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Canadian Recording Industry an Important Wealth Generator and Employer: Report

Toronto, June 13, 2012: The Canadian Recording Industry makes a significant contribution to Canada’s economy with a vast majority of the activity taking place in Ontario, according to a new report by PwC for Music Canada.

The analysis examines the spending of major and independent music companies in Canada and estimates their impact on the GDP as $240 million in 2010 with a staggering 81% of the activity taking place in Ontario. This generates $37 million dollars in government revenues in Ontario alone.

“This is music to my ears,” said Michael Chan, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport. “Ontario is home to gifted professionals – from musicians, to producers to record labels that promote our province’s unique culture while generating highly skilled jobs that strengthen our economy. The McGuinty Government is proud to partner with our music sector, solidifying Ontario’s reputation as a competitive creative market and a national industry leader.”

Quebec is the next largest market, and with the Atlantic and Prairie regions, accounts for about 32% of the independent companies’ spending and 12% of the major companies’ spending.

Thousands of high paying jobs are supported by record companies in Canada with 3300 direct and indirect jobs across the country, and roughly 7400 more in the live performance sector.
“The recording industry in Canada is providing highly skilled, high-paying jobs today, even after a long period of contraction due to the effects of piracy,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “In Ontario alone, our study shows that large and small recording companies have created more than 2600 jobs and this doesn’t even include the broader music sector of artists, musicians, live performance and retail for instance. At an average wage of $60,100, those working for record companies in Ontario are making well above the average wage of industries across the province.”

The report was released today at the Annual General Meeting of Music Canada, the trade association representing the major music companies in Canada. The report was prepared by PwC. An executive summary, and full report with detailed industry analysis, quantitative regional analysis and source tables is available at www.musiccanada.com/research.aspx.

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For more information:

Amy Terrill – Vice President Public Affairs, Music Canada
aterrill@musiccanada.com 647-963-6044

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada, namely EMI Music Canada, Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also provides certain membership benefits to some of the leading independent record labels and distributors. Its members are engaged in all aspects of the recording industry, including the manufacture, production, promotion and distribution of music.

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Music Cluster Strategy Unveiled at NXNE by Music Canada

Toronto, June 14, 2012: Toronto is one of the greatest music cities in the world and yet it could be doing much more to maximize the economic benefits of the music cluster. That is the finding of a report commissioned by Music Canada and released today at NXNE Interactive (NXNEi).

Accelerating Toronto’s Music Industry Growth, Leveraging Best Practices from Austin, Texas was presented by Author Nikki Rowling and discussed by panelists City Councillor Josh Colle, live music venue operator and promoter Jeff Cohen, and Music Canada President Graham Henderson.

“The music cluster strategy is an important step forward to helping Toronto claim its rightful place as one of the best music cities in the world. With legendary live music venues, a vibrant recording industry, and celebrated festivals such as NXNE, Toronto’s music scene is second to none,” says City Councillor Josh Colle.

Music Canada, which represents the major multinational music companies in Canada, who employ hundreds of Torontonians in their Canadian headquarters, commissioned the study in order to identify how Toronto can compete with cities like Austin, Texas, which advertises itself as the “Live Music Capital of the World”.

“Toronto is one of the top two or three music cities in North America. The music community generates thousands of jobs and enormous economic spinoffs including tourism, and yet it is not recognized as an important commercial sector that warrants a strategy or promotion,” explains Graham Henderson. “Imagine what we could do with a plan like Austin’s, or in fact, with the type of recognition and promotion that has been extended to Toronto’s successful film and television sector.”

Accelerating Toronto’s Music Industry Growth demonstrates that in Austin, music is considered commerce, and the commercial music sector has been identified as a key component of the economy. In Toronto, according to the report, music is considered art and has been undervalued as an economic contributor. It outlines some of the challenges faced by recording studios and live music venues and advocates for a more business-friendly environment.

“Toronto has one of the highest ratios of live music venues to population in North America,” says Jeff Cohen of Collective Concerts. “This privately created asset can be leveraged in order to increase tourism and other economic spinoffs, but it first must be recognized as an important sector of the community. This should begin at City Hall with the creation of a licensing category for live music venues, rather than lumping them in with pool halls, restaurants or dance clubs, and the establishment of a single point of contact for live music similar to the Film and Television office. ”

Recommendations include:
1. Create a Music Industry Board to provide industry input through the Economic Development Committee;
2. Create a Music Industry Office to provide coordination across the various city departments that deal with issues relating to live music events and venues;
3. Create a Provincial Ontario Music Office;
4. Expand the Provincial Music Production Tax Credit to mirror the successful film and television tax credits;
5. Proactively pursue music tourism programs included a multi-day international music festival.

Toronto’s music cluster was discussed by Toronto’s Economic Development Committee on February 21, 2012 at which time Music Canada presented early findings of this study. City staff has been directed to return to the committee with a report and recommendations.

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For more information:

Amy Terrill – Vice President Public Affairs, Music Canada
aterrill@musiccanada.com 647-963-6044

About Music Canada
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada, namely EMI Music Canada, Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also provides certain membership benefits to some of the leading independent record labels and distributors. Its members are engaged in all aspects of the recording industry, including the manufacture, production, promotion and distribution of music.

About NXNE

Now in its 18th year, North by Northeast Festivals and Conference (NXNE) has become the Canadian festival destination for emerging artists and major-label headliners, for music filmmakers, and for digital interactive innovators bridging the gap between technology and the arts. Seen as the most anticipated summer music event in Canada, NXNE Music, NXNE Film, and NXNE Interactive are an essential gathering for artists, industry, and fans.

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Music Canada Supports Referral of C-11 to Committee

Toronto, February 8, 2012: Music Canada is pleased to see 2nd reading on Bill C-11, The Copyright Modernization Act, drawing to a close so that the Bill can proceed to a Legislative Committee for review.

“Copyright reform has been discussed for well over a decade in Canada, with draft legislation put forward by not one, but two governments. The discussion has featured mammoth and unprecedented public consultations, town halls, round tables, submissions and testimony by hundreds of witnesses, many representing thousands of Canadians. And in this Parliamentary session we have heard from dozens of speakers. All this while jobs are lost and careers are damaged, some beyond repair. It is time to deal with this issue in committee where the important work will take place to refine the Bill in order to ensure it meets the government’s objectives of protecting creative industries, combating piracy and encouraging productivity and innovation in Canada’s vital creative sector,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “We look forward to a post enactment world, when the creative community can focus on rebuilding the marketplace, and when it will become clear that reports of the impending death of the internet were greatly exaggerated.”

Music Canada, formerly known as the Canadian Recording Industry Association, appeared before the legislative committee reviewing Bill C-32 along with artists Loreena McKennitt and Maia Davies and representatives of the Canadian Independent Music Association and the Canadian Council of Music Industry Associations.

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Music Canada Proud to Support 41st Annual JUNO Awards

Toronto, February 7, 2012: Music Canada is proud to return as sponsor of the Album of the Year Award at the 41st Annual JUNO Awards.

“Canadian bands and artists firmly took hold of the world music stage in 2011, demonstrating the depth and diversity of Canadian talent,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “This came as no surprise to those of us who work alongside amazing artists like those nominated for this year’s Album of the Year Award, but firmly reinforces that Canada’s scene is worth promoting and protecting as one of its more fertile industries and an enormous part of Brand Canada.”

The Album of the Year Award will be presented at the 2012 JUNO Awards broadcast at Scotiabank Place in Ottawa on Sunday, April 1st.

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For more information:

Amy Terrill – Vice President Public Affairs, Music Canada
aterrill@musiccanada.com 647-963-6044

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record labels in Canada, namely EMI Music Canada, Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also provides certain membership benefits to some of the leading independent record labels and distributors. Its members are engaged in all aspects of the recording industry, including the manufacture, production, promotion and distribution of music.

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Toronto Digital Music Company Mediazoic Announces Licensing Deal with AVLA

Toronto Digital Music Company Mediazoic Announces Licensing Deal with AVLA
Comprehensive deal covers internet streaming of music from Universal, Warner, Sony, EMI, and more than 1000 independent labels

Toronto, January 24, 2012: Toronto-based digital music company Mediazoic today announced a deal with the AVLA (Audio-Video Licensing Agency), which will allow Mediazoic’s internet radio network to carry the music catalogues of more than 1000 record companies representing the majority of all sound recordings and music videos produced and/or distributed in Canada.

Based out of a radio and record production studio in downtown Toronto, Mediazoic makes software that allows both individuals and commercial organizations to create, customize and curate their own internet radio stations. The system keeps track of all “listens” throughout the network, allowing royalties to be paid not only to the creators and rights holders of the music, but also to other stakeholders in the music ecosystem.

Current station hosts on the Canadian-owned-and-operated internet radio network include renowned deejay Alan Cross, iconic Toronto live music venue Hugh’s Room, annual music festival Indie Week, and local hip hop MC and artist MC FÜBB.

Cross, whose Weekly Top 11 show is unveiled every Friday on the network, has high praise for what Mediazoic’s unique take on internet radio has done for him. “Mediazoic’s resources have been a big help to my website, driving both traffic and time spent.” he enthuses, “Everyone should give the company a look.”

The network also has several radio shows in development, which will benefit from the wide range of music that this deal opens for Mediazoic and its listeners. One such show is hosted by established music journalist Karen Bliss, who will be resurrecting her popular interview show Lowdown, a one-hour comprehensive “this is your life” type show. Lowdown, Bliss’s music industry brand, has appeared in all kind of incarnations: a Canadian music industry column, an online radio show, a TV segment on Inside Jam, a TV show on Bite TV, and a music seminar. Through these formats, she has covered hundreds of artists, including Avril Lavigne, Billy Talent, Nelly Furtado and Sum 41.

“Our listeners know that every one of our stations has been playing great music since our launch last year.” says Mediazoic founder Greg Nisbet, “but let’s face it, now that our station hosts can throw a bit of Joni Mitchell, K’naan or Leonard Cohen into the mix, the listener experience is going to get a whole lot better. Our aim has always been to capture some of the magic that happens between people when great music is created and heard, and spread that magic across the digital realm, so we’re really excited about all of the wonderful collaborations that this deal will allow us to explore.”

“We’re pleased to work with Mediazoic, which will ensure that all of our members, whether they represent emerging or established artists, benefit equally from “plays” on this innovative new network,” says Graham Henderson, President of AVLA and Music Canada.

The deal between Mediazoic and AVLA covers reproduction rights. Mediazoic is also working with Re:Sound, the Canadian not-for-profit music licensing company that licenses recorded music for public performance, broadcast and new media to cover performance rights. “We’re always happy to work with innovative companies like Mediazoic to ensure that music creators are fairly compensated within emerging business models.” said Ian MacKay, Re:Sound’s President.

About Mediazoic
Mediazoic is a next-generation music and media organization, based in Toronto, whose mission is to bring together like-minded people, both digitally and physically, with outstanding, highly curated content. Mediazoic’s growing network of operations includes Internet radio stations, live events, content development and licensing, and infrastructure for artist publicity and promotion. www.mediazoic.com

About AVLA
The AVLA Audio-Video Licensing Agency (AVLA) represents nearly 1000 major and independent record companies and other copyright owners, including many independent artists. Our members own or control the copyright in the vast majority of all sound recordings produced and distributed in Canada. We license the broadcasting and reproduction of our members’ audio and video recordings in Canada. www.avla.ca

About Re:Sound
Re:Sound Music Licensing Company is the Canadian not-for-profit music licensing company dedicated to obtaining fair compensation for artists and record companies for their performance rights. On behalf of its members, representing thousands of artists and record companies, Re:Sound licenses recorded music for public performance, broadcast and new media. All of the
money collected by Re:Sound is distributed to our members, less only our actual costs. Created in 1997 (as NRCC), our member organisations are ACTRA RACS, ARTISTI, MROC, AVLA and SOPROQ. For more information, please visit us at www.resound.ca.

Contact Info:

Greg Nisbet, Mediazoic
647-294-0153
gregn@mediazoic.com

Amy Terrill, AVLA
(416) 922-8727
aterrill@avla.ca

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CBC and AVLA announce historic music licensing deal

CBC AND AVLA ANNOUNCE HISTORIC MUSIC LICENSING DEAL
CBC prepares innovative digital music service for launch

January 24, 2012 – CBC and the Audio-Video Licensing Agency (AVLA) are pleased to announce that a groundbreaking music licensing deal has been reached. This historic deal will allow CBC to offer Canadians more of its radio programs on-line, on demand, as well as launch a new Canadian digital music service this winter.

This entrepreneurial breakthrough required nimble and imaginative business thinking on the part of both CBC and AVLA (which was negotiating on behalf of its entire membership of almost 1000 major and independent music companies). The deal is the first negotiated collective license in Canada for on-line streaming and podcasting of radio and on-line digital music programming.

“We are thrilled to have been able to work together with CBC to license a service that will be extremely welcome in Canada, where there are only a handful of digital options for consumers. This groundbreaking agreement means that music fans will have more access to the best in Canadian music, whether by emerging or established artists, while creators will enjoy full recognition for the value of their work,” says Graham Henderson, President of AVLA and Music Canada.

“As Canada’s national public broadcaster, we must provide opportunities for Canadians to enjoy our on-air radio programs anywhere they wish but also to offer original new ways to connect Canadians with music where, when and how they want it” says Chris Boyce, executive director of radio and audio of CBC English Services.

“Through this new relationship with AVLA and the Canadian music labels, CBC will be able to offer its programs on-demand complete with music while at the same time building a new digital music service, that will be unlike any other available today in Canada”, says Boyce. “As part of our on-going commitment to Canadian culture, this will be accomplished by combining the power of context, curation and community in new and innovative ways,” adds Boyce.

More details about CBC’s unique digital music service will be announced in the coming weeks.

About CBC/Radio-Canada
CBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster and one of its largest cultural institutions. The Corporation is a leader in reaching Canadians on new platforms and delivers a comprehensive range of radio, television, Internet, and satellite-based services. Deeply rooted in the regions, CBC/Radio-Canada is the only domestic broadcaster to offer diverse regional and cultural perspectives in English, French and eight Aboriginal languages, plus seven languages for international audiences. In 2011, CBC/Radio-Canada celebrated 75 years of serving Canadians and being at the centre of the democratic, social and cultural life of Canada.

About AVLA
The AVLA Audio-Video Licensing Agency (AVLA) represents nearly 1000 major and independent record companies and other copyright owners, including many independent artists. Our members own or control the copyright in the vast majority of all sound recordings produced and distributed in Canada. We license the broadcasting and reproduction of our members’ audio and video recordings in Canada. www.avla.ca

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For further information, contact:
Nell Crichton, Veritas Communications
(416) 482-0864
Crichton@veritascanada.com

Amy Terrill, AVLA
(416) 922-8727
aterrill@avla.ca

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“Songs For Japan” Hits $10 Million Milestone

Today, the IFPI announced that the Songs For Japan, the 38-song compilation album created to help raise money for victims of Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami disasters, has raised over $10 Million and continues to benefit the survivors through Japanese Red Cross Society.

As per the release, senior executives from four major music companies – EMI, Sony Music, Universal Music and Warner Music Group – met yesterday in Tokyo with Yoshiharu Otsuk, Vice President of the Japanese Red Cross Society, to recognize the milestone of $10 million raised and donated from the global sales of Songs For Japan. The occasion was a reception hosted by IFPI chief executive Frances Moore.

In the release, Tadateru Konoe, President of Japanese Red Cross Society, said, “The kind thoughts of the people who made and bought this album have given great encouragement to the people affected by the earthquake and tsunami. One hundred percent of the money raised goes directly to those most in need. On behalf of the Japanese Red Cross and the people affected by the disaster, I want to sincerely thank the artists and music companies for this generous support. It is much needed and greatly appreciated.”

Songs for Japan is a music industry-wide initiative, with all the participating artists, songwriters, music labels, music publishers and iTunes waiving their royalties and proceeds to maximize the amount of money donated for survivors. Additionally, participating manufacturers, distributors and marketing partners donated materials, services and advertising time or space.

The result is an unprecedented compilation of 38 major hits and classic tracks, including 21 Billboard Hot 100 hits and five Number 1 hits from more than 30 of the biggest names in music. The collection was rush-released worldwide on March 25 – only 14 days after the earthquake struck Japan – as a digital album via iTunes, followed by the release of a physical two-CD set.

Worldwide, music fans have purchased more than 1 Million digital and physical copies of Songs for Japan since it’s release. The album reached #1 on iTunes in 18 countries worldwide the week after release.

To purchase the album and help with the continuing relief efforts, download the album for just $9.99 on iTunes.

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Music Canada Welcomes Copyright Reform

Toronto, September 29, 2011: Music Canada is pleased to see long overdue copyright reform legislation back on the Parliamentary agenda and a strong commitment to get it passed.

“As we’ve witnessed in the past, the process is important and knowing that the government is committed to ensuring this bill advances into law, unlike its three predecessors, is gratifying,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “Like any bill, we are fully confident it will undergo changes in committee, particularly given the consensus that developed during review of Bill C-32 that slight adjustments were needed so that the legislation would meet the government’s anti-piracy objectives and support jobs in the creative industries.”

Music Canada, formerly known as the Canadian Recording Industry Association, appeared before the legislative committee reviewing Bill C-32 along with artists Loreena McKennitt and Maia Davies and representatives of the Canadian Independent Music Association and the Canadian Council of Music Industry Associations.

Bill C-32, The Copyright Modernization Act, became the third copyright reform bill to die on the Order Paper when a Federal Election was called in March 2011.

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First Canadian Commercial-free mobile streaming service launches with collective licensing agreement

Toronto, August 16, 2011: A collective licensing agreement, representing more than 1500 major and independent record labels in Canada, has facilitated the launch of Galaxie Mobile by Stingray Digital, the first Canadian-owned commercial-free mobile streaming music service.

The agreement with Stingray is Canada’s first collective semi-interactive agreement and was negotiated by AVLA and SOPROQ on behalf of their members who represent the majority of recorded music in Canada, laying the groundwork for future agreements of its kind.

Music Canada, which represents Canada’s major record labels, spearheaded the negotiations, empowering AVLA to act on its behalf. Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada, points out that the major labels want to see more digital services operating in Canada as quickly as possible,

“We aggressively pursued this pioneering agreement because we understand how cumbersome our regulatory environment can be, and we want to help services better navigate it. We hope the Stingray agreement sets the stage for other online and mobile services, and signals to the marketplace that Canada is open for business.”

“For digital music services who are eager to enter the Canadian market, it is an enormous benefit to be able to negotiate with one or two organizations rather than 1500 plus rights holders,” says Victoria Shepherd, Executive Director of AVLA.
Stingray release.FINAL.pdf

You can also find Galaxie’s official release on marketwire.

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Unison Benevolent Fund Pleased To Announce That Donations Continue To Roll In

Toronto, Ontario – August 10, 2011 – The Unison Benevolent Fund is proud to announce that donations continue to roll in and that the entire Canadian music industry is taking to this special cause with some unique and exciting fundraising ideas and opportunities. With an online fundraising platform (powered by Artez) now in place, Unison encourages members of the music industry to help drive donations to the $1 million mark – the threshold set for Unison to become operational.

Keeping in the true spirit of the Unison Benevolent Fund – that is has been created for the music industry, by the music industry, Shauna deCartier of Six Shooter Records has made a generous donation on her company’s behalf. Shauna comments: “The donation was made in lieu of Christmas gifts to our artists. We are very interested in building a community of artists, and so I can’t think of a more appropriate charity to support during the holiday season – or any other season, for that matter.”

Earlier this year, Manitoba Music also took up the cause, along with their event partner, Manitoba Film & Music with their Manitoba Music Rocks Charity Curling Bonspiel. Over 100 musicians and members of the local music industry came out to participate and support the cause. The Bonspiel generated tremendous goodwill and awareness for Unison – and Manitoba Music is eagerly anticipating their “Second Annual” this winter.

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