adding to Ontario’s reputation as a live music destination.

The Ontario Music Fund was officially launched in October, with the Honourable Michael Chan, Minister of Tourism, Culture, and Sport making the announcement at Revolution Recording studio in Toronto. As per the release, the new fund will support Ontario-based music companies and music production and distribution through four streams:

The Ontario Music Fund is administrated by the Ontario Music Office, with more information available on their website.

Canada:

In July, Prime Minister Stephen Harper named The Honourable Shelley Glover as Minister of Canadian Heritage, with the Honourable James Moore moving to a new role as Minister of Industry Canada.

Both Minister Glover and Minister Moore underscored music’s importance to Canadian culture and Canada’s economy at two Minister’s Music Nights in 2013, which were produced by Music Canada and Quebecor.

The most recent event was hosted by the Honourable Shelly Glover, and featured terrific performances by Kaïn & Brett Kissel at the Museum of Civilization (History). The event also featured music from students of Hillcrest High School, an Ottawa, ON, school that features music education as a key part of their community and curriculum.
At the event, Minister Glover spoke passionately about the talent and diversity of Canada’s music scene, as well as the economic and cultural benefits of our music sector.
“I have always been very impressed by the talent and diversity of the artists who shape the music scene in Canada. I am particularly inspired by the number of talented young artists who keep music new and exciting,” said Minister Glover. “Canada’s recording industry is the seventh-largest in the world, generating almost $3 billion in economic activity every year. Thanks to the talent and creativity of our artists, Canada is the third-largest exporter of musical talent in the world.”

Back in February, then-Heritage Minister James Moore hosted invited guests at the National Arts Centre as Johnny Reid and Étienne Drapeau performed. Prior to the concert, both artists toured Parliament Hill with Minister Moore, and met with several MPs and Senators in a reception hosted by The Honourable Andrew Scheer, Speaker of the House of Commons.

In August, Music Canada expressed concern about changes to the Temporary Foreign Workers program that affect some Canadian music venues featuring international performers. It is our belief that these impacts are unintended consequences of regulations designed to protect jobs for Canadians. While this policy is borne out of a valid concern for Canadian employment, it will reduce the ability of bars and restaurants that host live music to hire international performers. Music Canada is optimistic that insightful exceptions can be extended to musicians performing in all venues, and look forward to the resolution of this issue.

Looking back, 2013 was a banner year for Music Canada’s advocacy efforts in Toronto, Ontario, and Canada, which we hope will lead to greater opportunities for Canadian artists and musicians and the teams that work with them. With all levels of government taking several concrete steps towards growing our music sector this year, the stage is set for a terrific 2014.

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Ontario Music Fund launched to help support and create jobs, and position the province as a leading destination to record and perform

The Ontario Music Fund was officially launched today, which will help support create jobs in Ontario’s music industry, and position the province as a leading destination to record and perform. The announcement was made by the Hon. Michael Chan, Minister of Tourism, Culture, and Sport, at Revolution Recordings studio in Toronto. 

As per the release, the new fund will support Ontario-based music companies and music production and distribution through four streams: 

  • Music Company Development – Helps Ontario-based music companies increase recording, production and marketing, which boosts sales of music and supports job creation.
  • Music Industry Development – Provides support for initiatives such as digital innovation, music training and new approaches to increase home-grown music exports.
  • Music Futures– Helps leverage Ontario’s diverse and emerging music industry by supporting small music companies and artist entrepreneurs, for example those who create music and also handle the business and promotion of their music.
  • Live Music– Helps increase the number of live music events in the province and generates more opportunities for new and emerging local artists — boosting tourism and growing local economies.

“Our government is proud to partner with our music industry through the new Ontario Music Fund that will capitalize on our infrastructure, critical mass and competitive edge to drive economic growth and jobs,” said Minister Chan. “Home to the largest and most diverse music industry in the nation, we are committed to amplifying our success on the world stage and place Ontario on the map as a cultural and creative capital.”

“Music is a superpower that’s primed and ready to perform for Ontario. It’s a smart investment given the globally competitive advantage we have in the recorded and live music sectors,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “Research has shown that targeted support for music will pay off with enormous dividends including job growth, increased investment, tourism and the transformation of Ontario into one of the recording capitals of the world. As we in the music community like to say, music can help.”

Applications for the Ontario Music Fund are open now, and can be made through the OMDC Online Application Portal at https://apply.omdc.on.ca/. Applications may be submitted on an ongoing basis until January 31, 2014.

At today’s event, Kim Cooke, owner of Revolution Recordings, introduced Minister Chan, saying it’s “important to acknowledge Minister Chan and his staff. In tough times, with a major workload and competing demands, he has fought hard for the cultural sector and embraced the Ontario Music Fund file with vigour.” OMFCooke

“Ontario has proven itself as a powerhouse competitor with other jurisdictions across a wide range of creative industries. The Ontario Music Fund will help us to build an even stronger music industry in the province and to ensure that our music continues to reach global audiences,” said Kevin Shea, Chair, Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC).

OMFShea
Artists Kardinal Offishall and Ladies of the Canyon were on hand for today’s announcement, as well as a wide range of industry stakeholders, including representatives from Music Canada, the Canadian Independent Music Association, The JUNO Awards, Polaris Music Prize, Music Managers Forum, and all of Canada’s major record labels. OMFChanKardinall

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National music organizations join voices to oppose cuts to TDSB music programs

The Coalition for Music Education, Music Canada and MusiCounts believe in the importance of music education for all young people in schools. We are joining our voices together to urge the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) to keep providing a comprehensive education that includes quality music instruction for all students, taught by individuals with a background and training in music. We strongly disagree with any reduction to music in schools and ask – what is the TDSB’s vision and plan to maintain quality music programs in TDSB schools for all students?Research has proven that music education provides far-reaching benefits to the lives of young Canadians, to our communities and to our culture. We believe that decisions minimizing any aspect of the TDSB’s music program will have a long-term negative impact on the lives of Toronto students and on the community.

Music is essential to education and to life.
Music education:

  • teaches students to think creatively and critically,
  • develops skills that are essential in the 21st century workforce,
  • opens students’ minds to diverse perspectives and thinking,
  • bridges languages, cultures and generations,
  • unites us through shared experiences,
  • enriches our sense of beauty and imagination, and
  • supports student success.

The Coalition for Music Education annually celebrates the importance of learning music in our schools
through a national event titled Music Monday. This year’s Showcase Concert in Toronto included a live
link with Commander Hadfield in the International Space Station, who said, “Everybody should be
learning music. Music opens doors. And music stimulates the brain. Music helps organize and even
wire your brain…Music education is really important in life. It’s a wonderful and applicable skill that
only makes you a more capable human – We should all learn music.”

Music Canada has identified music education as one of five critical components for the development of the music industry in Canada and points out that the recently announced Ontario Music Fund (OMF) sends a clear message from the government that it values the contributions of the music community and that it thinks music is a sound investment. “There is vast evidence that music education contributes to the broader development of young minds and more well-rounded citizens,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “Music is a great equalizer, bridging all cultures, and languages.”

MusiCounts is helping keep music alive in our schools. This year MusiCounts awarded over $1 million in grants and scholarships to schools and communities in Canada. MusiCounts’ mission is to ensure that children in Canada, regardless of socio-economic circumstances or cultural background, have access to a music program through their school. “Every child deserves the opportunity to experience and benefit from playing an instrument.” says Allan Reid, Director, MusiCounts. “Music can and does change lives.”

We urge decision-makers to maintain quality music programs in the TDSB.

About the Coalition for Music Education:
The Coalition for Music Education works to raise awareness and understanding of the role music education plays in Canadian Culture, and to promote the benefits music education brings to young people.
We envision Canada as a country where the lives of all children are enriched by quality school music programs, and where their active participation in music is valued and supported in our communities.

For more information about the Coalition, please visit MusicMakesUs.

For more information contact:
Holly Nimmons, Executive Director
(416) 371-6486 | holly@musicmakesus.ca

About Music Canada:
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization founded in 1964 that promotes the interests of its members as well as their partners, the artists. Music Canada is a passionate advocate for music and those who create it. Music Canada also works closely with recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters and managers in the promotion and development of the music cluster.
For more information about Music Canada, please visit Music Canada

For more information, contact:
Amy Terrill, Vice-President, Public Affairs
(416) 967-7272 ext 103 | aterrill@musiccanada.com

About MusiCounts:
MusiCounts, Canada’s music education charity associated with The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS), is helping to keep music alive in schools across Canada. MusiCounts’ mission is to ensure that children in Canada, regardless of socio-economic circumstances or cultural
background, have access to a music program through their school. MusiCounts includes Band Aid musical instrument grants, the MusiCounts Teacher of the Year Award, Scholarships, and other music education initiatives.

For more information about MusiCounts, please visit MusiCounts

For more information, contact:
Allan Reid, Director
(416) 485-3135 ext 228 | allan@musicounts.ca

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Media Advisory: Toronto music campaign to be launched at NXNE

Toronto, June 11, 2013: A campaign to position Toronto as one of the greatest music cities in the world will be launched at NXNE just one year after the concept was first discussed at the event. A study comparing Toronto to Austin Texas was released at NXNE by Music Canada in 2012 recommending, among other things, an industry-led initiative to brand the city’s music scene.

That brand will be revealed on June 13 by a panel consisting of:

Graham Henderson, Music Canada
Josh Colle, Toronto City Councillor
Mike Tanner, NXNE
Jesse Kumagai, The Corporation of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall
Andrew Weir, Tourism Toronto

The Toronto music city campaign will activate artists, industry supporters, and fans of the Toronto music community in order to create more awareness about Toronto’s music scene, more opportunities for live music in Toronto and a more music-friendly City Hall.

When: Thursday, June 13 @ 4:15 pm
Where: NXNE Interactive, The Hyatt Regency, 370 King Street West, Room: Regency D

To arrange interviews, please contact Amy Terrill at aterrill@musiccanada.com or 416-967-7272 x 103.

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For more information:

Music Canada Media Contact: Amy Terrill 647-963-6044 aterrill@musiccanada.com 647-963-6044

NXNE Media Contact FLIP PUBLICITY Damien Nelson 416.533.7710 X221 damien@flip-publicity.com

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Global Forum 2013: Brand Supported Piracy with David Lowery, Chris Ruen, and Chris Castle

Writer and musician David Lowery and Author Chris Ruen do not shy away from identifying major companies that support the pirate sites that damage creators every day by distributing unlicensed copies of music and movies.

On March 22, 2013 at Canadian Music Week’s Global Forum, the pair will discuss brand-sponsored piracy, a practice whereby Fortune 500 companies, whether knowingly or unknowingly, purchase advertising inventory from illegal sites. Advertising revenues keep these sites in business while ad agencies, exchanges and networks also make money in the process. The only ones left without compensation are the artists, songwriters and filmmakers.

David Lowery of the bands Cracker and Camper Van Beethoven, has emerged as one of the strongest artist advocates through his contributions to the blog, The Trichordist. The blog has begun a “name and shame” campaign which identifies major brands that are supporting piracy by placing ads on illegal sites.

Chris Ruen, whose essays and criticism have appeared in The New York Times, Slate, The New York Press and Stereogum, recently published his first book, Freeloading: How Our Insatiable Appetite For Free Content Is Starving Creativity.

First brought to the attention of CMW delegates in 2011 by indie filmmaker Ellen Seidler, brand-sponsored piracy will be discussed during the Global Forum Networking Breakfast, a ticketed event, with moderator Chris Castle. David Lowery and Chris Ruen will be available for one-on-one interviews upon request.

For ticket and registration details, please visit www.cmw.net, or visit the registration office onsite at the Toronto Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre Hotel during posted hours.

The Global Forum is sponsored by Music Canada.

Update: Video from the Global Forum is now available below:

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Ontario Arts Council releases comprehensive profile of Ontario’s Arts and Culture Tourists and Their Economic Impact

Today, the Ontario Arts Council (OAC) released the Ontario Arts and Culture Tourism Profile, a report conducted by Research Resolutions & Consulting Ltd. and commissioned by the OAC. The report provides a comprehensive profile of Ontario’s arts and culture tourists and their economic impact. 

The report finds that 9.5 million overnight tourists participated in arts and culture activities in 2010, representing over one fifth of the 42.8 million overnight trips to Ontario that year. Of those 9.5 million arts and culture tourists, 66% were Canadian, 23% were American, and 1.1 million were from overseas. Arts and culture was a major draw for international tourists, with arts and culture tourists representing 39% of all American overnight visitors to Ontario in 2010, while 63% of tourists from overseas took part in arts and culture activity while visiting Ontario. 

The OAC report shows that arts and culture tourism has a significant economic impact in Ontario, with arts/culture tourist spending generating $3.7 billion in GDP in Ontario in 2010, supporting 67,000 jobs and $2.4 billion in wages and generating $1.7 billion in taxes for all levels of government. 

For more than 44% of the 20.8 million North Americans travelling to Ontario, at least one arts and culture activity was the main reason for their trip. 

Music was a major driver of Ontario tourism, as 6.5 million North American tourists took in music performances including classic, jazz, opera, popular/rock ‘n roll and country while visiting the province, making up approximately 31% of all North American tourists to Ontario. Music performances were the largest tourism driver among all Arts activities, with more attending concerts than theatre, art galleries, or ballet.

Of the 6.5 million tourists who attended music performances in Ontario, 44% of them said that the concert was their primary reason for traveling to Ontario, comprising a total of 2.9 million tourists who said that a concert was their main reason for traveling to Ontario.

The report also found that Arts festivals such as international film festivals, music, and/or literary festivals, drew 3.8 million tourists to Ontario. Music festivals were by far the biggest draw among Arts festivals, attracting 54% of these fans. The report says that “apart from music festivals, theatre is the only arts/culture trip driver to attract at least one third of group members (37%).”
While taking in arts and cultural activities, Ontario’s North American tourists also participate in many other types of activities during their trip, with 84% of them also participating in Outdoor experiences such as a nature park, and 75% of these tourists adding Shopping as part of their trip.

The Music Performance tourist group had the highest proportion of younger tourists (18 – 34 years) among all groups surveyed, with 36% of respondents in the younger age range, compared to 30% in the tourism market as a whole. 
The report also shows that the value of arts and culture overnight tourists is high, with arts and culture tourists outspending typical overnight tourists in Ontario by nearly two-to-one, spending $667 per trip in Ontario, compared to $374 spent by the typical overnight tourist.

The economic benefits of arts and culture tourists reach many other sectors, the report shows: 

  • Arts and culture tourists contributed $1.1 billion to the lodging sector, close to two-fifths of all spending on lodging by overnight tourists during the year (38%)
  • Arts and culture overnight tourists spent $1.1 billion on food and beverages, making up one-third of all overnight spending by overnight tourists (34%)
  • Arts and culture overnight tourists contributed $0.6 billion to the retail sector, or two-fifths of all spending by overnight tourists in Ontario (43%)
  • Over half of all spending by overnight tourists in Ontario came from arts and culture tourists (51%), who contributed $0.5 billion

In an OAC release, Michael Chan, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport said “Cultural tourism is a powerful force that is transforming global travel and trends. Our diverse arts, culture and heritage has helped us attract visitors from within our borders and beyond to explore and experience our exciting province. Our government is committed to evolving our tourism strategy to align with our cultural assets – for example, harnessing live music experiences that will drive our economy and firmly place Ontario on the international map as a premier cultural travel destination.”

“The conclusions that can be drawn from this ground-breaking study confirm that the instincts and vision of Minister Michael Chan are bang on,” said Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “Despite the fact that music tourism has never been seriously promoted in Ontario in its history, among ALL arts activities, music remains the largest driver of tourism. It is also worth noting that music is an essential underpinning for cultural events perhaps not categorized as a music event; Toronto’s Caribbean Carnival, for example. We might also have regard to the category of “Arts Festivals.” Within this category, music festivals outclass all other sectors by a substantial margin.

And this is all without a PLAN or any focus. As our Austin study has shown, when a city or state puts its mind to it and develops a strategy, great things happen. In 5 short years, the economic impact of music in Austin jumped from $616 million to $1.3 billion. Fortunately, that is all about to change for Ontario, and the music community eagerly awaits the announcement by Minister Chan tomorrow at the Horseshoe.”

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