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Canadian music companies successfully settle legal action against isoHunt

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Vancouver, 25 July 2016:  Canadian and international music companies have settled litigation against isoHunt Web Technologies Inc. (“isoHunt”) and its founder Gary Fung (“Fung”) with the entering of orders by consent against isoHunt and Fung.  The settlement ends a lawsuit filed in 2010 alleging substantial copyright infringement of music on the isoHunt site, as well as an opposing action filed by isoHunt and Fung.

isoHunt and Fung agreed to a court order finding them liable for infringing the music companies’ rights in their recordings, which were made available for BitTorrent file-sharing through isoHunt’s websites. Fung and isoHunt further agreed not to be associated with any service that makes the music companies’ recordings available without authorization, including by BitTorrent or any other file-sharing technology.

“Music companies in Canada stand shoulder-to-shoulder in the fight against illegitimate sites that distribute massive volumes of creative works without compensation to creators,” said Graham Henderson, President & CEO of Music Canada. “Thousands of Canadian creators, our creative industries, and their employees are directly harmed by these activities. This settlement is a step forward towards providing consumers with a marketplace in which legitimate online music services can thrive.”

isoHunt was one of the largest unauthorized BitTorrent sites in the world, offering access to a vast array of music and films for instant download by millions of users. It operated out of Vancouver with worldwide reach.

“Courts all over the world have confirmed that websites such as isoHunt infringe rights”, said Frances Moore, Chief Executive Officer of IFPI. “Artists, creators and record companies pay a heavy price for that infringement, in lost revenues, lost jobs and lost investment. This settlement sends a strong message that anyone who builds a business by encouraging and enabling copyright infringement faces legal consequences for these actions.”

A timeline of legal activities involving isoHunt:

  • 2008 – isoHunt files a petition in British Columbia Supreme Court against Canadian music companies, seeking to have its BitTorrent file-sharing site declared legal under the Canadian Copyright Act;
  • 2009 – The British Columbia Supreme Court rejects isoHunt’s application, and grants the Canadian music companies’ application to have the petition proceed by way of an action or full trial. isoHunt files such an action;
  • 2009 – A US federal district court finds isoHunt liable for copyright infringement in a case brought by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), citing unchallenged evidence that 95% of the files traded through isoHunt’s sites were likely infringing;
  • 2010 – Two dozen Canadian and international music companies file a lawsuit against isoHunt and Fung in British Columbia Supreme Court, alleging massive copyright infringement and seeking damages;
  • 2012 – The Canadian government passes The Copyright Modernization Act (Bill C-11), which ensures that businesses that enable infringement can be held liable for the activities they facilitate. In public statements, government representatives identify isoHunt as the type of “enabler” that the law is intended to target;
  • 2013 – A US federal court of appeals unanimously upholds the US district court’s decision;
  • 2013 – isoHunt and Fung agree to halt all operations worldwide and are deemed liable for a judgment of US$110 million in the US proceedings;
  • 2016 – by way of a consent order filed in the Canadian proceedings in British Columbia Supreme Court, isoHunt and Fung are liable for CAD$55 million in damages and an additional CAD$10 million in punitive damages.  isoHunt and Fung further agree not to be associated with any service that makes the music companies’ recordings available without authorization.

Despite these successful legal actions, piracy remains a significant problem for the music industry. IFPI estimates that 20 per cent of all fixed line internet users worldwide regularly access services offering infringing music. A recent report by the Digital Citizens Alliance demonstrates that one in three piracy sites contains malware, which could result in identity theft, stolen banking information, or exposure to hackers.

̶   Ends  ̶

For more information:

Quentin Burgess, Music Canada

qburgess@musiccanada.com

+1 (416) 967-7272 x106

 

Adrian Strain, Director of Communications, IFPI

adrian.strain@ifpi.org

+44 (0)20 7878 7935

 

 

Notes for editors:

About Music Canada

Music Canada is a non-profit trade organization that represents the major record companies in Canada, namely Sony Music Entertainment Canada, Universal Music Canada and Warner Music Canada. Music Canada also works with some of the leading independent record labels and distributors, recording studios, live music venues, concert promoters, managers and artists in the promotion and development of the music cluster.

About IFPI

IFPI is the organisation that promotes the interests of the international recording industry worldwide. Its membership comprises some 1,300 major and independent companies in 61 countries. It also has affiliated industry associations in 57 countries.  IFPI’s mission is to promote the value of recorded music, campaign for record producer rights and expand the commercial uses of recorded music in all its member markets.

 

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CONNECT announces increased royalties for Canadian music labels

CONNECT Music Licensing has announced that an efficiency project undertaken with Re:Sound Music Licensing has resulted in increased royalty payments for Canadian rights holders.

Data improvement and other efficiencies have led to an increase of CAD$1.2 million annually for CONNECT’s members, who range in size from major record labels to artist-owned imprints.

Improvements in data streams provided by CONNECT’s members, and the creation of a single repertoire database have also freed up an additional CAD$1 million in accelerated royalty payments for labels and another CAD$1 million to the performers on recordings through Re:Sound’s member organizations ACTRA RACS, MROC and ARTISTI.

“The increased royalties are particularly notable as they result from our drive to improve royalty collection in line with international best practices, as opposed to adding revenues from a new music service or higher tariff award from the Copyright Board,” said Graham Henderson, President of CONNECT Music Licensing, in the release. “Organizations like CONNECT and Re:Sound exist only to serve rights holders, and today we have delivered on that promise.”

Royalty distributions, as a result of this project, will also happen faster on ongoing basis. Depending on the tariff, payout timelines have been accelerated by 1-6 months, a CONNECT rep told Billboard.

Reaction from Canada’s major labels acknowledged their contribution through data stream improvements:

Members of Canada’s music industry also shared the positive news:

Coverage of the increase in royalties for Canadian rights holders has also been featured in Canadian Musician and FYI Music News.

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CONNECT Music Licensing achieves efficiency in royalty distribution

CONNECT Music Licensing has announced their decision to have their nearly 2,700 members receive public performance and private copying royalties directly from Re:Sound. The move marks a new level of efficiency in royalty distribution, making the distribution process simpler and more effective. Going forward, CONNECT’s members will receive public performance and private copying royalties directly from Re:Sound, eliminating duplication in the royalty distribution process and making it simpler and more cost effective. Per the release, the change will cut overall distribution costs by about one-third.

“CONNECT continuously strives to work as efficiently as possible. To this end, we saw a way to save time and money for our nearly 2,700 rights holders by having Re:Sound, a trusted partner of CONNECT, pay public performance and private copying royalties directly to our members. This will allow CONNECT to focus on reproduction royalties and will mean greater royalty payments to record labels and artists, faster,” said Graham Henderson, President of CONNECT Music Licensing.

“At Re:Sound, we are committed to maximizing public performance royalties for artists and record labels and ensuring that royalties are distributed as efficiently, and at as low cost, as possible. CONNECT’s move to bring their member labels to Re:Sound directly means more of every dollar will get into the hands of the labels themselves,” said Ian MacKay, President of Re:Sound.

The move was also applauded in CONNECT’s release by Mathieu Drouin, CONNECT Board Member and President of Crystal Math Music Group, Stuart Johnston, President of the Canadian Independent Music Association (CIMA), Shauna de Cartier, President of Six Shooter Records and Chair of CIMA, and Frances Moore, CEO, the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI).

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‘Value gap’ growing, according to new UK figures

New figures released yesterday at Canadian Music Week by the BPI – the record labels’ organization that promotes British music – highlight the growing “Value Gap” that exists between consumption of music in the UK and the amount that record labels and artists receive in revenues from video streaming platforms.

Geoff Taylor, BPI Chief Executive, told delegates that the number of people streaming music in the UK doubled in 2015, resulting in a 70 per cent increase in payments from services such as Spotify and Apple to record labels, helping to propel the market to overall growth.

However, while UK streams of music videos almost doubled during the same 12 month period, the revenues paid to labels for those streams flat-lined, rising by less than half of one per cent. This disparity neatly encapsulates the market distortion characterised by the IFPI as the “Value Gap”.

Taylor added: “The rising flow of royalties that should be nurturing artists and labels has slowed to a trickle, as platforms that rely on safe harbours use consumer demand for our music to grow their own businesses at the expense of creators.”

Frances Moore, CEO, IFPI, gave the keynote speech on the ‘State of the Global Music Industry’ in which she referred to the findings of IFPI’s recently released Global Music Report, which showed that the music industry grew in 2015 for the first time in almost two decades, with digital revenues overtaking physical revenues for the first time.

Addressing the conference, Moore said: “We are at an extraordinary moment in our global business. Music is being consumed at unprecedented levels. Measurable growth is being achieved for the first time in nearly two decades.

“Yet the job of turning around the global music industry is really only just beginning and the scale of the anomaly to be fixed is huge. Music is driving economic activity and digital commerce. Yet, in terms of the value being returned to its creators and investors, music is massively undervalued.”

Cary Sherman, Chairman and CEO, RIAA, said: “DMCA reform has become an international phenomenon. Thousands of artists, dozens of music organizations and managers are speaking out and it’s beginning to make a difference. The fundamental unfairness of our existing laws, the stature of artists and power of music, is breaking through like never before.”

Graham Henderson, President and CEO, Music Canada, said: “The value gap is a striking example of how wealth has shifted from those who create content – our artists and their partners – to the large companies that build their platforms on that content. Creators are worse off today than they were when digital came into their lives. This is disturbing and was avoidable. Policy makers now have the opportunity to rebalance the framework in such a way that creators are fairly compensated.”

Dan Rosen, Chief Executive, ARIA, said: “The local Australian music business has done a great job in embracing new digital platforms, giving fans unprecedented access to the music they love. However, we need to ensure that the policy environment reflects the true value that music provides to digital services and allow money to flow back to the artists and labels to sustain a healthy ecosystem of creativity.”

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Musicians without Borders’ Laura Hassler to keynote CMW Global Forum

Canadian Music Week (CMW) has announced that Laura Hassler, Founder and Director of Musicians without Borders, will be the keynote speaker at this year’s Global Forum Networking Breakfast. Musicians without Borders is a global organization that uses music to “bridge divides, connect communities, and heal the wounds of war.” The organization is currently working on projects in Palestine, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Music Canada is proud to return as sponsor of the 2016 Global Forum, which will celebrate and recognize individuals and organizations in the music community who are using music to make the world a better place. The invitation-only event takes place May 6th at the Sheraton Centre in Toronto.

“As the music community continues to focus on adapting to an evolving digital environment, this year’s Global Forum will take stock of the amazing power of music to unite us all and be a force for good,” said Graham Henderson, President and CEO of Music Canada, in the CMW release. “Laura Hassler and the panelists at this year’s Global Forum demonstrate every day that music has the ability to heal, console, inspire, ignite and connect.”

“We’re thrilled to have Laura Hassler at this year’s Global Forum,” added CMW President Neill Dixon. “The work that she and her organization is doing is of great importance to the global community.”

Following Hassler’s keynote, she will join a panel discussion with representatives of three other organizations using music to make the world a better place. The panel, moderated by journalist Nancy Wilson, will also include:

  • Andre Le Roux, Managing Director of South Africa’s SAMRO Foundation, the largest private contributor to music development in the Southern African region, supporting almost 50 community-based music schools and providing scholarships for music studies overseas;
  • Andrew Mosker, President and CEO of the National Music Centre in Calgary, which reaches music lovers through education, exhibitions, incubation and performance; and
  • Lee Whitmore, Vice President, Education Outreach and Social Entrepreneurship at Boston’s Berklee College of Music, where he leads Berklee City Music, a program that enables youth from underserved communities to develop musically, academically, socially and emotionally through the study of contemporary music.

 

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Guelph Chamber of Commerce to host ‘Guelph as Music City’ Summit

Next week, the Guelph Chamber of Commerce will host ‘Guelph as Music City’: What Successful Tourism Sounds Like, a half-day summit where key stakeholders will discuss the state of local music tourism and its potential as an economic driver in the Guelph region. The event takes place on Wednesday, April 27 from noon to 3:30pm at the Delta Guelph Hotel & Conference Centre (50 Stone Road West) in Guelph, ON.

The event will feature two panel discussions, a keynote presentation by Music Canada’s Graham Henderson, a Q & A session, as well as a pair of performances: an opening performance by Alanna Gurr, and intermission performance by NEFE.

The opening panel, Setting the Stage, will be emceed by Hayley Kellett of The Making Box, and includes panelists:

  • Kithio Mwanzia – President & CEO, Guelph Chamber of Commerce
  • Marie Zimmerman – Executive Director, Hillside Festival
  • His Worship Mayor Cam Guthrie – Mayor of the City of Guelph
  • Kathryn McGarry – MPP for Cambridge on behalf of the Ontario Minister for Tourism, Culture & Sport

Following lunch, Music Canada President & CEO will present Music Meets Municipality: Key learning’s from The Mastering of a Music City. The keynote will cite best practices gleaned from The Mastering of a Music City, the 2015 report by Music Canada and IFPI that sets out how cities worldwide can take simple steps to help develop their music economies.

Following NEFE’s performance is the Leadership Panel, with moderator Rob McLean of Kazolu , and panelists:

  • Erin Benjamin – Music Canada Live
  • Brian Heatherman – Music Ontario
  • Robert Leader – JAM School

The full agenda is available on the Chamber website. To register, or for more information, visit http://www.guelphchamber.com/attend/event_calendar/#id=1557&cid=119&wid=701.

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Canada Outpaces Global Music Revenue Growth in 2015 but Outlook Remains Cautious

The global music community celebrates a return to revenue positive in 2015 with a 3.2% growth of industry revenues to US$ 15 billion, while Canada more than doubles this upswing with an 8.3% increase, helping to make up for a double digit loss in 2014.

Driven by a strong release schedule and explosive growth in premium subscription services, largely the result of new entrants in the Canadian market, 2015 finished as an exceptional year for the Canadian music industry. In fact, three of the top ten global recording artists in 2015 were Canadian: Justin Bieber at number four, Drake at number nine and The Weeknd rounding out the top ten.

Despite these positive results however, it is too early to confidently declare a reversal in trends, given that losses in 2012 (-2.9%), 2013 (-5.4%) and 2014 (-11.0%) followed immediately after the positive 2011 figures (+3.1%), which marked the first revenue growth in this century in Canada.

Complete global figures and analysis were released today in IFPI’s Global Music Report 2016.

Highlights of Canada’s 2015 Music Revenues:

  • Digital revenues surge to 52% of total revenues (US$173.5 million), somewhat higher than the global share of 45%
  • Premium streaming revenues explode in Canada, with a 151% increase (US$29.4m in 2015 v. US$11.85m in 2014), overtaking ad-supported streaming revenue, which only grew 32% (US$19.49m in 2015 v. US$14.76m in 2014)
  • Physical revenues in Canada make up 35% of the market (US$ 118.9million), slightly lower than the global share of 39%
  • Performance rights revenues are 11% in Canada compared to 14% globally
  • Synchronization rights are 2% compared to 2% globally

In Canada, as in other countries around the world, a record volume of music is being consumed, yet artists and producers are not enjoying fair compensation, primarily because upload services like YouTube are not paying normal music licensing rates due to the misapplication of a legislative framework called “safe harbours”. This has created what is known as the “value gap”. Furthermore, the “value gap” has resulted in a distorted market, where premium services are forced to compete unfairly with other services that use copyrighted content to build their businesses, but do not pay fair rates.

“In Canada, where premium streaming has had such a significant positive effect on our market in 2015, the “value gap”, where ad-supported services benefit from lower-than-normal licensing rates, causes immense concerns,” says Graham Henderson, President & CEO of Music Canada. “We hope that legislators will work with the music community to address this market distortion and reduce the gap so that rights holders are compensated fairly for their work.”

Complete market information for Canada and all other national markets will be released on Thursday, April 14, 2016 by IFPI.

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Quoted: BC Music Fund Announcement

Last month, at an event at the historic Warehouse Studios in Vancouver, Premier Christy Clark announced a $15 million grant towards the creation of a BC Music Fund, which will be administered by Creative BC. The event also included remarks from Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson, Jon Garson, President and CEO of the BC Chamber of Commerce, Diamond-certified artist Michael Bublé, and Scott Johnson, Chair of Music BC. A selection of quotes and video from the event are available below:

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“Music, as it turns out, doesn’t just drive our culture, but our economy. We now understand that thriving music scenes attract and retain young talented workers and the businesses that employ them. Music, in effect, can be the glue that holds our communities together.” – Graham Henderson, President & CEO, Music Canada

 

“No matter who you are, no matter how young, how old, no matter how esoteric your art may be, we want you to have a chance to succeed in British Columbia. And we want you to know that our province supports and is passionate about what you are doing in the way that you are changing the place that we live.” - Premier Christy Clark

“No matter who you are, no matter how young, how old, no matter how esoteric your art may be, we want you to have a chance to succeed in British Columbia. And we want you to know that our province supports and is passionate about what you are doing in the way that you are changing the place that we live.” – Premier Christy Clark

 

“Thanks to you Premier, people who want to pursue a music career here will be able to do so and not have to leave home, which is pretty incredible. I mean, for a long time, people have had to go to Ontario if they want to be able to afford to make the record…Truly, it’s never been tougher to develop a career as an artist. The 15 million dollars that Premier Clark has committed to this industry, is going to help that BC does everything it takes to make a thriving and strong music scene.” - Micheal Bublé

“Thanks to you Premier, people who want to pursue a music career here will be able to do so and not have to leave home, which is pretty incredible. I mean, for a long time, people have had to go to Ontario if they want to be able to afford to make the record…Truly, it’s never been tougher to develop a career as an artist. The 15 million dollars that Premier Clark has committed to this industry, is going to help that BC does everything it takes to make a thriving and strong music scene.” – Micheal Bublé

 

“All children need the opportunity to express themselves through music as part of their education, and know that this is a viable career path for them.” - Jon Garson, President & CEO, BC Chamber of Commerce

“All children need the opportunity to express themselves through music as part of their education, and know that this is a viable career path for them.” – Jon Garson, President & CEO, BC Chamber of Commerce

 

“I’ve often thought, this is the Nashville of the North…it’s time we stand up and represent ourselves as such.” - Scott Johnson, President, Music BC

“I’ve often thought, this is the Nashville of the North…it’s time we stand up and represent ourselves as such.” – Scott Johnson, President, Music BC

 

Mother Mother performs.

Mother Mother performs.

 

 

Music-Canada-Feb-11-009

 

Music-Canada-Feb-11-063

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Music Canada’s Graham Henderson remarks on ‘BC’s Music Sector – From Adversity to Opportunity’ report

Yesterday, Music Canada President and CEO Graham Henderson unveiled our latest report, BC’s Music Sector – From Adversity to Opportunity, at an event at the historic Warehouse Studios in Vancouver. At the event, Premier Christy Clark announced a $15 million grant towards the creation of a BC Music Fund, which will be administered by Creative BC. The event also included remarks from Jon Garson, President and CEO of the BC Chamber of Commerce, Diamond-certified artist Michael Bublé, and Scott Johnson, Chair of Music BC.

Supporting BC Music

Henderson’s remarks on the BC Music Sector report are available below:

“My name is Graham Henderson, President of Music Canada.

The social media hashtag for this event is #musiccanhelp.

Welcome to the official launch of Music Canada’s study of the music industry in BC which we have titled “From Adversity to Opportunity.” A study perhaps long overdue given the importance of the BC music scene to Canada’s national and international identity.

Now, obviously, based on who is up here on this stage with me, we are here to do more than talk about the realm of possibility…about what could or might happen.

I think we are here to talk about action, about what IS going to happen. But we will need to wait a moment longer to hear about THAT.

Music Canada is a national organization that aspires to be a trusted source, a respected forum and an inspirational advocate for all things music. Our members, Sony, Warner and Universal are the folks who stand behind and funded this research. And we all owe them a debt of thanks for what is a very significant investment.

But it is the music community of BC who supplied the impetus, the motivation and the passion upon which our work was based.

And while the instigators are many, a few do stand out. My dear friend Garth Richardson who literally berated me on FB to stand up for the BC music scene. Bob Deith and Scott Johnson, Rick Baker, Patrick Aldous and the entire team at Music BC who laid so much of the groundwork and who supplied us with local wisdom and know how. Nick Blasko whose advice and connections were indispensable. And, of course Bruce Allen – what can I say – when Bruce Allen starts demanding your attention….well…I think we all know where that leads – ACTION!

So why are we here? We are here because BC has one of the world’s great music scenes. We are here because the people of BC – and its government – care passionately about their music and their artists. But we are also here because this great natural resource is imperiled.

We heard this message loud and clear from the over 100 music community leaders that we interviewed. Their opinions and recommendations form the basis of our report.

The genesis of the idea was simple yet daunting. Why not imagine, why not implement, a provincial programme which would take into account the vast changes that have swept through music’s ecosystem.

To do this requires us to change the way we think about music. In international surveys people repeatedly rank music as one of life’s supreme sources of pleasure and emotional power, says a recent NYT article. But a new MIT study goes further — apparently our brain gives more a specialized treatment to music than it does to speech itself. This clearly underscores the absolutely crucial importance of music education to the growth and development of young minds. Music also has a cohesive, healing potential – a subject which will be celebrated by Music Canada at our upcoming Global Music Forum at CMW in May where we will celebrate the pioneering work of Laura Hasler and Musicians Without Borders.

Musicians without Borders is a global network of musicians and music lovers based in the Netherlands that uses music to heal the wounds of war. They design community music projects around the world that help people deal with trauma, fear, isolation and the effects of conflict.

Music in a very real and meaningful sense can be said to be who we are as a species.

Studies undertaken by Music Canada demonstrate the importance of music to tourism, to education, to the diversification of municipal, provincial and federal economies. Music, as it turns out drives not just our culture, but our economy. We now understand that thriving music scenes attract and retain young, talented workers and the businesses that employ them. Music, in effect, can be the glue that holds communities together.

It is this aspect which is attracting the attention of Chambers of Commerce across the country, including our friends at the BC Chamber of Commerce, the “Voice of Business” in BC. We are so thankful to have the endorsement and support of the BC Chamber and it is a sign of the importance of music to the economy that Jon Garson is here and that the Chamber has partnered with us in this launch.

Our report has collected a wealth of wisdom from the people of BC. From those inside the music industry and in government itself. The report was in effect a collaborative effort with the government of BC. They were excited by what we were telling them and we were urged to press on and come up with recommendations.

Embracing our recommendations would help BC to:

  • Create and retain jobs
  • Grow and diversify the economy
  • Attract foreign direct investment
  • Build more vibrant music scenes
  • Boost tourism development
  • Attract talent to other sectors like the digital arts
  • And contribute to cultural and artistic growth

We argue that BC does not just need a fund, BC needs a Music Strategy. BC needs to brand itself nationally and internationally as the music mecca that it is. BC needs to provide the policy framework to offer a turbo boost to that which it already has.

Our recommendations in this report are tailored to the specific needs of BC and are designed to position the province to compete in an increasingly global marketplace while also creating more opportunities for emerging BC artists to succeed and earn a living from their music.

We suggest in this report that a $15 million investment will produce an estimated total GDP impact of $73 million for BC’s economy.

Additionally, further red tape reductions would boost music activity relating to venues and festivals throughout the province.

Importantly, we believe more focus and funding on music education is a linchpin to this strategy. And in this regard our discussions with Minister Bernier have been fantastically encouraging.

Surely all of this suggests that music deserves special attention from policy makers. Surely you would think governments should respond to these new ways of understanding the importance of music. Surely governments should act! But, oh! People will tell you that governments do not move at the speed of business. That they are incapable of nimbly responding to the rapidly changing environment. That the bureaucracy of government is impenetrable – change takes years.

Well…..they are WRONG!! At least in the case of BC. At every point, our message has been embraced with enthusiasm by the government of BC and in particular by the Premier. We have received valuable guidance and advice. All of which has led to to where we are right now. Trembling in anticipation of what the Premier is about to tell us!

Now, before I turn the podium over to Jon Garson, President of the BC Chamber of Commerce who will introduce the person everyone REALLY wants to hear from, there is someone else I must acknowledge. And he is not here today only because he is performing a sold out show tonight in New York. And that is Bryan Adams.

From the first moment that Bruce Allen put me in touch with Bryan, it was clear that this was a cause he would embrace wholeheartedly. He has been a passionate supporter of our work and I can say without a hint of exaggeration that his involvement was pivotal. Bryan flew in especially to attend our reception at the Museum in Victoria. In addition to speaking, folks who were there will recall that he doubled as Jesse Roper’s guitar tech when a microphone failed. But what he said there I think reflects what this all about.

This is not about preserving the past, or even the now. This is about the future. Young musicians, he said, face a very different reality. There was a system, a “ladder”, if you will, that yesterday’s aspiring young musicians were able to ascend. Well that world has vanished and businesses, governments, and yes fans, need to think about how we can all work together to create a more congenial, and yes, PROFITABLE environment for our musicians. They must be able to earn a decent living as professionals. If music is one of life’s supreme sources of pleasure and emotional power, then we should all honour and support those who create it.

And with that said I will turn the podium over to Jon Garson who will introduce the premier.”

 

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Premier Clark announces new $15M BC Music Fund

Today we thank Premier Clark and the Government of British Columbia on their announcement to dedicate a $15 million grant to support the creation of a BC Music Fund as part of a comprehensive strategy to protect and promote the province’s music industry.

“This is an historic day for the province,” says Graham Henderson, President & CEO of Music Canada. “The creation of a BC Music Fund as part of a fulsome strategy to strengthen the province’s music industry, will enhance BC’s competitiveness as a location for the production and presentation of music. The BC Music Fund will help music businesses produce, distribute, promote, and stage the province’s emerging and well-known artists. It will allow the province to retain its deep inventory of talented music professionals, and create new opportunities for jobs and investment, contributing to a more diversified economy.”

Premier Christy Clark announced the $15 million grant as part of the launch of Music Canada’s report, BC’s Music Sector: From Adversity to Opportunity, at Vancouver’s Warehouse Studios. The event also included remarks by Michael Bublé, Jon Garson, President & CEO of the BC Chamber of Commerce and Scott Johnson, Chair of Music BC.

“B.C. is one of Canada’s leading centres for music with talented musicians in every corner of the province,” says Premier Clark. “Our record labels, recording studios, concert venues and music festivals draw people from all over the province, the country and the world. Music develops culture, promotes talent and diversifies our strong and growing economy.”

BC’s Music Sector: From Adversity to Opportunity was prepared by Music Canada after interviews and consultations with more than 100 individuals in BC’s music sector, the broader business community, municipal and provincial governments, provincial agencies, and community leaders.

The report highlights British Columbia’s wealth of music talent and the factors that have put these assets at risk. The report encourages decisive action on the part of the provincial government, municipalities, and music stakeholders to put BC’s music sector firmly back on the map and secure the benefits it can generate.

“The landscape and culture in BC has always been a huge catalyst in my creative process,” says Ryan Guldemond of Mother Mother who performed at the event. “It’s where we came together as a band, and where we’ve cultivated our creative community. There is an incredible wealth of talent here, and until now, the resources and infrastructure haven’t been able to properly support and elevate the art that is constantly being created. It’s incredibly heartening to see the powers that be sit up and take notice of the cultural and economic benefit the BC music industry provides for our province. Dedicating more resources to this sector will have a lasting positive impact on our cultural landscape.”

BC’s Music Sector: From Adversity to Opportunity is available at http://musiccanada.com/resources/research/bcs-music-sector-from-adversity-to-opportunity.

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