Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

Join Mailing List

Music Canada

Gold/Platinum

 Music Canada

Industry News (285)

view

IFPI releases ‘Music Listening 2019’ report, providing a comprehensive look at rising music engagement in Canada and around the globe

Today, IFPI, the organization representing recorded music worldwide, released Music Listening 2019, a comprehensive overview of music consumption trends from around the world. The report examines the ways in which music consumers aged 16 – 64 engage with recorded music across 21 countries. 

The report illustrates the growth of music listening around the world. Globally, music listening is up, with respondents typically spending 18 hours per week listening to music, up from 17.8 hours in 2018. This equates to approximately 2.6 hours per day, the equivalent of listening to 52 three-minute songs per day. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

This global surge in music listening is driven by fans’ love of music – more than 54% of respondents say they “love” or are “fanatical” about music. Canadians are among the world leaders in terms of passion for music – 59% of Canadians say they are music lovers or music fanatics, which is above the global average and the fourth-highest in the world. 

“This year’s report tells an exciting story of how fans are increasingly engaging with music,” said Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI. “At a time when multiple forms of media vie for fans’ attention, they are not only choosing to spend more of their time listening to – and engaging with – music but they are doing so in increasingly diverse ways.” 

The report presents a profile of music lovers, who listen to more music per week, and to listen on a greater variety of services and platforms. 

Consumers’ embrace of music streaming services is growing across all demographics, with the highest rate of growth for the use of streaming services coming from the 35 – 64 age group. 54% of that demographic reported using a music streaming service in the past month, an increase of 8% from 2018. 

Overall, 89% of respondents listen to music using an on-demand streaming service. The biggest reasons consumers enjoy these services include access to large catalogues of music, and the convenience of listening. 

Source: IFPI Music Listening 2019

The report also shows that copyright infringement remains a threat to the music ecosystem. 27% of respondents used copyright infringement as a way to listen to or obtain music in the past month. The most prevalent form of music piracy is illegal stream ripping services, which were used to access music by 23% of respondents. 

“The report also highlights that the availability of music through unlicensed methods, or copyright infringement, remains a real threat to the music ecosystem,” continued Moore. “Practices such as stream ripping are still prevalent and return nothing to those who create and invest in music. We continue to coordinate world-wide action to address this.”

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The report also illustrates the scale of music listening via video services. Globally, 47% of on-demand streaming consumption is via video streaming, ahead of paid audio streaming (37%) and free audio streaming (15%). 77% of respondents said they used YouTube for music in the past month. 

This trend is concerning, as user-upload services like YouTube pay significantly lower royalty rates compared with other music streaming services.  This has a significant impact on artists’ and other rights holders’ incomes: plays on Spotify or Apple Music put dramatically more money in their pockets than the same number of plays on YouTube. The average annual revenue to rights holders per user is estimated by IFPI at under US$1 on YouTube, while on Spotify the comparative figure is US$20. 

Source: Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, Music Canada, 2019

The biggest cause of this discrepancy in royalty rates are provisions in Canada’s Copyright Act known as “safe harbours” that ad-supported user-upload services like YouTube claim as shelter from liability of responsibility for illegal activity. As examined in our recent report, Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours and Save the Creative Middle Class, the prevalence of services such as YouTube depresses not only consumer demand for paid subscription services (that better compensate artists and other rights holders by orders of magnitude) but also royalties paid by those services. These effects are the result of substitution possibilities, such as when a service like YouTube, which profits enormously through the subsidy enabled by overly broad safe harbours, provides a free alternative to paid services.

This is why Music Canada supports the recommendations of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage’s ground-breaking Shifting Paradigms report, which recommends to the government a series of actions that would help artists and the creative industries. The report tackles numerous weaknesses in Canada’s Copyright Act, identifying elements which have failed to keep pace with technology and the digital marketplace for music. Among its key recommendations which will bolster a functioning marketplace for creative works, the report recommends addressing Canada’s broad safe harbour laws, eliminating or narrowing exemptions from the Act that prevent creators from being fairly compensated, combating modern forms of piracy (like stream ripping) and strengthening the enforcement of Canada’s copyright laws.

Comments
view

Haviah Mighty wins 2019 Polaris Music Prize

Community Development Program participants applaud her performance and album

On September 16, Haviah Mighty won the 2019 Polaris Music Prize for her album, 13th Floor. The Prize recognizes the best Canadian album of the year based on artistic merit without regard to genre, sales history or label affiliation, as determined by the Polaris Grand Jury. 

“For me the 13th Floor is something that we remove from our reality because it is something that we don’t understand and therefore we dismiss it,” said Mighty in a Polaris release. “This is very parallel to so many of the experiences that I speak on, on this album. I’m in a room with so many different people from so many different walks of life who have acknowledged that this is something they feel is important. These people don’t necessarily share the narratives that I do or the walks of life that I have, and yet, here we are, finally on what I believe is the 13th Floor. This is the moment of resurgence where the dismissal that has existed is now being removed, and the discussion is being had. I’m so grateful that the people around me push me to be brave enough to speak my truth and to have it be acknowledged in this way.”

The Prize was awarded at the Polaris Prize Gala, held at the historic Carlu in Toronto, which featured performances by nine of the 10 Polaris Short List nominees. The Gala featured performances by Marie Davidson, Elisapie, FET.NAT, Dominique Fils-Aimé, Les Louanges, Haviah Mighty, PUP, Shad and Snotty Nose Rez Kids. Short-lister Jessie Reyez was also in attendance. 

Among the audience attendees were 40 engaged music creators, entrepreneurs and change makers, who took part in the Polaris Community Development Program (CDP), presented by Music Canada. Launched in 2018, the program partners with Canadian not-for-profit music organizations each year to improve equity and representation in the Canadian music industry to support and develop the music community. 

Participating organizations in the 2019 Community Development Program included: 

POLARIS MUSIC PRIZE GALA 2019
Carlu, Toronto. September 16, 2019
Photo by Dustin Rabin

  • Honey Jam
  • The Indigenous Music Alliance
  • The Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance
  • Lula World
  • Manifesto
  • Native Women in the Arts
  • The Remix Project
  • SoundCheck Youth
  • U for Change
  • Urban Arts

Two of the participating organizations had alumni represented on the Polaris Prize Short List.

Jessie Reyez joined The Remix Project program in 2014, and was a graduate of Round 11.0 of the program. 

“I always feel honoured every time I talk about the Remix Project because it’s done so much for me,” said Reyez in 2018, shortly after being nominated for four JUNO Awards. “The program and that formula works — if you go in there and you do what you’re supposed to do and you don’t waste the opportunity.”

Haviah Mighty participated in the Honey Jam showcase in 2011, 2012, and 2015. 

“For those who think they can wing a performance, I learned from Elaine that there is so much more that goes into being a strong performer,” said Mighty in a recent Toronto Star article. “(Professional musicians) understand exactly what they want to look like onstage. Nothing is a whim. My live performance is what garnered the interest of my team, my booking agent, my management.”

Prior to the Gala, participants took part in a brief information session, creating an opportunity for participants to connect with Music Canada and Polaris staff, media, and other community members in a welcoming environment. 

A selection of social media reaction from participants is included below:

Honoured to be included with all of the Polaris Community Partners including Lula World, The Remix Project, SoundCheck…

Posted by Honey Jam Canada on Wednesday, September 18, 2019

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2jl0h4heYC/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2he9vNnG0h/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2hTo1HHxZ2/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

 

Comments
view

The political power of music headlines the 2019 Global Forum at Canadian Music Week

Across genres, continents, and generations, artists have harnessed the unique power of music to rally imaginations and propel ideas into action. This year’s Global Forum explored that theme and examined the role that music plays in political movements.  The Soundtrack to Democracy: Music’s Political and Social Power brought the Canadian Music Week attendees both historical and contemporary examples of the power of music.

The event was kicked off by Miranda Mulholland explaining her own advocacy journey that has included her becoming one the world’s strongest advocates for creator’s rights. Mulholland, a musician, label owner and festival founder, discussed the moment she realized that she needed to add speaking up to her long list of duties. “Creators of music, literature, and visual arts have always been at the forefront of every revolution in which people fought to make our lives better. Music has provided the soundtrack for human rights movements around the world…When speaking to governments and policy makers, I tell them: We, musicians, have been there for you. Now we need your help.” 

Watch Mulholland’s full remarks below:

 

Mulholland then introduced The Soundtrack to Democracy’s keynote speaker: musician, author and political activist Dave Randall. His book Sound System: the political power of music looks at examples from Beethoven to Beyoncé to the UK grime scene, and charts his journey to understand what makes music so powerful.  Randall’s book can be purchased from Pluto Press.  

Armed with a guitar and an extensive knowledge of the historical significance of music, Randall’s keynote was a musical journey through time. 

Watch Randall’s full keynote below:

Following Randall’s keynote he joined two leading musicians from Canada who have used art to drive change – Lorraine Segato of The Parachute Club and ShoShona Kish of Digging Roots – for a panel discussion. Titled Rise Up: Using creativity to make change (a reference to The Parachute Club’s anthem for equality and shared power), the panel explored effective strategies artists have used to create and inspire change on issues close to their hearts.

Watch the full panel discussion moderated by Miranda Mulholland below:

Guests were then treated to a performance by members of the fast-rising rap group The Sorority, who in between songs encouraged those in town for Canadian Music Week to get out to see live music, support local musicians, and attend at least one show that put them out of their comfort zone. The Sorority are a powerful representation of solidarity and nonconformity, and their performance was the perfect punctuation to the event’s theme. 

To conclude the event, Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson introduced the audience to a painting from 1830,  “Liberty Leading the People,” by Eugène Delacroix to illustrate the effect to which art can be political speech. Henderson noted that in its time the painting “was considered so seditious and so dangerous that for about 50 years after it had been painted it was suppressed by the political superstructure and only appeared much later.” He connected the painting to the work of Ursula K Le Guin, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and journalist Paul Foot, tracing the ways that poets, artists and more recently musicians, can change the world.

Watch Henderson’s closing remarks below:

Recognizing the power of art to convey thoughts and emotions, Music Canada commissioned illustrator and graphic artist Rodrigo Bravo to chronicle the 2019 Global Forum in a series of images. The images, available for viewing below, capture some of the points made by each speaker in both text and design, and together form a recap of one of the most successful Global Forums to date. 

Comments
view

Graham Henderson releases Music Canada’s Closing the Value Gap report at the Economic Club of Canada

On June 26, in front of a sold out audience at the Economic Club of Canada, Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson delivered a keynote address to launch our latest report Closing the Value Gap: How to Fix Safe Harbours & Save the Creative Middle Class.

Henderson’s message was clear – the creative middle class is being eliminated by outdated copyright laws. His speech can be viewed on the Economic Club’s Facebook page, and is embedded below.

In his speech, Henderson shared some of the startling new economic evidence in the report which details the scope of harm done, and confirms that the Value Gap in Canada continues to grow.  

In a series of studies, Dr. George Barker, Visiting Fellow, London School of Economics, and Honorary Associate Professor, Australian National University, has documented that the Value Gap in Canada is significantly larger than previously understood, and that it continues to widen.

Dr. Barker distilled his findings to three key measures:

  • $19.3 billion – the cumulative Canadian recorded music Value Gap over 20 years since 1997
  • $1.6 billion – the music industry Value Gap in Canada in 2017 alone
  • $82 million – the average annual increase in the music industry Value Gap in Canada between 1997 and 2017

After his speech, Henderson was joined on stage by the MP for Toronto-Danforth and Chair of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage Julie Dabrusin. As Chair of the Committee, Dabrusin recently released a report, Shifting Paradigms, that recommended to the government a series of actions that would help artists and the creative industries.  Henderson called the report, “a guide to fix the Internet.”

Dabrusin credited artists testimony at the Heritage Committee for the report’s recommendations, and cited Miranda Mulholland’s personal account of how Value Gap has affected her career as a catalyst for her careful consideration of these issues. 

“I think we should give a bit of a shout out to Miranda Mulholland,” said Dabrusin. “… She spoke very, very forcefully about the value gap and where it was most forceful was that it brought up her personal journey, the stories of other artists who she knew. So it wasn’t just a dry, matter of fact on a piece of paper anymore. It was hearing the actual impact that was happening in our communities and young people’s lives. And that was the first time that perhaps I’d even twigged a bit more carefully to those issues.”

Dabrusin also encouraged everyone in the music industry to continue to work together when dealing with the Federal government noting that for the Copyright Act Review, almost all music stakeholders came forward with the music priorities to address the Value Gap. 

Following the event, Henderson has spoken about the urgent need to close the Value Gap in a number of media appearances, including BNN Bloomberg, CP24, the Toronto Sun, and the Wire Report.

Comments
view

Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing launch National Artist Entrepreneur Survey

Music Canada and CONNECT Music Licensing invite artists to share their insights and experiences in a new national survey that focuses on artists’ business needs in an ever-changing music economy.

The two Canadian music organizations have partnered to conduct research in response to changing trends in the music ecosystem in which artists increasingly operate as business owners, often referred to as “artist-preneurs.” The project kicked off earlier this spring with an environmental scan conducted through a series of focus groups with artists and industry leaders.

Survey findings will be used to guide the design and delivery of a pilot artist entrepreneur program later this year.

Canadian artist entrepreneurs at any stage of their career are invited to complete this short survey which is available in both official languages, until June 21, 2019. Participants will be able to opt in for a chance to win a Long & McQuade gift card valued at $25.

Click here to complete the survey

For any inquiries, please contact Sarah Hashem, VP Strategic Initiatives at Music Canada, at shashem@musiccanada.com.

*******

Music Canada et CONNECT Music Licensing lancent une étude de marché nationale pour les artistes entrepreneurs

Music Canada et CONNECT Music Licensing invitent les artistes à partager leurs points de vue et leurs expériences dans le cadre d’un nouveau sondage national axé sur les besoins commerciaux des artistes dans une économie musicale en évolution constante.

Les deux organisations musicales canadiennes se sont associées pour mener des recherches en réponse aux tendances changeantes de l’écosystème musical dans lequel les artistes fonctionnent de plus en plus en tant que propriétaires d’entreprises. Le projet a démarré plus tôt ce printemps avec une analyse de l’environnement réalisée grâce à la tenue d’une série de groupes de discussion avec des artistes et des leaders de l’industrie.

Les résultats du sondage serviront à orienter la conception et la réalisation d’un programme pilote d’artistes entrepreneurs plus tard cette année.

Où qu’ils en soient dans leur carrière, les artistes canadiens sont invités à remplir ce court sondage qui sera disponible dans les deux langues officielles jusqu’au 21 juin 2019. Les participants pourront s’inscrire pour courir la chance de gagner une carte-cadeau Long & McQuade d’une valeur de 25 $.

Remplir le sondage

Pour toute question, veuillez contacter Sarah Hashem, vice-présidente, Initiatives stratégiques, à Music Canada, au shashem@musiccanada.com

Comments
view

New IFPI website highlights the leading role record companies play in investing in and supporting artists

IFPI has launched a new website titled Powering the Music Ecosystem designed to showcase the role record labels play in today’s global music landscape as a leading investor in music, and partner and collaborator with artists.

Some of the key statistics referenced are the 33.8% of record company revenues that are invested back into music annually, and the USD $5.8 billion investment that record companies make into A&R and marketing annually.

The site emphasizes the flexibility artists have in collaborating with record companies within new partnership models, and charts one example of the various label teams that artists can work with to advance their career, such as A&R, creative, marketing & digital, sync & partnership, global distribution, and press & publicity.

The site also features several case studies on breakthrough artists like Camila Cabello, J Balvin, and Aya Nakamura, focused on how those artists collaborated with label teams to leverage their creativity and success on a global scale.

For more information, visit the full website and check out the infographic below.

 

Comments
view

Win a Scott Helman prize pack to celebrate his latest #GoldinCanada certifications!

Photo Credit: Warner Music Canada

Were you one of the lucky fans in attendance at Scott Helman‘s recent Toronto show when he was surprised with a Gold plaque for “Hang Ups” on stage at the Danforth Music Hall? Since then, Scott’s received his second #GoldinCanada certification of 2019 for “Kinda Complicated,” joining “PDA” as the second track from 2017 album Hôtel de Ville to reach Gold status!

To celebrate, we’ve teamed with Warner Music Canada to give one lucky fan a shot at winning a sweet Scott Helman vinyl prize pack featuring two vinyl records (Hôtel de Ville Augusta EP) and more Hôtel de Ville swag (CD, t-shirt, sticker set)!

HOW TO WIN

Simply head over to Gold/Platinum Canada’s Instagram, find our contest post, and:

  1. Follow Gold/Platinum Canada on Instagram.
  2. Like the contest post.
  3. Comment with your favourite Scott Helman song certified #GoldinCanada (make sure to use the hashtag!).
  4. Tag a friend you’ve listened to it with.

That’s it! All entrants must be following Gold/Platinum Canada on Instagram, so if you’re not already, don’t forget to do that once you’ve entered.

By entering the contest, you agree to the Official Contest Rules.

Contest closes at 11:59PM EST on Monday, May 20, 2019.

Comments
view

IFPI’s Global Music Report 2019 illustrates streaming’s continued rise in Canada and around the globe

IFPI’s anticipated annual State of the Industry” report is now available and paints a picture of an industry transformed by evolving listening trends and emerging markets. Overall, the global music industry experienced its fourth year of consecutive growth, with an increase of 9.7% in 2018. Much of that growth across the globe is attributed to streaming, which increased by 34% and accounted for almost half of global revenue at 47%.

Streaming accounted for 60% of recorded music revenues in Canada in 2018, and increased in trade value by 31.9% from USD $200.7 million in 2017 to USD $264.8 million in 2018. Of that streaming revenue, USD $211.8 million came from subscription audio streams, USD $26.78 million came from ad-supported audio streams, and USD $26.21 million came from video streams. After streaming, the next leading sources of recorded music revenues are “other digital” at 15%, physical sales at 15% and performance rights and synch at 11%.

The reports also list five key elements to fostering fair marketplaces so music continues to thrive. Those elements are:

  • Music’s value must be recognized;
  • Copyright frameworks must be clear and provide legal certainty;
  • Rights holders must be free to decide who can use their music and how;
  • Music must be licensed on fair terms, and;
  • Adequate tools must be available to prevent music from being made available illegally.

Securing sustainable growth for today’s digital music industry will be the topic of focus this Friday in Geneva, as Music Canada and IFPI present ‘An Industry Transformed’ during the convening of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

The top digital single of 2018 in Canada was “God’s Plan” by Drake, who was awarded IFPI’s 2018 Global Artist of the Year Award in February of 2019, becoming the only artist to ever win the award twice. The top digital single worldwide in 2018 was “Havana” by Camila Cabello (feat. Young Thug) with “God’s Plan” in the number two position. The top album of 2018 in Canada was Drake’s Scorpion, and globally was The Greatest Showman (OST) by Cast of ‘The Greatest Showman.’

IFPI’s Global Music Report 2019: State of the Industry is available for download on IFPI’s website.

 

Comments
view

Release: Music Canada Announces New Executive Team Appointments

Restructuring, in concert with other recent initiatives, positions Music Canada to deliver on its new three-year strategic plan

Jackie Dean, newly-appointed Chief Operating Officer, Music Canada

Toronto, March 28, 2019:  Music Canada today announced the appointment of Jackie Dean to the newly created position of Chief Operating Officer and the promotion of two other senior team members to the organization’s executive team.

The appointments, in concert with recently announced changes to Music Canada’s Board of Directors and the creation of an Advisory Council, position the association to deliver on its new three-year strategic plan. Objectives set out in the plan include contributing to the enhancement of Canada’s music ecosystem; ensuring Music Canada is a great place to work for its talented and engaged team; and returning demonstrable value to its members while advancing their interests.

These actions are the product of a comprehensive governance review which, in addition to the new Advisory Council, has resulted in changes to Music Canada’s bylaws; the implementation of a diversity policy; and the addition of two new independent member positions to the Board of Directors, with the representation of women on the Board increased to 40 percent.

“The new appointments represent another important step in implementing the conclusions of our 2018 governance review,” says Graham Henderson, President and CEO, Music Canada. “They demonstrate our commitment to promoting equity, diversity and inclusion, and to meeting our goals for accountability and transparency. The result is a streamlined organizational structure that positions us to achieve the objectives set by our Board.”

Henderson added, “The changes will also help Music Canada to achieve our goal of enhancing Canada’s music ecosystem in concert with our partners in the music community.”

In her new role, Dean, along with other members of the leadership team, will support Henderson in executing the organization’s strategic plan and driving its research, advocacy and community leadership activities.  

Dean joined Music Canada in June 2002 as Chief Financial Officer on a part-time basis, and will now be full-time in her new role. During this same period of time, she also served as COO of The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences/The JUNO Awards & MusiCounts, helping to build the four pillars of the organization’s mandate to Educate, Develop, Celebrate and Honour Canadian artists.

In addition to Dean’s appointment, Patrick Rogers has been promoted to Vice President, Corporate Affairs. Rogers joined Music Canada in May 2016 as Director, Regulatory Affairs, and in his new role, will lead Music Canada’s public policy and communications teams. Sarah Hashem has been appointed Vice President, Strategic Initiatives. Hashem joined Music Canada in June 2018 as Managing Director of the association’s Three Rs Music Program, and will now lead initiatives focusing on specific areas of the music community ecosystem including artist entrepreneur programs and Music City strategies.

“Music Canada has the right leadership, a strong team and an effective organizational structure to achieve the goals we have set for the next three years,” says Jennifer Sloan, Chair of Music Canada’s Board of Directors. “I am confident that their efforts will advance the interests of our members and the broader music community in Canada.”

Allan Reid, President and CEO, CARAS, The JUNO Awards and MusiCounts, remarked, “I thank Jackie for her tremendous contributions to our organization. CARAS, the JUNOS, MusiCounts and Canada’s music community have all benefited from Jackie’s leadership for more than 16 years. I look forward to working with her and strengthening our partnership with Music Canada as she begins a new leadership role in our industry.”

– 30 –

For more information:
Corey Poole, Music Canada
cpoole@musiccanada.com
+1 (647) 808-7359

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada:  Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

Comments
view

Music March For Music Therapy returns to Toronto’s west end for 6th year

Music Canada is proud to return as a rockstar sponsor for the 6th annual Music March for Music Therapy in Toronto on Sunday, March 31, 2018, in support of the Canadian Music Therapy Trust Fund (CMTTF).

This year’s march will follow the same route as last year’s event, beginning at 11:30am at the Music Therapy Centre at 1175 Bloor St. W. At noon, participants will begin their march eastward on Bloor to Lee’s Palace (529 Bloor St. W) for some amazing entertainment, refreshments, and awesome raffle prizes.

The after-party at Lee’s Palace will feature performances by some incredible local acts including Matata 6, Rachel Romu, Havelin, Aviva, and Darrelle London, plus a special performance from Music Therapy Centre’s music therapists.

This year’s fundraising goal is $40,000, and you can help contribute by purchasing a ticket to the after-party or creating a fundraising page. In addition to the Music March, music therapy supporters can still purchase the CMTTF’s hats designed in collaboration with CDN. All proceeds from the sale of the hats will be donated to the CMTTF.

RSVP to the Music March for Music Therapy’s Facebook event to stay informed on the latest news and updates leading up to the exciting event. Watch highlights from last year’s march below.

Comments

This website made possible with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.