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Statement regarding the shutdown of isoHunt Web Technologies Inc.

Toronto, Oct 17, 2013: The closure of isoHunt’s worldwide operations announced today is a landmark victory for the creative community in Canada and around the globe. The members of Music Canada had united with other music companies in an amended pleading in the Canadian action against isoHunt Web Technologies Inc. and its owner Gary Fung. As one of the largest unauthorized BitTorrent sites in the world, isoHunt has been profiting from the work of creators by enabling millions of infringing acts and making a vast variety of unlicensed music, film and other creative content available for instant download. We welcome its closure.

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Music Canada deeply concerned regarding the uncertain future for the iconic sign from Sam the Record Man

The following is text from a letter sent to Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and the Chair of the Toronto and East York Community Council. On behalf of the members and partners of Music Canada, I wish to express our deep concern regarding the uncertain future for the iconic sign from Sam the Record Man.The sign, as the last remaining vestige of the Yonge Street store, holds significant historic and cultural value for Toronto. Sam’s was a destination for music lovers, musicians and artists from within Toronto and far beyond the city’s borders. It was a gathering place, a place for music discovery, and the original location of what would go on to become a symbolic Canadian retailer. Music is a key asset, economically, historically and culturally, for Toronto, and the Sam’s sign is a key component.

When the building was purchased, it was deemed important enough to warrant an agreement with Ryerson University for its restoration and reinstallation. Its value has not waned.

We encourage members of the Toronto City Council and the Economic Development Department to pursue a solution that will ensure the sign is properly restored, maintained and mounted so that it can be enjoyed by the public. The financial responsibility for these activities should be assumed by Ryerson University in accordance with the original agreement. If an alternate location must be found for the restored sign, the Toronto music community will be pleased to help identify an appropriate choice.

Sincerely,

Amy Terrill

Vice President Public Affairs,
Music Canada

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Report Identifies New Directions to Drive Growth and Job Creation in the Economy at Large and Canada’s Commercial Music Business in Particular

Report Identifies New Directions to Drive Growth and Job Creation in the Economy at Large and Canada’s Commercial Music Business in Particular

Music Education, Digital Innovation, Music Tourism, Export Expansion and Interconnected Tax Credits identified as critical areas for development

Toronto, March 21, 2013: Music Canada today tabled a new report identifying programs and public policies to stimulate the development of Canada’s commercial music sector. The Next Big Bang: A New Direction for Music in Canada proposes a renewed industrial strategy for music and pinpoints key recommendations in the following areas: music education, digital innovation, music tourism, export expansion and interconnected tax credits.

The report demonstrates that by addressing these areas, music can contribute more substantially to the broader economy. The commercial music industry employs thousands of people in a highly creative and dynamic field that has been reshaped by the digital revolution.

“The commercial music sector has the potential to support government efforts to improve economic performance and job growth at all levels. We want to get the message across that music can help in a multiplicity of ways,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “Music’s potential can be fully realized, and Canada can secure its place on the global cultural map, by updating current policies and programs from the analog era in which they were created.”

The Next Big Bang: A New Direction for Music in Canada is intended to stimulate a broader conversation about how best to strengthen Canada’s music business. The report was developed after months of research, interviews and expert submissions. Contributors include the Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC), Nordicity, digital expert Darlene Tonelli and Austin’s Titan Music Group.

The report’s recommendations are designed with the realities of today’s music industry in mind. Among these realities: (i) digital revenues have grown significantly but do not yet make up for the massive losses in physical sales; (ii) legitimate music services still must contend with unlicensed music sources that do not pay artists and music companies; (iii) in 2012, for the first time in over a decade, the global market for recorded music increased slightly over the previous year; (iv) music companies, despite the implosion of revenues, continue to invest in talent development; (v) music discovery has largely moved online; and, (vi) live performance constitutes an increasingly important part of an artist’s income.

The report contains 17 recommendations, including:

a) Given the strong evidence that music education prepares workers who are more creative, better problem-solvers, and possess soft skills that are critical in the digital economy, as well as the correlation between music scenes and tech clusters, governments should invest more in music education and should consider music scenes as a tool for economic development;

b) Music funding programs should reward innovation;

c) Efforts should be made to support the discovery of Canadian music online through partnerships with digital music services;

d) Cities and regions should develop a music tourism strategy in partnership with their local music community;

e) Canada should develop a national music export office to better assist music companies and artist entrepreneurs to expand their export markets;

f) A presence for the music industry should be established in Los Angeles to stimulate exports to the US market and attract more music recording activity to Canadian recording studios; and

g) Tax credits for music companies should be modernized and expanded, (replicating the best practices established in film and TV at the federal and provincial levels) resulting in jobs, economic activity and contributions to the tax base.

QUOTES:

“Ontario is home to a wealth of talent – from the artist to the industry. Our government is a proud partner of our music sector, working in concert with stakeholders like Music Canada to identify key priorities to further enhance the vitality and vibrancy of music in Ontario. Together, we are working in concert to develop a Live Music Strategy for Ontario that will firmly place our province on the map as a premier destination for live music on the international stage.”
Michael Chan, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport

“Music and technology are, in our view, inextricably linked. Tech jobs today require discipline and logical thinking, as well as creativity and an ability to innovate on the basis of strategic thinking. Music education, and lifelong involvement with music made possible in cities with strong scenes, could be Canada’s competitive advantage. Educators, parents, policy-makers and business leaders concerned with Canadian economic prosperity should consider the role music might play as a global competitive advantage.”
Jeff Leiper, Chief Policy Advisor, Information and Communications Technology Council

“Tax credits have been very effective as a creative industry stimulus. Properly enhanced, they could power even more growth in the music sector and its spin-offs in the economy at large. For instance, music could take a leaf from success in the film and TV business – and leverage foreign as well as domestic investment in Canada through tax credits.”
Peter Lyman, Senior Partner, Nordicity

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For more information:
Amy Terrill – Vice President Public Affairs, Music Canada
aterrill@musiccanada.com 647-963-6044

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record labels in Canada, namely Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also provides membership benefits to some of the leading independent record labels and distributors. Its members are engaged in all aspects of the recording industry, including the manufacture, production, promotion and distribution of music.

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National music organizations join voices to oppose cuts to TDSB music programs

The Coalition for Music Education, Music Canada and MusiCounts believe in the importance of music education for all young people in schools. We are joining our voices together to urge the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) to keep providing a comprehensive education that includes quality music instruction for all students, taught by individuals with a background and training in music. We strongly disagree with any reduction to music in schools and ask – what is the TDSB’s vision and plan to maintain quality music programs in TDSB schools for all students?Research has proven that music education provides far-reaching benefits to the lives of young Canadians, to our communities and to our culture. We believe that decisions minimizing any aspect of the TDSB’s music program will have a long-term negative impact on the lives of Toronto students and on the community.

Music is essential to education and to life.
Music education:

  • teaches students to think creatively and critically,
  • develops skills that are essential in the 21st century workforce,
  • opens students’ minds to diverse perspectives and thinking,
  • bridges languages, cultures and generations,
  • unites us through shared experiences,
  • enriches our sense of beauty and imagination, and
  • supports student success.

The Coalition for Music Education annually celebrates the importance of learning music in our schools
through a national event titled Music Monday. This year’s Showcase Concert in Toronto included a live
link with Commander Hadfield in the International Space Station, who said, “Everybody should be
learning music. Music opens doors. And music stimulates the brain. Music helps organize and even
wire your brain…Music education is really important in life. It’s a wonderful and applicable skill that
only makes you a more capable human – We should all learn music.”

Music Canada has identified music education as one of five critical components for the development of the music industry in Canada and points out that the recently announced Ontario Music Fund (OMF) sends a clear message from the government that it values the contributions of the music community and that it thinks music is a sound investment. “There is vast evidence that music education contributes to the broader development of young minds and more well-rounded citizens,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “Music is a great equalizer, bridging all cultures, and languages.”

MusiCounts is helping keep music alive in our schools. This year MusiCounts awarded over $1 million in grants and scholarships to schools and communities in Canada. MusiCounts’ mission is to ensure that children in Canada, regardless of socio-economic circumstances or cultural background, have access to a music program through their school. “Every child deserves the opportunity to experience and benefit from playing an instrument.” says Allan Reid, Director, MusiCounts. “Music can and does change lives.”

We urge decision-makers to maintain quality music programs in the TDSB.

About the Coalition for Music Education:
The Coalition for Music Education works to raise awareness and understanding of the role music education plays in Canadian Culture, and to promote the benefits music education brings to young people.
We envision Canada as a country where the lives of all children are enriched by quality school music programs, and where their active participation in music is valued and supported in our communities.

For more information about the Coalition, please visit MusicMakesUs.

For more information contact:
Holly Nimmons, Executive Director
(416) 371-6486 | holly@musicmakesus.ca

About Music Canada:
Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization founded in 1964 that promotes the interests of its members as well as their partners, the artists. Music Canada is a passionate advocate for music and those who create it. Music Canada also works closely with recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters and managers in the promotion and development of the music cluster.
For more information about Music Canada, please visit Music Canada

For more information, contact:
Amy Terrill, Vice-President, Public Affairs
(416) 967-7272 ext 103 | aterrill@musiccanada.com

About MusiCounts:
MusiCounts, Canada’s music education charity associated with The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS), is helping to keep music alive in schools across Canada. MusiCounts’ mission is to ensure that children in Canada, regardless of socio-economic circumstances or cultural
background, have access to a music program through their school. MusiCounts includes Band Aid musical instrument grants, the MusiCounts Teacher of the Year Award, Scholarships, and other music education initiatives.

For more information about MusiCounts, please visit MusiCounts

For more information, contact:
Allan Reid, Director
(416) 485-3135 ext 228 | allan@musicounts.ca

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Media Advisory: Toronto music campaign to be launched at NXNE

Toronto, June 11, 2013: A campaign to position Toronto as one of the greatest music cities in the world will be launched at NXNE just one year after the concept was first discussed at the event. A study comparing Toronto to Austin Texas was released at NXNE by Music Canada in 2012 recommending, among other things, an industry-led initiative to brand the city’s music scene.

That brand will be revealed on June 13 by a panel consisting of:

Graham Henderson, Music Canada
Josh Colle, Toronto City Councillor
Mike Tanner, NXNE
Jesse Kumagai, The Corporation of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall
Andrew Weir, Tourism Toronto

The Toronto music city campaign will activate artists, industry supporters, and fans of the Toronto music community in order to create more awareness about Toronto’s music scene, more opportunities for live music in Toronto and a more music-friendly City Hall.

When: Thursday, June 13 @ 4:15 pm
Where: NXNE Interactive, The Hyatt Regency, 370 King Street West, Room: Regency D

To arrange interviews, please contact Amy Terrill at aterrill@musiccanada.com or 416-967-7272 x 103.

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For more information:

Music Canada Media Contact: Amy Terrill 647-963-6044 aterrill@musiccanada.com 647-963-6044

NXNE Media Contact FLIP PUBLICITY Damien Nelson 416.533.7710 X221 damien@flip-publicity.com

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The Rambler by Graham Henderson: The Next Big Bang in Kitchener-Waterloo

Graham_headphones3Blog ThumbnailThe Rambler is a column by Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. Graham writes from time to time about developments in the music industry, new trends or just about music! Let’s face it, Graham has been around for a long time and has a lot to ramble on about.

Earlier this month I gave a presentation on The Next Big Bang to the ultra-organized music community in Kitchener-Waterloo. They seem to have ALL the right pieces in place and enormous drive and ambition.

You can visit the Music Works to see the great work the K-W community is doing to accelerate their local music cluster.

The Next Big Bang is Music Canada’s new report identifying programs and public policies to stimulate the development of Canada’s commercial music sector, available for download here.


My thanks to Silvia Di Donato, Manager of Arts and Culture at the City of Kitchener for the invitation to speak, and to Earl McCluskie, producer with Chestnut Hall Music for uploading the video.

Graham Henderson is the President of Music Canada. He also writes on an eclectic range of topics on his personal blog at www.grahamhenderson.ca.

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Ontario Music Fund an important investment in job creation in Ontario’s music industry

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Ontario Music Fund an important investment in job creation in Ontario’s music industry

Toronto, May 1, 2013: On behalf of our members and partners, Music Canada commends the Government of Ontario for its commitment to accelerate the growth of the music industry in the province with the creation of the Ontario Music Fund announced today.

“Music is a superpower that’s primed and ready to perform for Ontario. It’s a smart investment given the globally competitive advantage we have in the recorded and live music sectors,” says Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. “Research has shown that targeted support for music will pay off with enormous dividends including job growth, increased investment, tourism and the transformation of Ontario into one of the recording capitals of the world. As we in the music community like to say, music can help.”

The Ontario Music Fund is a $45 million dollar grant program to be distributed over three years beginning in 2013-14. According to a release by the Ministry of Finance, the fund is designed to support new digital and record production and distribution of Canadian music, to increase partnership opportunities and to promote Ontario’s music industry in Canada and around the world.

Ontario’s music industry is one of the most robust and diversified in North America. The recording sector alone generates more than $300 million in economic impact in Ontario which accounts for 81% of the total activity across Canada. It’s a cutting edge digital sector that predominantly attracts young workers. Live music is also of critical importance, both as a key aspect of Ontario’s competitive advantage, and as a source of income for artists and musicians.

The announcement was made today to a capacity crowd at Lee’s Palace in Toronto and with performances by Courage My Love from Kitchener and Royal Wood from Toronto.

QUOTES:

“On behalf of our 85 employees at Metalworks, I wish to congratulate the Government of Ontario for its commitment to maintaining a vibrant music industry. As a result of today’s announcement, the industry will get a much needed boost in the arm and the 220 students currently enrolled at Metalworks Institute of Sound and Music Production will be more likely to enjoy successful careers in an industry that I have been fortunate to call my own from the time I was a teenager. Today is a great day for music in Ontario.” Gil Moore, CEO, Metalworks Group

“The new Ontario Music Fund is a welcome investment in Ontario’s music industry and in our world class cast of talented artists and musicians. We look forward to learning more about the program and how we can work with the government to build on the entrepreneurial spirit in the music community.” Steve Jordan, founder and Executive Director, Polaris Music Prize

“Broader support for music production in Ontario will provide a strong incentive for Canadian artists to record in Ontario, while also helping us lure major American and international acts to record here. We congratulate the government for making a commitment towards the music industry in this province which is, by any measure, one of Ontario’s great assets.” Kim Cooke, Co-owner, Revolution Recording

“Returning to Toronto as NXNE’s new festival director, I’m inspired to see first-hand the extent of the Government of Ontario’s commitment to supporting the music industry in this province. I believe that we have the most passionate fans, the most visionary and experienced industry, and the most talented artists anywhere. This tremendous and timely support from our provincial government will be vital in helping our music sector rock the world. I couldn’t agree more – music creates jobs.” Christopher Roberts, NXNE Festival Director

“The Ontario Music Fund announced today creates a strong incentive for artists and their teams to produce more recordings in Ontario. In a competitive global environment, every edge makes a difference. Congratulations to the government for seeing the importance of the music industry.” Donny DaSilva, Manager, Noble Street Studios

“We applaud the Ontario government’s creation of the Ontario Music Fund, and their recognition that music not only plays a profound role in the cultural lives of Ontarians, but is also an important driver of the economy and a source of valued jobs. We hope this announcement will allow the already vibrant live music sector to amplify our successes through support for infrastructure, programming, and artist & audience development initiatives. We are part of one of the largest and most dynamic music communities in the world and this investment will help maximize its potential, paying dividends for the people of Ontario.” Jesse Kumagai, Director of Programming, The Corporation of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall

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For more information:

Amy Terrill – Vice President Public Affairs, Music Canada
aterrill@musiccanada.com 647-963-6044

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada, namely Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

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The Rambler by Graham Henderson: David Lowery & Chris Ruen Shine a Light on Brand Supported Piracy at Canadian Music Week’s Global Forum

Graham_headphones3Blog ThumbnailThe Rambler is a column by Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. Graham writes from time to time about developments in the music industry, new trends or just about music! Let’s face it, Graham has been around for a long time and has a lot to ramble on about.

Last month during Canadian Music Week, Music Canada was pleased to bring two of today’s foremost advocates for artist rights together for a discussion on brand-sponsored piracy. Music Canada has been sponsoring the Global Forum for several years now, because we feel it’s important to bring people who are connected with our world together to talk about the problems that we face. 

Brand supported piracy is a practice whereby Fortune 500 companies, either knowingly or unknowingly, purchase advertisements on illegal sites, providing the pirate sites with ad revenue while ad agencies, exchanges, and networks also make money in the process. The only ones who are not compensated are the artists whose works are exploited on these pirate sites.

This year, we were honoured to have two keynote speakers who have emerged as essential voices for musicians and creators in David Lowery and Chris Ruen. 

Many will know David Lowery as lead singer of the bands Camper Van Beethoven and Cracker, although he has also worked as a producer and started several music-related businesses including a studio, a record company, and a publishing company. Recently, he has emerged as one of the most articulate voices championing artist rights in the digital age, penning a series of blogs at The Trichordist, including Letter to Emily White at NPR All Songs Considered and Meet The New Boss, Worse Than The Old Boss?.

Chris Ruen is the author of the new book, ‘Freeloading: How Our Insatiable Appetite for Free Content Starves Creativity’, which is an essential read for those working in the music industry. His essays and criticism have appeared in The New York Times, Slate, The New York Press and Stereogum, and he brings both a music fan’s perspective and a journalist’s point of view to an issue that affects both creators and consumers. 

We were pleased to once again have Chris Castle moderate the discussion. Chris has been as one of the real, great artist advocates over the past several years, and I would encourage everyone to follow him on Twitter and his blog at www.musictechpolicy.com/. 

The video from the Global Forum is now available and embedded below; I would encourage all creators and those working in music to watch it and share it widely.


Graham Henderson is the President and CEO of Music Canada. He also writes on an eclectic range of topics on his personal blog at www.grahamhenderson.ca.

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The Rambler by Graham Henderson: In Conversation with Colin James

Graham_headphones3Blog ThumbnailThe Rambler is a column by Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada. Graham writes from time to time about developments in the music industry, new trends or just about music! Let’s face it, Graham has been around for a long time and has a lot to ramble on about.

In my first turn in the interviewer’s chair, I was thrilled to have had the opportunity to talk with Colin James as he celebrates 25 years in the music business. Colin has dedicated his life’s work to exploring rock, blues, and swing music, and he has been a key contributor to Canada’s music scene. He’s a six-time JUNO Award winner and the recipient of seventeen Maple Blues Awards, and was inducted to the Canadian Music Industry Hall of Fame last week during Canadian Music Week.

Special thanks to Jeff Cohen at Collective Concerts for allowing us shoot the video at Lee’s Palace, one of Toronto’s great live music venues.

Graham Henderson is the President of Music Canada. He also writes on an eclectic range of topics on his personal blog at www.grahamhenderson.ca.

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Media Advisory: The Next Big Bang, A New Direction for Music in Canada

Toronto, March 19, 2013: Music Canada President Graham Henderson will release a report presenting five key directions for the Canadian music industry during the State of the Industry address at Canadian Music Week on Thursday, March 21, 2013.

The music industry has undergone massive changes with the shift to digital technologies and platforms; all aspects of the industry have been disrupted. Yet many of the programs and supports designed to support this important cultural and economic sector were designed for the analog era.

With this in mind, Music Canada has, through months of research, interviews and expert submissions, developed seventeen policy recommendations in the following areas: music education, digital innovation, music tourism, export expansion and interconnected tax credits.

The Next Big Bang: A New Direction for Music in Canada
, will be released March 21st during a keynote address.

WHEN: Thursday, March 21, 2013 at Canadian Music Week, State of the Industry
WHO: Graham Henderson, President, Music Canada
WHAT: The Next Big Bang: A New Direction for Music in Canada
WHERE: Toronto Downtown Marriott Eaton Centre, Grand Ballroom C/D

One-on-one interviews can be arranged upon request. Also available for interviews will be the following contributors:

1. Jeff Leiper, Information and Communications Technology Council – Music Education
2. Darlene Tonelli – Digital Innovation
3. Nikki Rowling, Titan Music Group – Music Tourism
4. Peter Lyman, Nordicity – Tax Credits

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